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Education

Submission + - T. rex was relatively slow, lumbering animal (msn.com)

Lucas123 writes: "A new study found that the typical T. rex was a relatively slow animal running at no more than 25mph, 20 miles an hour slower than the 45mph we often seen depicted in movies such as Jurassic Park, and its inertia would have kept it from turning quickly — even slower than a human being. "We now know that a T. rex would have been front heavy, turned slowly and could manage no more than a leisurely jog," said team leader John Hutchinson of the Royal Veterinary College."
Sony

Submission + - Sony: Children Should Power Their Own Toys (ecogeek.org)

hankmt writes: "Looks like Sony is developing a line of digital devices including a digital camera, a video recorder and maybe an MP3 player for kids that will be powered by the 'boundless energy of children by having them generate electricity through cranking, rolling, and twirling their gadgets.'"
Operating Systems

Submission + - Learn how Linux manages memory one slab at a time

Anonymous Coward writes: "Good operating system performance depends in part on the operating system's ability to efficiently manage resources. In the old days, heap memory managers were the norm, but performance suffered due to fragmentation and the need for memory reclamation. Today, the Linux kernel uses a method that originated in Solaris but has been used in embedded systems for quite some time, allocating memory as objects based on their size. This article explores the ideas behind the slab allocator and examines its interfaces and their use."
Intel

Submission + - Intel Discrete Graphics in 2008? (hothardware.com)

Chandon Seldon writes: According to Hot Hardware, Intel has entered negotiations with graphics card manufacturers to make mid-range discrete graphics cards based on Intel graphics chipsets. It looks like AMD has a deadline on actually providing Open Source 3D drivers (or at least programming documentation) — once Intel starts competing they really don't want to be stuck playing catchup like they are on CPUs.
PC Games (Games)

Submission + - 25 Things You Didn't Know About World of Warcraft (wanderinggoblin.com)

Stinkerbelle writes: "Think you know everything about World of Warcraft? Think again! The guys at WanderingGoblin.com recently attended Blizzard's South Korean gaming conference, and spent every waking moment talking to a rather large variety of developers, execs, employees, and PR people. The result is quite an amusing list of factoids, trivia, insights, and scoop into the world's biggest online game. The tidbits they've uncovered are, obviously, not the kind of thing you'd find in an official press release, and make for an amusing write-up of the game."
Hardware Hacking

Submission + - Laptop CPU turbocharged with one button (gearfuse.com)

bob82 writes: "The MSI GX600 is being dubbed the world's first Turbobook. Why, you might ask, would they call it a Turbobook? Well, what about the neat little overclock button that kicks the CPU speed up a notch when your computer is in AC mode (and by notch we mean 20%) for when you really need your computer working overtime."
Music

Submission + - Interview with Jonathan Coulton (techtalkforfamilies.com)

techtalkforfamiliesd writes: "Dale from Tech Talk for Families recently interviewed Jonathan Coulton, rock star of the Internet, contributing troubadour for Popular Science (PopSci) Magazine, and dad. Jonathan talks about his decision to go from code monkey to musician and how fatherhood and his unique career complement each other and how he juggles the two."
Security

Submission + - Microsoft's IIS is Twice as Likely to Host Malware (windowsitpro.com)

eldavojohn writes: "According to Google, Microsoft's server software is at least twice as likely to host viruses or malware. The reason why? "Google reports that IIS is likely used to distribute malware more often than Apache because many IIS installs are on pirated Windows versions which aren't configured to automatically download patches. (Even pirated Windows versions can automatically received security fixes, however.) "Our analysis demonstrates how important it is to keep web servers patched to the latest patch level," Google notes.""
Power

Submission + - Powering 60W lightbulb at a distance (bbc.co.uk)

Yet another Anonymous Coward writes: BBC reports that at MIT, "US researchers have successfully tested an experimental system to deliver power to devices without the need for wires. The setup, reported in the journal Science, made a 60W light bulb glow from a distance of 2m (7ft). "
Announcements

Submission + - New York Jumps into Open Formats Fray (infoworld.com)

cyrusmack writes: "Hot on the heels of the bad news regarding the defeat of all open formats bills (erroneously reported by the mainstream media as "ODF" bills), New York has become the latest in an area that has seen a flurry of activity already this year. In the article on InfoWorld, it's pretty clear that this bill is significantly watered down from what other states have attempted to do this year. You can Microsoft will be there in force, just as it has been elsewhere."
Microsoft

Submission + - Vista not playing well with IPv6?

netbuzz writes: "Early adopters of Microsoft Vista are reporting problems with its implementation of IPv6, according to Network World. Example: "We are seeing a number of applications that are IP-based that do not like the addressing scheme of IPv6," says one user. "We will send a print job to an IP-based printer, and the print job becomes corrupted. We're seeing this with Window's Vista machines. When IPv6 is installed, this happens without fail. As soon as we remove IPv6, all of our printer functions return to normal."

http://www.networkworld.com/news/2007/060707-micro soft-vista-ipv6-incompatible.html"
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - The Universal Calculator

e ^ (i * pi) writes: "Ever want to find the airspeed of an unladen swallow? Want to know the value of (4 * 7 + green) / apple? Someone has finally taken it upon themselves to create a calculator not bound by the ordinary limits of mathematics which refrains from limiting you to old fashioned "traditional" calculations. It even has a great documentation: "For numbers, this behaves pretty much as you would expect. For other types, not so much.""

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