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Government

Submission + - Feds offer $20M for critical open source energy network cybersecurity tools (networkworld.com) 1

coondoggie writes: "The US Department of Energy today said it would spend $20 million on the development of advanced cybersecurity tools to help protect the nation's vulnerable energy supply. The DOE technologies developed under this program should be interoperable, scalable, cost-effective advanced tools that do not impede critical energy delivery functions, that are innovative and can easily be commercialized or made available through open source for no cost."
Star Wars Prequels

Submission + - Dad Makes Light-Up Star Destroyer Cake for Son's Birthday! (warp2search.net)

An anonymous reader writes: Birthday cakes have come a long way from their humble, three layer, round beginnings. Today's cakes are made to light up, make noise, defy gravity, and walk the dog, all the while tasting good. This 3D printed cake is no exception.
Crime

Submission + - Spy Drones Used to Hunt Down Christopher Dorner

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "The Express reports that as a task force of 125 officers continue their search for Christopher Dorner in the rugged terrain around Big Bear, it was revealed that Dorner has become the first human target for remotely-controlled airborne drones on US soil. “The thermal imaging cameras the drones use may be our only hope of finding him," says a senior police source. "On the ground, it’s like looking for a needle in a haystack.” The use of drones was confirmed by Customs and Border Patrol spokesman Ralph DeSio, who revealed agents have been prepared for Dorner to make a dash for the Mexican border since his rampage began. “This agency has been at the forefront of domestic use of drones by law enforcement.” Dorner, who was fired from the LAPD in 2008 for lying about a fellow officer he accused of misconduct, has vowed to wreak revenge by “killing officers and their families”. According to San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon: "To be honest, he could be anywhere right now. Torching his own vehicle could have been a diversion to throw us off track. Anything is possible with this man.”"
The Internet

Submission + - Cutting-edge program seeks to thwart radio spectrum battles, bottlenecks (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "With only a certain amount of truly useable radio spectrum it is inevitable that more battles of the use of that space become more frequent. Deflecting such battles will perhaps be the end result of a new program researchers at Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) will detail later this month. DARPA's Shared Spectrum Access for Radar and Communications (SSPARC) program has a goal of boosting radar and communications capabilities for military and commercial users by creating technical ways to enable spectrum sharing."

Submission + - US to spend 500 Million dollars destroying our stock of U233 (thoriumpetition.com) 1

drewm1980 writes: U233 is an isotope of Uranium that can be used for starting molten salt breeder reactors, among other things. The US Dept. of Energy is in the process of spending half a million dollars to destroy the US's stockpile of this resource, since it is not currently used by the united states. A whitehouse.gov petition to stop this destruction ends Feb. 12.
Crime

Submission + - IRS steps up challenging identity theft battle (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "The Internal Revenue Service continues to battle against the rising tide of identity theft saying that it recently completed what it called a massive national sweep targeting 389 suspects in 32 states and Puerto Rico. The IRS Criminal Investigation unit the total number of identity theft investigations to more than 1,460 since the start of the federal 2012 fiscal year on Oct. 1, 2011."
Politics

Submission + - First city in the United States to pass an anti-drone resolution (aljazeera.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Charlottesville, Virginia is the first city in the United States to pass an anti-drone resolution. The writing of the resolution coincides with a leaked memo outlining the legal case for drone strikes on US citizens and a Federal Aviation Administration plan to allow the deployment of some 30,000 domestic drones.
Intel

Submission + - Intel Gigabit NIC Packet of Death (krisk.org)

An anonymous reader writes: All it takes is a quick Google search to see that the Intel 82574L ethernet controller has had at least a few problems. Including, but not necessarily limited to, EEPROM issues, ASPM bugs, MSI-X quirks, etc. We spent several months dealing with each and every one of these. We thought we were done.

Using Ostinato I was able to craft various versions of this packet — an HTTP POST, ICMP echo-request, etc. Pretty much whatever I wanted. With a modified HTTP server configured to generate the data at byte value (based on headers, host, etc) you could easily configure an HTTP 200 response to contain the packet of death — and kill client machines behind firewalls!

Crime

Submission + - Cybercrime ring stole $200M, invented 7,000 fake IDs, thousands of credit cards (networkworld.com) 1

coondoggie writes: "The FBI today said it broke up what it called one of the largest credit card, cyber-fraud schemes in its history — a $200M scam that created more than 7,000 false identities and tens of thousands of fake credit cards. The FBI said it arrested 13 people involved in the scam the agency said maintained more than 1,800 "drop addresses," located across the country including houses, apartments, and post office boxes, which they used as the mailing addresses of the false identities."
Google

Submission + - US wants Apple, Google, and Microsoft to get a grip on mobile privacy (networkworld.com) 1

coondoggie writes: "When it comes to relatively new technologies, few have been developing at the relentless pace of mobile. But with that development has come a serious threat to the security of personal information and privacy. The Federal Trade Commission today issued a report on mobility issues and said less than one-third of Americans feel they are in control of their personal information on their mobile devices."

Submission + - How the Super Bowl will reach US submarines (foxnews.com)

Velcroman1 writes: Ever wonder how troops serving abroad in remote locations and even underwater might get to watch the Super Bowl? The very same highly advanced technology used to pass classified drone video feeds will be deployed this Sunday to ensure U.S. troops can see the Super Bowl — - no matter how far away from home they are. The broadcast is the result of a unique media, government and technology partnership with the American Forces Radio and Television Service, Raytheon and the U.S. Air Force. The Global Broadcast Service (GBS) may be normally used to disseminate video, images and other data, but major sporting events have been broadcast over it as well. The system will be “as small as a laptop, and [equipment] the size of a shoebox and umbrella” yet “in other places will be projected onto large screens in hangers” like aircraft carriers out at sea, explained Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems’ chief innovation officer Mark Bigham.
Crime

Submission + - FTC gets 744 new ideas on how to cut nasty robocallers off at the knees (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "The Federal Trade Commission today said the submission period for its Robocall Challenge had ended and it got 744 new ideas for ways to shut down the annoying automated callers. The FTC noted that the vast majority of telephone calls that deliver a prerecorded message trying to sell something to the recipient are illegal. The FTC regulates these calls under the Telemarketing Sales Rule and the Challenge was issued to developing technical or functional solutions and proofs of concepts that can block illegal robocalls which despite the agency's best efforts seem to be increasing."
Science

Submission + - A 270-Million-Year-Old Tapeworm Infection in Shark Feces (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: While examining fossilized shark feces collected from southern Brazil, researchers noticed a strange cluster of oval-shaped objects. Taking a closer look, they realized they had found a tapeworm egg case bearing an uncanny resemblance to those produced by modern pests today. Such discoveries are exceptionally rare. The "amazing" new specimen contains 93 tiny eggs, they write, each measuring about the same width as a human hair. Some of the eggs appear swollen, suggesting that they still contain the makings of ancient tapeworm babies. One of the eggs even holds what appears to be a developing larva. The egg case ranks as the earliest known evidence of tapeworm parasitism in vertebrates, indicating that this particular parasite has been plaguing fellow animals since the days of the massive supercontinent Pangaea.

Submission + - Physicists Create Chip with where Data travels in 3D (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: Physicists over at the University of Cambridge have created a microchip that allows information to travel in 3D and is capable of storing up to 1,000 times more data as compared to currently available microchips. Data stored in the 3D microchip can not only move from left to right but can also move between the layers of the metals stacked horizontally in the chip. Describing today’s chips as bungalows where everything happens only on one floor, the researchers have said that they have created “stairways allowing information to pass between floors.” Made out of layers of cobalt, platinum and ruthenium atoms digital information is stored in cobalt and platinum atoms and the ruthenium atoms are used to communicate the information between the layers.

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