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Comment Re:Queue the slashdot Nokia/MSFT hating. (Score 1) 186

I refute your claim that NS was trying to support standards any more than IE was, and assert that they were trying harder to deviate from standards.

Netscape tried to push their own tag which was needed for overlapping elements in that browser (nothing else worked with z-index), a small violation of the HTML spec, and a huge violation of the CSS spec. They also didn't support any units except px, and sometimes %. Stylesheets wouldn't render at all if you turned off javascript. As others have said, it's an ugly horrible mess of a browser.

IE 5/6 were the best browsers at the time. The problem is when they ran out of competition they quit spending money, disbanded the IE team, and left things to stagnate for years - but without competition why would a company innovate? They are not a hacker group making the internet better for fun, they're a publicly traded company vying for the most market share.

Comment Re:LMAO (Score 1) 95

No no, lets hear him out.

See ... um ... poor people are addicted to TV and can't just go cold turkey on it. Pay-per-view television doesn't have advertisements (I've never actually seen pay-per-view , so that's an assumption), and advertising convinces people to spend money. So poor people need pay-per-view television content to satisfy their addiction and not get the overwhelming need to spend money on magic bullets.

Comment Re:Application and Screen on Different Machines (Score 1) 455

The main advantage, as far as I'm aware, of to having a network transparent display server over a client like RDP is that you can send raw drawing commands over the wire instead of bitmaps, but that advantage is lost when the display server is drawing images.

The secondary advantage that is sometimes touted is that the application itself can be drawn on the remote server rather than the entire desktop, but there are workarounds for this that don't involve network transparency at the display server level. (Recent versions of the RDP protocol support this, though Windows doesn't ship with a client that uses it.)

That said I believe my actual comment was simply suggesting that RDP/VNC are not as different from network transparency in the display server as it might otherwise be when the display server is copying images (because that's what VNC does as well, just at another layer.)

Comment Re:The SW analogy was some insulting geek panderin (Score 1) 867

Yeah, I started on Corel as well. On a computer without internet, didn't stick with it for too long, though my mom liked the mahjong game that came with it.

So
1. Corel Linux in 2001.
No linux 2002 until 2005
2. Debian ( 1 year)
3. Ubuntu ( 1 year)
4. Gentoo (2006-2010)
5. Fedora ( 1 year)
6. Arch Linux (current)

Comment Re:Not Hasbro's Game of Life (Score 1) 50

I don't know, as a child I had a competitive multiplayer version of Conway's Game of Life that was pretty fun.

Actually I wish I remembered what it was called. Each player could place a number of cells, then a configurable number of rounds pass and you can place again. The goal being to wipe out all the other players cells. Different colored cells would participate with each other for suffocation, and iirc for replication it would match the majority of the neighbors.

Comment Re:Its Carmack! (Score 2) 635

Carmack didn't add a third dimension to the world, he came up with a way of making it run fast enough for a twitch shooter on early 90s computers, but Ultima Underworlds was earlier and more 3D than Wolfenstein (it had up and down, and jumping - but was kinda slow and clunky on the hardware of the day.) And there was the 80s turn based 3d that was popular in Wizardry etc.

Comment Re:Game Nostalgia Thread (Score 1) 218

I think my favourite was Sid Meier's Pirates!, played that game all night on several occasions.

Someone else in this thread mentioned Archon. That was one original creative board game. I also liked the sequel Archon 2: Adept, though it lost a bit of the simplicity that made the original brilliant.

Jumpman I felt was overrated, but I really liked a similar platformer called Ultimate Wizard, which included a level editor and some neat tricks.

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