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Google

Submission + - US wants Apple, Google, and Microsoft to get a grip on mobile privacy (networkworld.com) 1

coondoggie writes: "When it comes to relatively new technologies, few have been developing at the relentless pace of mobile. But with that development has come a serious threat to the security of personal information and privacy. The Federal Trade Commission today issued a report on mobility issues and said less than one-third of Americans feel they are in control of their personal information on their mobile devices."

Submission + - How the Super Bowl will reach US submarines (foxnews.com)

Velcroman1 writes: Ever wonder how troops serving abroad in remote locations and even underwater might get to watch the Super Bowl? The very same highly advanced technology used to pass classified drone video feeds will be deployed this Sunday to ensure U.S. troops can see the Super Bowl — - no matter how far away from home they are. The broadcast is the result of a unique media, government and technology partnership with the American Forces Radio and Television Service, Raytheon and the U.S. Air Force. The Global Broadcast Service (GBS) may be normally used to disseminate video, images and other data, but major sporting events have been broadcast over it as well. The system will be “as small as a laptop, and [equipment] the size of a shoebox and umbrella” yet “in other places will be projected onto large screens in hangers” like aircraft carriers out at sea, explained Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems’ chief innovation officer Mark Bigham.
Crime

Submission + - FTC gets 744 new ideas on how to cut nasty robocallers off at the knees (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "The Federal Trade Commission today said the submission period for its Robocall Challenge had ended and it got 744 new ideas for ways to shut down the annoying automated callers. The FTC noted that the vast majority of telephone calls that deliver a prerecorded message trying to sell something to the recipient are illegal. The FTC regulates these calls under the Telemarketing Sales Rule and the Challenge was issued to developing technical or functional solutions and proofs of concepts that can block illegal robocalls which despite the agency's best efforts seem to be increasing."
Science

Submission + - A 270-Million-Year-Old Tapeworm Infection in Shark Feces (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: While examining fossilized shark feces collected from southern Brazil, researchers noticed a strange cluster of oval-shaped objects. Taking a closer look, they realized they had found a tapeworm egg case bearing an uncanny resemblance to those produced by modern pests today. Such discoveries are exceptionally rare. The "amazing" new specimen contains 93 tiny eggs, they write, each measuring about the same width as a human hair. Some of the eggs appear swollen, suggesting that they still contain the makings of ancient tapeworm babies. One of the eggs even holds what appears to be a developing larva. The egg case ranks as the earliest known evidence of tapeworm parasitism in vertebrates, indicating that this particular parasite has been plaguing fellow animals since the days of the massive supercontinent Pangaea.

Submission + - Physicists Create Chip with where Data travels in 3D (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: Physicists over at the University of Cambridge have created a microchip that allows information to travel in 3D and is capable of storing up to 1,000 times more data as compared to currently available microchips. Data stored in the 3D microchip can not only move from left to right but can also move between the layers of the metals stacked horizontally in the chip. Describing today’s chips as bungalows where everything happens only on one floor, the researchers have said that they have created “stairways allowing information to pass between floors.” Made out of layers of cobalt, platinum and ruthenium atoms digital information is stored in cobalt and platinum atoms and the ruthenium atoms are used to communicate the information between the layers.
NASA

Submission + - NASA: Feb. 15 asteroid fly-by will buzz Earth closer than many satellites (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "NASA says an asteroid about half the size of a football field will blow past Earth on Feb 15 closer than many man-made satellites. NASA added that while the asteroid, designated 2012 DA14 has no change of striking Earth, since regular sky surveys began in the 1990s, astronomers have never seen an object so big come so close to our planet."

Submission + - Pushing back against licensing and the permission culture (tieguy.org)

kthreadd writes: Luis Villa has an interesting discussion on the topic of not licensing at all, what he calls POSS or Post Open Source Software. With a flood of new hackers flocking to places like GitHub which doesn't impose any particular requirements for hosted projects, the future of Open Source may very well be diminishing. Skip licensing, just commit to GitHub. What legal ramifications will this have on the free and open source community going forward?
AI

Submission + - IBM's Watson going to college for Web science, artificial intelligence (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "IBM today said it would be installing its super-smart cognitive Watson supercomputer at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, making it one of the first university's to receive such a system. With 15 terabytes of memory, the Watson system at Rensselaer will store more information than the system that famously won the Jeopardy! television show in 2011 and will let 20 users access its computing power at once."
Businesses

Submission + - The 787's Problems Run Deeper Than Outsourcing (hbr.org)

TAGmclaren writes: The Harvard Business Review is running a fascinating article exploring the issues facing Boeing's Dreamliner. Rather than simply blaming outsourcing, as much of the commentary has been focused on, the article delves into the benefits of integration and how being integrated when developing a new product gives engineers more degrees of freedom. From the article: "Historically, Boeing understood that, and had worked with its subcontractors on that basis. If it was going to rely on them, it would provide them with detailed blueprints of the parts that were required — after Boeing had already created them. That, in turn, meant that Boeing had to design all the relevant pieces of the puzzle itself, first. But with the 787, it appears that Boeing tried a very different approach: rather than having the puzzle solved and asking the suppliers to provide a defined puzzle piece, they asked suppliers to create their own blueprints for parts. The puzzle hadn't been properly solved when Boeing asked suppliers for the pieces. It should come as little surprise then, that as the components came back from far-flung suppliers, for the first plane ever made of composite materials... those parts didn't all fit together. Time and cost blew out accordingly.

It's easy to blame the outsourcing. But, in this instance, it wasn't so much the outsourcing, as it was the decision to modularize a complicated problem too soon."

Government

Submission + - DARPA wants electronics that can dissolve or burst apart after use (networkworld.com) 2

coondoggie writes: "he Mission: Impossible TV show famously started most episodes with a tape recorded mission message that ended with: "This tape will self-destruct in 5 seconds, good luck Jim." Then it melted down in a burst of smoke and flame.
DARPA researchers seem to want to take that sort of destructive notion quite a few steps further by designing electronics — particularly smart phones and other devices — that can melt or at least partially dissolve to the point that they would be useless to anyone else who came across them."

Businesses

Submission + - Microsoft alum: Windows 8 "a much deadlier assault weapon" than Windows 7 (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "Windows 8 is just what Microsoft needs to take advantage of the ongoing irreversible shift from PCs to handheld devices including iPads, iPhones and other form factors yet to be designed, according to the company's former OEM chief. Just as Windows 7 won instant popularity after the debacle of Vista, Windows 8 is poised to capture business from phone and tablet leaders such as Apple, only to greater effect, says Joachim Kempin, former Microsoft senior vice president in charge of OEMs who worked for the company from 1983 to 2002."
Entertainment

Submission + - The IEEE Gadget Graveyard: What technology will bite the dust in 2013? (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: "In this high-tech world paper still rules, but gadgets that run movies, television or music exclusively could die off in 2013. That's one of the conclusions published by the giant professional organization, IEEE, recently in its 2013 Gadget Graveyard survey. The survey is a Facebook application where more than 1,700 IEEE members, engineers, engineering students and CES trade show attendees cast more than 25,000 votes on what sorts of technology they think will die off by year-end, like landline phones and Ethernet cables but mostly which will live on like standalone cameras."

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