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Comment Re:One Down (Score 1) 321

No. I'm saying a single-digit (or double-digit, for that matter) list of "commandments" doesn't make for any sort of functional morality for an actual grown-up type person.

And it was modded down, too. Are there actually simpletons out there who thought I was condoning rape, torture, and murder? (I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you were breaking balls in the finest snarky /. tradition)

Submission + - No, the Earth (almost certainly) won't be hit by an asteroid in 2032

The Bad Astronomer writes: Last week, astronomers discovered 2013 TV135, a 400-meter wide asteroid that will swing by the Earth in 2032. The odds of an impact at that time are incredibly low — in fact, the chance it will glide safely past us is 99.99998%! But that hasn't stopped some venues from playing up the apocalypse angle. Bottom line: we do not have a good orbit for this rock yet, and as observations get better the chance of an impact will certainly drop. We can breathe easy over this particular asteroid.
Government

Report: Fisker Automotive Sold To Hong Kong Billionaire Richard Li 35

cartechboy writes "It looks like an investor group led by Hong Kong tycoon (and early Fisker investor) Richard Li is the likely winner of a government loan owed by Fisker Automotive, the dormant maker of plug-in hybrid sports cars. Buying the loan would allow Li to try and restructure the company even as it's still at risk for bankruptcy. The originally company won a $529 million government loan in 2009, took venture capital investment, and created a lot of buzz around its flagship car, the $100,000 Karma plug-in hybrid. But the company had delays launching the car, struggled financially and has not built any cars since July of 2012. Is Li the new savior?"
Government

Report: Fisker Automotive Sold To Hong Kong Billionaire Richard Li 35

cartechboy writes "It looks like an investor group led by Hong Kong tycoon (and early Fisker investor) Richard Li is the likely winner of a government loan owed by Fisker Automotive, the dormant maker of plug-in hybrid sports cars. Buying the loan would allow Li to try and restructure the company even as it's still at risk for bankruptcy. The originally company won a $529 million government loan in 2009, took venture capital investment, and created a lot of buzz around its flagship car, the $100,000 Karma plug-in hybrid. But the company had delays launching the car, struggled financially and has not built any cars since July of 2012. Is Li the new savior?"

Comment Re:Bullshit we won't notice (Score 4, Insightful) 466

My knees already run into the back of the seat in front of me.

The most reasonable measure of airplane seating would be a tuple: the distance from the seat to the seat back in front - the latter in both in upright and reclined mode.

I'm an inch shorter than you, and frankly I'd rather sit on a metal chair with no cushioning and humanitarian leg room than a cushioned seat with no leg room.

Heaven forbid there's ever an accident - tall people will probably wind up with fractured femurs or hips or both. No safety specs on that?

Submission + - Overcoming Racism in Cinema... From the Technical Side (washingtonpost.com)

barlevg writes: Since the birth of film, shooting subjects of darker complexion has been a technical challenge: light meters, film emulsions, tone and color models, and the dynamic range of the film itself were all calibrated for light skin, resulting in dark skin appearing ashy and washed-out. Historically, filmmakers have used workarounds involving "a variety of gels, scrims and filters." But now we live in the age of digital filmmaking, and as film critic Ann Hornaday describes in the Washington Post, and as is showcased in recent films such as "12 Years a Slave," "Mother of George" and "Black Nativity," a collection of innovators have set to work developing techniques in lighting, shooting and post-processing designed to counteract century-old technological biases as old as the medium itself.

Submission + - Overcoming Racism in Cinema... From the Technical Side (washingtonpost.com)

barlevg writes: Since the birth of film, shooting subjects of darker complexion has been a technical challenge: light meters, film emulsions, tone and color models, and the dynamic range of the film itself were all calibrated for light skin, resulting in dark skin appearing ashy and washed-out. Historically, filmmakers have used workarounds involving "a variety of gels, scrims and filters." But now we live in the age of digital filmmaking, and as film critic Ann Hornaday describes in the Washington Post, and as is showcased in recent films such as "12 Years a Slave," "Mother of George" and "Black Nativity," a collection of innovators have set to work developing techniques in lighting, shooting and post-processing designed to counteract century-old technological biases as old as the medium itself.
Classic Games (Games)

Full Screen Mario: Making the Case For Shorter Copyrights 361

barlevg writes "A college student at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute spent nine months meticulously remaking Super Mario Bros. based on the latest web standards. His project is open source and the code freely available through Github. The site recently gained widespread media attention, which unfortunately brought it to the attention of Nintendo, which has requested that the site be taken down. In a column on the Washington Post website, tech blogger Timothy Lee makes the case for how this is a prime example of copyrights hindering innovation and why copyright lengths should be shortened. Among his arguments: copyrights hinder innovation by game designers seeking to build upon such games, and shortening copyright would breathe new life into games who have long since passed into obsolescence."
Classic Games (Games)

Full Screen Mario: Making the Case For Shorter Copyrights 361

barlevg writes "A college student at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute spent nine months meticulously remaking Super Mario Bros. based on the latest web standards. His project is open source and the code freely available through Github. The site recently gained widespread media attention, which unfortunately brought it to the attention of Nintendo, which has requested that the site be taken down. In a column on the Washington Post website, tech blogger Timothy Lee makes the case for how this is a prime example of copyrights hindering innovation and why copyright lengths should be shortened. Among his arguments: copyrights hinder innovation by game designers seeking to build upon such games, and shortening copyright would breathe new life into games who have long since passed into obsolescence."

Comment Re:Good! It's not a religion (Score 1) 321

"Good! Now maybe people will begin to see the others as stupid too!"

The odds are stacked against you - about 47% of the human population lacks a paracingulate sulcus, the brain structure most responsible for differentiating reality from imagined reality (as a consequence of memory processing). Somewhere over 90% of schizophrenics lack this structure, which lends credence to the theory of an evolution of consciousness and a natural origin of religions.

There appears to be a moderate evolutionary advantage to having the sulcus - we'd expect the presence of one to be lower in antiquity, but if we figure a halving in 10,000 years, you're going to be waiting a long time until it's a tiny minority.

Comment Re:A.k.a shell scripts (Score 1) 268

You scoundrel! You can do pipes in Perl! Tsk, tsk, tsk!

it's not too bad if you don't care about getting the result back. I recently implemented an actual pipe-based system in perl where the results did need to be bidirectional, with open3, and ... well, it ain't pretty.

It's a real shame perl doesn't have the capability integrated into the core language with nice syntactic sugar.

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