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Comment Re:Unlikely (Score 2) 177

By your standards, bread is the same density as dough, and swiss cheese the same density as... regular cheese :) Face it - sometimes the holes in the structure of the material are relevant, and will affect the overall density (and the fact that they are uniformly distributed is relevant, which excludes your tent). Even ice has a lower density than water because of "tiny holes" in its structures (actually, these "holes" are increased spaces between the atoms making up the ice).

Comment Re:An unfair comparison (Score 1) 406

Absolutely. The air is just one big tube.

However, I wonder if it would be faster to just dump a bunch of carrier pigeons on a truck instead and transfer the data that way?

As opposed to just dumping the memory cards in the truck? (which somehow seems... simpler :) )

"Never underestimate the bandwidth of a station wagon full of tapes hurtling down the highway." - Tanenbaum, Andrew S. (1996)

Comment Re:Net neutrality anyone? (Score 1) 122

CEF (Cisco Express Forwarding) and MPLS [wikipedia.org] (Multiprotocol Label Switching) use flow control. The perform a lookup on the first packet, cache the information in a forwarding table and all further packets which are part of the same flow are switched, not routed, at effectively wire speeds.

It's more than that. The older techologies ("fast switching" in the Cisco world) used to do this - route first packet, then switch the other packets in the flow. However, CEF goes one step forward, and allows for all the packets to be switched by the hardware (not even the first packet in the flow hits the router processor). Which means that what the author seems to be suggesting would actually mean moving backwards.
Either there is more to the router than the article says, or the author hasn't been keeping track of developments in this field...

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