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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 10 declined, 2 accepted (12 total, 16.67% accepted)

Hardware

Submission + - AI Releases Linux-based Hybrid Netboot/Tablet/MID (alwaysinnovating.com)

rdnetto writes: After 6 months of delays, AlwaysInnovating has released their newest device, a netbook with a touchscreen and detachable wireless keyboard. The screen also houses a secondary screen that can be removed and used as a mobile internet device. The device uses the TI Cortex A8, has 768 MB of RAM, and 19.5 Ah of batteries.
Software

Submission + - Software is Licensed, Not Sold (eff.org)

rdnetto writes: In a major blow to user rights, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has issued a decision that will go a long way toward ensuring that software buyers will rarely be software owners.
In a triumph of legal formalism over reality, the Court held that the copyright’s first sale doctrine – the law that allows you to resell books and that protects libraries and archives from claims of copyright infringement – doesn’t apply to software (and possibly DVDs, CDs and other “licensed” content) as long as the vendor saddles the transfer with enough restrictions to transform what the buyer may think is sale into a mere license.

Submission + - EFF Wins New DMCA Exceptions (eff.org)

rdnetto writes: The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) won three critical exemptions to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) anticircumvention provisions today, carving out new legal protections for consumers who modify their cell phones and artists who remix videos — people who, until now, could have been sued for their non-infringing or fair use activities.

Submission + - Pirate Party to Run Pirate Bay from Parliament (torrentfreak.com) 2

rdnetto writes: After their former hosting provider received an injunction telling it to stop providing bandwidth to The Pirate Bay, the worlds most resilient BitTorrent site switched to a new ISP. That host, the Swedish Pirate Party, made a stand on principle. Now they aim to take things further by running the site from inside the Swedish Parliament.

The party has announced today that they intend to use part of the Swedish Constitution to further these goals, specifically Parliamentary Immunity from prosecution or lawsuit for things done as part of their political mandate. They intend to push the non-commercial sharing part of their manifesto, by running The Pirate Bay from ‘inside’ the Parliament, by Members of Parliament.

Submission + - POLL: Which continent do you live in? 1

rdnetto writes: POLL: Which continent do you live in?
        North America
        South America
        Antarctica
        Africa
        Europe
        Asia
        Australia
        I don't live on Earth, you insensitive clod!
The Courts

Submission + - Pirate Bay Judge Accused of Bias

rdnetto writes: One of the biggest cases in file-sharing history ended last week with The Pirate Bay Four sentenced to huge fines and jail time. Today it is revealed that far from being impartial, the judge in the case is a member of pro-copyright lobby groups — along with Henrik Pontén, Monique Wadsted and Peter Danowsky. There are loud calls for a retrial.
http://torrentfreak.com/pirate-bay-lawyer-is-biased-calls-for-a-retrial-090423/
Businesses

Submission + - Part of Copyright Act Ruled Unconstitutional

rdnetto writes: From http://techdirt.com/articles/20090403/1619494384.shtml:
A year and a half ago, we were quite surprised when the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals actually sided with Larry Lessig, concerning how a part of copyright law that pulled foreign works out of the public domain was potentially unconstitutional. This was in the "Golan case," the third of three big copyright cases Lessig had championed. The appeals court had sent the case back to the lower court, and that lower court has now decided that, indeed, a trade agreement (URAA) that pulled foreign content out of the public domain is unconstitutional as it violates the First Amendment. While it may seem narrowly focused, this is the first case that has successfully challenged a part of copyright law as being unconstitutional. The ruling will almost certainly be appealed, so it's not over yet — but it's still a rare and important win for those who are fighting to keep copyright law from destroying the public domain.

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