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Submission + - Climate Scientist/Evangelical Christian Katharine Hayhoe Preaches to Unbelievers (sagepub.com)

Lasrick writes: Rush Limbaugh dismissed her as a "climate babe," but Katharine Hayhoe has degrees in physics, astronomy, and atmospheric science, and has made it her life's work to convince the Religious Right to believe in and do something about climate change. A great interview with Hayhoe at the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists.

Submission + - The Atlantic: What if we never run out of oil? (theatlantic.com)

symbolset writes: The Atlantic is running an indepth article on energy. The premise is that there remain incalculable and little-understood carbon fuel assets that far outweigh all the fossil fuels ever discovered, lists them and discusses their potentials and consequences fiscal and environmental.

On a related note, today the US Geological Survey more than doubled their estimate of Bakken shale oil reserve in North Dakota and Montana to 7.4-11 billion barrels.

Submission + - Do 'time crystals' exhibit perpetual motion? (wired.com)

ceview writes: So this story on Wired seems to have got lots of people a bit confused. The experimental set up is incredibly delicate (Bose Einstein Condensate) so it implies this perpetual motion effect can't really be used to extract energy. What is your take on it? It can't really upend anything because at a quantum level things behave weirdly at the best of times.

The heavy details are here
http://arxiv.org/abs/1202.2539v2
http://arxiv.org/abs/1202.2537v2

Submission + - DMCA Safe Harbor May Not Apply To Old Copyrighted Works

tlhIngan writes: On Tuesday, the New York appellate court denied Grooveshark the DMCA safe harbor protection on songs like Johnny B. Goode. What happened was due to an oddity in the law, the DMCA does not apply to state-licensed copyrighted works (those copyrighted before February 15, 1972). What happened was Congress overhauled copyright law to make it a Federal matter, but all works prior to that date still come under common-law and state statutes. The end result is that Grooveshark does not have DMCA safe harbor protection for older works and may be sued for copyright infringement (barring other agreements, e.g., UMG and YouTube), even though they fully comply with the DMCA otherwise, taking down copyrighted materials. Grooveshark is a "music locker" service allowing users to upload music for others to listen to.

Submission + - Cray-1 vs. AMD 7990, Then vs. Now (edn.com)

EmagGeek writes: In 1976, a Cray-1 supercomputer cost $36M (in 2013 dollars) and could execute floating point math at 160 MFLOP. The supercomputer had a 5.2V power supply that delivered almost 800 amps to the circuitry. The machine was the size of a small Volkswagen and required a refrigeration system to dissipate the 4000 watts of electricity it took to run.

The fastest PC video card on the market today costs $1000 and can execute floating point math at 8,200,000 MFLOP, consumes energy at a rate of just less than 400 watts, and is about the size of a paperback book.

50,000 times faster, 1/36,000 the price, 1/10th the energy, and about 1/5,000 the volume. It's interesting how they had to solve the enormous power requirements of supercomputers at the time, and how they have continued to solve them over the years as power densities have increased.

Comment Correct (Score 2) 630

I agree.

I have three projects on GitHub. One of them is practice code I was writing for when I interviewed with Google (don't worry, they didn't ask me a single question that was on the study sheet - but I did have fun writing a splay tree). It was just a bunch of functions with a description of "nothing to see here".

Another project is eventually going to be a GPL project that runs a football pool. Currently it's just a parser that scrapes nfl.com and puts info into data structs. I haven't bothered putting the license file in it yet. It uses another GPL library, so it's already implied that it will be GPL code when it matures past being a bunch of functions sewn together just enough to test them. Why would I put a license on that? So I can be sure that I get changes back for incomplete interfaces? The interfaces aren't even defined yet.

The last project, I can't even recall what it is. I'm not maintaining it and I don't care if anyone swipes the code. It's probably code that scratched an itch that I had that was unique to me.

Submission + - Blame austerity on Excel .. (motherjones.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: From Mike Konczal, summarizing a new study that says Carmen Reinhart and Ken Rogoff made a coding error in a famous paper claiming that economic growth slows down in countries with debt levels above 90 percent of GDP:

Submission + - OpenShot Video Editor Achieves $35k on Kickstarter, Final Goal in Reach! (kickstarter.com) 5

JonOomph writes: The popular open source video editor, OpenShot, has less than 39 hours remaining on popular crowd-funding site, Kickstarter.com. The lead developer, Jonathan Thomas, has proposed a revolutionary new feature, which would allow users to offload CPU, memory, and disk cache to a local server (or multiple local servers), dramatically increasing the speed of previewing and rendering. The more servers added to the pool, the faster the video editing engine becomes (with the primary limitation being network bandwidth). If the final goal of $40k is reached in the remaining hours, this feature will be added to the next version of OpenShot.

Comment Let them decide (Score 1) 122

Let your family decide what they want to do with your data. Write down all of your passwords (if you're like me, you've got about a dozen) along with your usual accounts on a piece of paper and put them in a safety deposit box. When you pass and they go through your deposit box, they'll come across your credentials and decide what they'd like to do with your digital data. Some people would like to read it, others would prefer not to.

This strategy has an added bonus; if they ever come across a site that you belonged to, they've got a login that'll probably work.

Submission + - Reddit meme suggests murder confession (networkworld.com)

colinneagle writes: The popular Confession Bear meme is typically used to make light-hearted personal confessions, like this one. But on Sunday, one Redditor's Confession Bear meme claiming that he murdered the abusive boyfriend of his sister brought on enough suspicion to lead him to delete his Reddit and Facebook accounts.

The meme read "My sister had an abusive meth addict / I killed him with his own drugs while he was unconscious and they ruled it as an overdose." While a meme can hardly be an indicator of actual guilt, the Redditor who posted it quickly realized the implications of the post and quickly began closing his Reddit and Facebook accounts. But he wasn't quick enough to do that before a few curious Reddit users were able to find his name, location, job history, and military rank through a few simple web searches.

One Reddit user who claims to have this information declined to post it to the site, but given the gravity of the "confession," should he?

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Prof: So the American government went to IBM to come up with a data encryption standard and they came up with ... Student: EBCDIC!"

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