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Comment netbooks were a wonderful idea (Score 1) 336

for linux, hence partly why i think asus is canning them. its not to say other manufacturers wont give the atom chipset a run in the same vein as asus, just that they might not call them a netbook anymore. They ran most distros with ease and had few driver problems (except the one they released with poulsbo 500 chipset, and even then issues were resolved in about 6-8 months.)

the market for linux probably didnt pan out the way asus figured it might, and the chromebook certainly pounded a few coffin nails in the overall concept, but thats okay. I use netbooks because of their great battery life and low cost. If i lose or break my encrypted EEEPC 901 in the airport, i hop onto ebay and pick up another used for around $100 or so. Theres also something quite liberating about having a four an a half hour flight across the country where you get to operate a laptop during the entire thing.

Comment the strength is where (Score 2) 355

it always has been: in the community.
when they kicked around ACPI as a standard that intentionally didnt 'just work' on linux, we made it work.
when dvd was a big-two game, the community came together again and made that work as well
when windows mandated the wholly superfluous 'windows' key we simply coopted it to our own desires. Awesomewm, for example.
absolutely tireless effort was spent making sure every iteration of broken windows continued to be supported as a dual-boot option in Grub.

We engineered solutions for their docs, excels, and even the very programs that ran only on windows in the form of Wine.
secure boot could come, and against it will stand a threat that microsoft has consistently underestimated: Hackers. We cannot be lobbied against, or coded around. there is no NDA we recognize or understand. Im not saying UEFI shouldnt be stopped, just that if and when it comes, we have been ready since the dawn of the kernel to make it do what we want it to do.

Comment Re:Myth TV plugin? (Score 1) 383

It seems that the FCC is relying on citizen complaints for enforcement.

and what would lead you to this conclusion? that after ten years the denizens of the airwaves have had a paper tiger unleashed upon them in response to the number one complaint of the people a regulatory body is sworn to protect? the FCC is no more charged to protect content consumers than is the FDA or USDA, they are all charged to protect and promote the consumer capitalism that drives the american economy. in this case it appears the FCC have finally been forced to act in the interest of consumers if only to avoid the infallible appearance as a corporate lapdog.

Comment so it seems (Score 4, Insightful) 190

we're in for a repeat of the smoking and cancer studies. If at first the science doesnt work out in the shareholders interests, change your studies to "controversies" and buy some airtime on Fox News.

or simply revise the outcome to "fracking safe for multi-billionaires because drilling is illegal in marthas vinyard"

Comment calling bullshit on the OP. (Score 1) 346

'They're still more modern than anything in the Iranian air force inventory, and they would even be helpful to China in their jet engine development

No, they arent the mig 29 is a newer and arguably better aircraft than the F16 could ever hope to be. and if that isnt 'modern' enough, the SU 30's bolstering the Iranian air force sport avionics alone that make the F16 look like a model T.
chinas current fleet of J series aircraft are powered by the Saturn AL-31 or domestically produced clones with nothing except the turboblades imported. it has 27,600lbs of thrust, compared to the emaciated 17,600lbs of thrust for the pratt and whitney powering the F16.
in summation: Israel is bang on, the F16 has been a collectors item for quite some time.

Comment can anyone explain why (Score 0) 340

this site should exist in the first place? the nuclear chemistry behind reprocessing is viable and has been utilized for decades to convert spent fuel into reusable nuclear fuel. this just sounds like a lobby of large energy companies got together and concluded it was easier to bury the waste and forget about it than it was to handle it like responsible corporate citizens and ensure we arent wasting a finite resource.

Comment ive always thought the idea (Score 0) 239

of a "nuclear non-proliferation" act to be pointless. North Korea has nuclear weapons and as a black-eye to foreign policy rhetoric in the US, has not used them in combat. nor have Pakistan or India.
Israel has nuclear weapons, has not signed the non-proliferation treaty, and once a year seems to invade a neighbouring state or assassinate their scientists and political leaders.

the biggest threat to proliferation is Iran acquiring the technology, and using it as a deterrent to nations that might want to "liberate" it of its oil or natural resources.
nuclear non proliferation amounts to censorship.

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