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Submission + - NSA knew about heartbleed two years ago

Ric Aubern writes: So what we guessed was the case seems like it actually was according to this Bloomberg story. Can you say "separation of powers"? Very interesting is the article's bias against open source by describing the Internet's integrity as depending "on a small number of underfunded researchers who devote their energies to the projects."

Submission + - Bloomberg News: NSA has been using HeartBleed for years (bloomberg.com)

jasonla writes: We all knew this was coming, right? From the article:

"The U.S. National Security Agency knew for at least two years about a flaw in the way that many websites send sensitive information, now dubbed the Heartbleed bug, and regularly used it to gather critical intelligence, two people familiar with the matter said."

Submission + - Yes. The NSA did know about, exploit Heartbleed (bloomberg.com) 1

squiggleslash writes: One question arose almost immediately upon the exposure of Heartbleed (Original Slashdot story), the infamous OpenSSL exploit that can leak confidential information and even private keys to the Internet: Did the NSA know about it, and did they exploit if so? The answer is "Yes". Bloomberg reports that "The agency found the Heartbeat glitch shortly after its introduction, according to one of the people familiar with the matter, and it became a basic part of the agency’s toolkit for stealing account passwords and other common tasks." Some National Security experts are upset about this, given the same flaw could just as easily be used by foreign governments against Americans as vice versa.

Submission + - The US nuclear weapons complex in disarray, disrepair, and perhaps dissolution (thebulletin.org)

Lasrick writes: Kennette Benedict on the severe problems that plague the US nuclear weapons labs (Sandia, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, Oak Ridge, etc.). A main issue is the privatization of these labs. As NNSA director Bruce Held put it, 'I don’t think we need national laboratories to aspire to be the low-cost producer of widgets. I don’t think that’s why national laboratories exist...What we need national laboratories for is to take on really hard technical challenges that are facing our nation and our national policymakers—take on high-risk, hard problems that involve too much risk for the private sector to honestly support.' Good read.

Submission + - US takes out gang that used Zeus malware to steal millions (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: The US Department of Justice today charged nine members of a group that used Zeus malware to infect thousands of business computers with Zeus malware and illegally siphon-off millions of dollars into over-seas bank accounts. The DoJ said an indictment was unsealed in connection with the arraignment this week at the federal courthouse in Lincoln, Neb., of two Ukrainian nationals, Yuriy Konovalenko, 31, and Yevhen Kulibaba, 36. Konovalenko and Kulibaba were recently extradited from the United Kingdom.

Submission + - Cost Skyrockets for United States' Share of ITER Fusion Project (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: ITER, the international fusion experiment under construction in Cadarache, France, aims to prove that nuclear fusion is a viable power source by creating a "burning plasma" that produces more energy than the machine itself consumes. Although that goal is at least 20 years away, ITER is already burning through money at a prodigious pace. The United States is only a minor partner in the project, which began construction in 2008. But the U.S. contribution to ITER will total $3.9 billion—roughly four times as much as originally estimated—according to a new cost estimate released yesterday. That is about $1.4 billion higher than a 2011 cost estimate, and the numbers are likely to intensify doubts among some members of Congress about continuing the U.S. involvement in the project.

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