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Media

Submission + - Patenting the Photoshop Process (photographybay.com)

hawridger writes: Scott Kelby's 7 Point System for Adobe Photoshop CS3 is due to release on October 19th and sounds really promising. So promising, in fact, that he's applied for a patent on this "7 Point System." If a patent issues, will readers be forbidden from discussing the techniques on forums, blogging about it, posting youtube videos of the "system" in action? Is there a license to "use" the patent included with the purchase of the book? This seems like a big dang deal for photographers and anyone else that uses Photoshop (or any other image-editing software for that matter). This could open a huge can of worms in the photography/digital illustration industry.
Networking

Submission + - Will Your Home Network Survive After You're Gone?

glhturbo writes: I have a small home network that includes a wireless access point, wired and wireless network clients, a shared NAS, and Linux (mine) and Windows (wife and two kids) computers. I also have a Linux-based firewall PC in the mix. I'm a bit concerned that if I get hit by a bus, my non-technically-inclined-wife will have to try to figure this stuff out, especially the NAS, which has ALL of our data on it (pictures, music, etc), but has EXT3 formatted drives. Short of trying to keep some kind of living document for all of this, does anybody have suggestions for "survival plans" and/or "rescue plans" for their data and network in case of incapacitation or death?
XBox (Games)

Submission + - Halo evolution (gamespot.com)

Jynx writes: "Gamespot is running a great feature with comparisons between all 3 Halo games. Weapon, environment and vehicles models are all compared side by side and it really highlights how far the franchise has come since its original release on the Xbox. FTA — "The original Halo map designs made for confusing gameplay because many of the levels had rooms that looked, for all practical purposes, identical. Halo 2 helped alleviate the endless corridor problem by adding more room variation. But Halo 3 has solved the problem altogether by making every room, hallway, and outdoor area unique. You'll rarely get confused as to which way you're supposed to go. Indoor areas have better lighting and textures, while outdoor environments have much more foliage. Water, whether in a river or an ocean, looks vastly better.""
Security

Submission + - Picture theft through hole in Google's Picasa (heise-security.co.uk)

devkhadka writes: "The finders of the URI holes in Firefox and Windows are now targeting Google. In their blog, Billy Rios and Nate McFeters have described how attackers may steal all pictures organised using Google's picture gallery software Picasa from users' hard disks: It seems that they were able to load pictures from a PC onto a manipulated web server by combining various attack methods, such as cross-application scripting, cross-site scripting, URI tricks and a flash with ActionScript."
Hardware Hacking

Submission + - First quantum chips made

holy_calamity writes: The first quantum computer chips have been made by two US groups, New Scientist reports. Both NIST and Yale demonstrated chips where information was transferred between two superconducting qubits using a 'quantum bus'. The bus is made from a cavity that traps a single microwave photon as a standing wave — the NIST group also managed to use the bus to store data from one qubit for a short time.
XBox (Games)

Submission + - The Halo Bug (washingtonpost.com)

Woody writes: The Washington Post reports... Halo 3 Takes Toll on Workforce

Call it the Halo holiday, or the Halo bug.

Some gamers are going to be a little sleepy this week at work or school, if they show up at all. With yesterday's release of Halo 3, the highly anticipated video game for the Xbox 360 console, many gamers are taking some personal time. "In my group of friends, we're all taking the day off," said one Halo fan waiting in line late Monday night at a GameStop store in Rockville.

Security

Submission + - Unisys investigated for covering up cyberattacks

Stony Stevenson writes: Unisys, a major government IT contractor, reportedly is being investigated for allegedly failing to detect cyberattacks, and then covering up its failings. Two US congressmen have called for an investigation into cyberattacks aimed at the Department of Homeland Security, along with a contractor charged with securing those networks.

In the letter they say the House Committee on Homeland Security's investigations led them to believe the department is under attack by foreign powers, and could be at risk because of "incompetent and possibly illegal activity" by a U.S. contractor. The congressmen didn't name the contractor in the letter. However, the Washington Post on Monday reported that the FBI is investigating Unisys, a major information technology firm with a US$1.7 billion Department of Homeland Security contract, for allegedly failing to detect cyber break-ins traced to a Chinese-language Web site and then trying to cover up its deficiencies.
Music

Submission + - Music industry wants credit card nums in ID3 tags (michaelrobertson.com)

An anonymous reader writes: In an obituary for AnywhereCD which closes in one week, MP3.com founder Michael Robertson chronicles how at least one record label wanted him to put credit card numbers of buyers into songs. Fascinating story about how at least some of the labels still don't get it and why AnywhereCD is about to buried.
Patents

Submission + - Company selling IP rights to P2P spoofing on eBay (ebay.com)

tuomasr writes: "A Finnish software company Viralg is selling their IP rights to their software that provides "the necessary key technology for the only possible effective protection against illegal P2P sharing" on eBay. The company claims that the software can create fake files for P2P-networks with hashes identical to the real files, hence feeding garbage to the download."
Biotech

Submission + - Velociraptor had feathers (physorg.com)

Spy der Mann writes: "A new look at some old bones have shown that velociraptor, the dinosaur made famous in the movie Jurassic Park, had feathers. A paper describing the discovery, made by paleontologists at the American Museum of Natural History and the Field Museum of Natural History, appears in the Sept. 21 issue of the journal Science."
Sony

Submission + - Folding@home Petaflop Barrier Crossed (playstation.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Folding@Home project has now passed the astounding 1 Petaflop barrier. The project run from Stanford University owes much of its success to the PlayStation 3 which joined the fight earlier this year. Around 80% of the total projects processing power is from the PS3 alone, outpacing the linux community by 22x despite having a similar user base working on project. With the recent introduction of the GPU clients 2 Petaflops wont be to far away.
OS X

Submission + - Workplace Shell replacement for Mac OS X?

Qbertino writes: I'm proud owner of an older 12" G4 iBook (1,0 Ghz) from a few years ago, the one many geeks have and liked to use because of it's price/performance ratio for a subnotebook. Many people I met use it to run Debian Linux PPC or some other OSS operating system and do their programming on it. However I mostly do web developement where the OS hardly matter and I've come to like the benefits of running the native OS and the neat and frictionless hardware integration that comes with it. I do quite a lot of Flash developement aswell and need to be able to use the official Flash IDE from Adobe. The downside is that the desktop bogs down the systems performance which I'd like to use for other things by running a replacement of the Aqua Workplace Shell & desktop enviroment. There are quite a few wps replacements for windows — I've use Litestep with Windows 2000 — but I'm looking for one for OS X. What lightweigth WPS replacements are there for OS X and what other strategies are there to take some weight off an OS X desktop?
PlayStation (Games)

Submission + - Dualshock controller with Rumble feature released (hdtvinfo.eu)

xbox360cooldown writes: Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. (SCEI) announced that it would release DUALSHOCK®3 Wireless Controller, a new controller for PLAYSTATION®3 (PS3®) incorporating a rumble feature.

http://www.hdtvinfo.eu/news/game-consoles/sony-introduces-dualshock-controller-with-rumble-feature-for-the-ps3.html

In Japan in November as a separately sold accessory. It inherits the basic design and functionality of the popular PlayStation® controller, while keeping the high-precision, high response motion sensitive six-axis sensing system. Introduction to North American and European markets is expected in spring 2008.

The added rumble feature, combined with the highly realistic motion sensitive six-axis sensing system, takes gamers deeper into the world of interactivity, delivering a more intuitive, realistic and immersive game play experience. The new controller will also benefit PS3 content creators, by giving them the ability to further expand their creative imagination. PS3 titles that are already in the market may become compatible with the rumble feature through software update.

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