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Comment Re:jerk (Score 1) 1440

Latin/Greek seems like overkill. Why not just use Prolog, or some other logic programming language? Then you'd get the benefits of unambiguous propositional logic, the familiarity of English, and the ability to perform automated queries on the law. Propositional logic is much easier to teach than Latin/Greek, and would probably be beneficial to cover at some point during primary/secondary education anyway.
For an example of how this might work, see the classic 'Colonel West sells missiles to Nono' example. (slide 17 here).

Comment Re:GMA 600? Last years Atom? $200?!? (Score 1) 214

The ethernet on the Raspberry Pi is provided via a USB-to-ethernet chip.[1] USB devices on the Raspberry Pi have been known to give all sorts of problems when there is insufficient power,[2] which was likely to happen if one powered it using a standard compliant hub which only provided 500 mA instead of the requisite 700 mA. Since the network connection was provided via USB, it was also affected.

Citations:
[1] http://www.raspberrypi.org/faqs#Why no Gigabit Ethernet?
[2] http://elinux.org/RPi_Hardware#Power_Supply_Problems

Comment Re:NOT machine learning (YAMH) (Score 1) 250

From the article:

This isn't like a machine learning task where we collected a limited corpus of real data and then we're trying to make statements about our ability to perform on future data, yet-to-be-collected.

My (rather limited) understanding of it is that within the field (i.e. to people who actually know what they're talking about), the phrase 'machine learning' refers to the above case; using a training set of real data to develop a model, then applying that model to real problems.

In contrast, Remy takes a (stochastic) traffic model, rather than raw data, which would make it a different kind of AI.

Comment Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (Score 1) 438

Last week I let apt-get install it for me, since they finally had a Linux version available.

Unfortunately, the Linux version is only suitable for running games native to Linux (as far as I am aware), which is at present pales in comparison to the number of games for Windows. Running Steam under Wine is the easiest way of getting said games to work, especially when you consider the difficulties associated with DRM.

Comment Re:It'll do a lot for pre-installed Linux too... (Score 2) 438

When I moved from XP to Ubuntu 7.04, I had to get wine up and running for WoW. I had to switch a bunch of config files to make it use OpenGL. I had to adjust a bunch of settings to turn off poorly supported features. Then WoW worked.

Given that 7.04 was half a decade ago, you might want to use a more up to date example.
Last week I installed Steam under Linux. It was as simple as './winetricks steam'. Admittedly, I still had to know to use winetricks and download a more recent version of it, but that's a significant improvement over 5 years ago, especially as all you need to know for any piece of software now is:
a) use (the latest version of) winetricks
b) check the Wine AppDB if it still doesn't work

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