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Comment Re:Studying Abroad, or studying Computer Science? (Score 1) 386

I'm (hopefully) going to be in a similar situation as you in a year. [...] Nothing in the english/spanish world has the same opportunities in CS as the US, with few exceptions.

So let me summarize:

  • you haven't actually been anywhere outside the US (assumption, yes, but most likely a valid one), in particular you did not *study* in Europe (for example),
  • yet you say that the "opportunities in US" are unparalleled.
  • given this last statement, I can safely say you also did not bother to compare (1) the curricula of some US/ other (English, let's say) universities, (2) career chances after finishing some specific non-US universities.

This is, yes... reasonable. And so non-surprising.

Comment Re:data/voice usage balancing (Score 1) 570

That's the reason for the pricing model. SMS has to be priced high enough to make sure its use doesn't grow faster than voice.

No, that's not true. The sole reason for SMS prices is the economy, i.e. how much the carriers think they can charge the users. Since SMS usage is not falling (it's growing, actually), they see no reason for lowering the prices.

Comment Re:makes sense, meh (Score 1) 576

If Lego's products are better, they'll win on quality and be worth the price. Or perhaps the general public doesn't value the difference, in which case the public gets what it wants. This is capitalism working well: competition, with competitors competing on quality and price and consumers having options.

No.

First of all, you did not consider the fact that the general public is often unaware of the quality difference; what the general public sees is (1) the price, (2) the ads saying that (in this case) "our bricks are just like Lego, just cheaper"; any serious thoughts about quality usually come several years later (and it's usually way too late for the original company which is floating belly up by that time). In general, it's naive to think that competitors really compete on the quality plane.
Lego is a perfect example of this; actually, given the current price of these toys, it's a low hanging fruit every toy producer in the world is or has been thinking of.

And, don't get me wrong: I think Lego (the company behind it) deserves a good ass-kicking, if not for the exorbitant prices (that I doubt is only high enough to make up for the high quality), then at least for the dumb marketing practices (who the fsck needs Star Wars sets with only a handful of bricks, most of them custom at that? where are the generic bricks?).

I am just pointing out that it has nothing to do with "beneficial" effects of capitalism.
And, Lego is unlikely to survive it, at least as we know it today.

Internet Explorer

Submission + - Microsoft's Silverlight & "Priority Boost&

terry0100 writes: We have noticed that Microsoft's "Silverlight" IE control boosts the priority of the hosting IE process to "Above Normal". This is probably done to enhance the graphical experience.

But we also noticed that you cannot modify it. The Silverlight control actively keeps the IE process at "Above Normal" in the operating systems scheduler. You can reduce the process priority, but the Silverlight control will simply boost the host IE process up again. This has killed several laptops by exhausting the battery because the user could not stop the IE process in question.

IMHO, I feel that this is a very poor design decision. Enforcing their idea of what priority the process should run at is borderline virus like behavior.
Privacy

Submission + - Protection from Quantum Cryptanalysis?

An anonymous reader writes: We frequently hear how present computer security depends on the difficulty of prime factorization, which quantum computers perform instantly. Already we see a trickle of news stories showing progress on developing quantum computers and predictions of when the researchers will produce a useful computer. At that time, anyone will be able to decrypt intercepted or cached encrypted data such as credit card, medical, backups, and personal communications. Which ciphers depend on prime factorization? Are there ciphers which a classical computer can encrypt/decrypt but which a quantum computer cannot break? How do you envision the switchover occuring?
Hardware Hacking

Submission + - Recommendations for GPS receivers and APIs

WillMcIver writes: "Many GPS receivers exist and their associated APIs. I am interested to know developers' opinions about current GPS receiver offering from the standpoint of ease of use for application development. Thanks, WJM"
The Courts

Submission + - Why does Slashdot use the DMCA?

An anonymous reader writes: The Digital Millennium Copyright Act contains a controversial provision. Website owners can protect themselves from monetary damages for the copyright infringement of users by registering a service provider agent and taking down materials when a copyright holder notifies the that agent. Website owners can boycott this controversial provision of the DMCA very easily by not registering an agent. Surprisingly, Slashdot is not a boycotter. Browsing through the U.S. Copyright Offices Directory of Service Provider Agents for Notification of Claims of Infringement reveals that Slashdot.org has had a registered agent since 2000. Why doesn't Slashdot.org take a stand and boycott this hated provision of the DMCA?
Networking

Netgear Introduces Linux-Based NAS Devices 128

drewmoney writes "A LinuxDevices.com article introduces several of Netgear's Linux-based NAS devices, technology they acquired with the purchase of Infrant earlier this year. (Here is Netgear's product page.) There are models from 1.5 TB, at about $1,100, to 4 TB, topped by a 4-TB rack-mount version. They are geared towards the professional home user and small and medium businesses. The NAS devices come complete with the usual RAID features, file-system access, and a built in USB print server. All are controlled through a Web GUI and some even offer SSH access."
User Journal

Journal Journal: XML Predictions

This article outlines interesting new developments regarding XML. Check out in particular the blurbs on XProc, APP, XQuery.
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft Commits Auditory Mayhem

Hell Square Residents Association writes: "A Zune branded SUV — promoting Microsoft's Zune media player — rolled through a densely populated (and trendy) residential area in Manhattan. They proceeded to pump music from a competition grade car stereo into the neighborhood, while parked in front of a bar at 3AM. The incident was caught on camera. Residents of the area are outraged and start a website. The residents are organizing and calling for restitution from Microsoft for the massive disturbance of peace. They even suggest playing loud music at Microsoft's HQ during a work day. Thank you for your help in spreading the story."
Software

Submission + - eLibrary - an ebooks collection manager

Allad writes: "Hi. I just found this software. It is called eLibrary. It is an application meant to help you organize your ebooks collection. If, like me, you prefer electronic versions of books and you have a bunch of them, then you got to check this out. It does it all : ebooks indexing, table of content retrieval, ebook metadata and cover image downloading... And last but not least it's a freeware. You can get it on this website : http://www.ycsoft.org Enjoy"
Networking

Submission + - Dreamhost down nearly 24 hours, thousands affected

dgtlmoon writes: "Following a planned power outage that went for an unplanned amount of time due to some burnt out cables discovered during the maintainence dreamhost.com hosted websites are down, some estimates are between 100,000 and 250,000 domains are affected, further-more when the power came back on they found a bunch of core routers to be dead and are having difficulty resuming normal operations, this is issue is just about to tick over to 24 hours open."
Security

Submission + - What Makes For Good Bank Security?

An anonymous reader writes: West Coast Bank recently enacted a new set of security measures to their login system augment their previous username & password only system. The new enhanced login security system(PDF) uses a scheme of cookies to identify known computers, and additional personality questions such as asking users about their favorite food in order to identify users coming from unknown computers. Upon first glance this seems to be an effectively trivial system that can be defeated by stealing cookies or personality answers, while still making the system harder to use for flaky customers such as myself that don't keep consistent answers to personality questions. However as I don't belong to any other banks I have no idea of how this compares to how other banks handle their security. Compared to other banks, is this system any good or is my bank just giving me the flim-flam on security in lieu of a real security system?
Television

Award-Winning Ad Taken Off Air In Australia 471

bol_kernal writes "An award-winning advertisement on Australian TV for the new Hyundai 4WD has been pulled from being broadcast after stations received 80 complaints from concerned parents. The ad consists of a small child, age around 2 years, cruising down the road, window down, arm out the window, in his new Hyundai 4WD. He sees a girl of the same age standing on the side of the road, pulls over picks her up, and they go to the beach together. All in all it's cute, funny, and very well done. The ad aired late in the evening (8:30 pm or later), but it was pulled due to concern from parents about the copycat risk. What I want to know is, where has the responsibility of parents gone? Is the world becoming so serious — or so frightened — that fantasy is no longer allowed?"

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