Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Security

Submission + - Digg.com Accounts Compromised

An anonymous reader writes: There is a cross-site scripting vulnerbility on the registration page of popular social networking site Digg.com. The hole allows cookies and sessions of logged-in users to be hijacked, compromising the account. The exploit can be triggered simply by a user clicking a maliciously-crafted link. A full explanation and sample exploit code is available here
Bug

Submission + - World's most expensive train ticket?

BeerCat writes: The UK National Rail site can search for journeys between different destinations, and will also display the likely fare. Unless, the journey is from Oxford to Hawarden (about 170 miles by road, according to Google Maps), travelling tomorrow from 08:00, in which case the fare will be £179,769,313,486,231,570,000,000,000,000,000,000,0 00,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 ,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,0 00,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 ,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,0 00,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 ,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,0 00,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 ,000,000,000.00

The site even notes "We are sorry, but we couldn't find any First Class tickets available. You can try searching in different times or dates for available First Class tickets". Which is probably just as well.
Biotech

Submission + - The mystery of vitamin B12 finally solved

Roland Piquepaille writes: "You probably think that scientists know everything about the common and essential vitamin B12, the only vitamin synthesized by soil microbes. In fact, one part of this biosynthesis has puzzled researchers for at least 50 years. But now, MIT and Harvard biologists have solved this vitamin puzzle by discovering that a single enzyme known as BluB synthesizes the vitamin. So what is the next challenge for the researchers? It's to discover why the soil microorganisms synthesize the vitamin B12 at all, because neither them — nor the plants they're attached to — need it to live. Read more for additional references and a picture of BluB."
Math

Submission + - Scientists solved huge theoretical problem

BoredStiff writes: The Weekend Edition of NPR Scientists have solved one of the toughest problems in mathematics, performing a calculation to figure out the symmetry of a 248-dimensional object known as the Lie group E8. The solution is so large that it would take days to download over a standard Internet connection. Lie groups were invented in the 19th century by the Norwegian mathematician Sophus Lie [pronounced LEE], to express the symmetry of three-dimensional objects like spheres, cones and cylinders.
IBM

Submission + - FORTRAN is officially dead

slowbad writes: John W. Backus, who died last week at 82, led the team at IBM that created the programming language Fortran in the early '50s.

The story has received wide coverage in the general press for FORTRAN being the first widely used higher level computer language — which is commendable since the media usually covers more well-known biographies like the voice of Thurston Howell III and Mr. Magoo
Math

Submission + - MIT Simplifies the 248th dimmension by solving E8

robacarp writes: "After three years of dedicated work researchers at MIT solved the 110 year old E8 math problem — thus simplifying the 248th dimension. The solution "took researchers two years of 'pencil and paper' work and one more for software writing before the solution could be tackled by computer" and produced "a file 60 gigabytes in size" in "77 hours on the Sage supercomputer." Sadly the article also puts it in terms we can understand: "The calculation created a file 60 gigabytes in size, enough to store music that could play for 45 days in the MP3 format."

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&si d=abM.SNM8uq3c&refer=us"

Slashdot Top Deals

"Protozoa are small, and bacteria are small, but viruses are smaller than the both put together."

Working...