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Comment Re:You can use Gmail + Penango! (Score 1) 158

For example, if you want to use your Gmail account with military-grade security that neither NSA can read, just install Penango in your browser and send messages encrypted - this solution is also used by US military and corporations. Penango does not hold any of your private information and/or your keys - so they can not be forced by anybody to give out your secret.. simply because they do not have it!!!! For more info, go to http://www.penango.com/

Except that penango is not really compatible with any current browser releases except Internet Explorer. Firefox is supported, but only up to version 20. The current release is version 23.

Comment Re:Why not WebP? Or straight video? (Score 1) 246

From the kickstarter page:

What about WebP?

Comparing WebP to APNG is like comparing Apples and Oranges. WebP is an up-and-coming web oriented image format from google. Part of the WebP standard mentions animation. WebP however does not currently have anything more than a sample implementation, and WebP will probably never be backported to older devices and software and may never be ported to a lot of software that already supports PNG. This means that if you start using WebP now you can expect a lot of people to not be able to view your images at all - whereas with APNG they will at worst simply see the first or fallback frame.

WebP solves different issues and has a variety of features, such as lossy compression profiles and filters that simply don't apply to PNG and will not be part of the simple APNG standard [though it could be noted these features and more were in MNG]. APNG and WebP are simply different, and though they solve some of the same problems they are not really competing formats. Ideally we'd like to see wide spread adoption of both formats on just about everything in the future - but we can have and use APNG right now.

Comment Re:quite a few browsers? (Score 4, Informative) 246

From the Kickstarter page:

What about MNG?

If APNG is a screwdriver MNG is a Swiss Army Knife with all sorts of little tools, one of which being a screwdriver head that is sort of awkward and difficult to use. MNG has a lot of compelling features that sound great but the reality is all these features made MNG difficult to implement. MNG isn't a simple [screwdriver] "frame based" format. Instead it has a bunch of small embedded tools [Swiss Army Knife] to create animations. For example it contains individual image objects/sprites and these are manipulated through some sort of animation instruction system that is embedded in the image - and variations of sprites are stored as delta fragments, and there's additional support for these fragments to be in transparent JPG which is a questionable standard on its own and seems self defeating in a PNG based standard...? If you want just a frame based animated image APNG does the job and is simpler, if you want a complex format that has individual image fragments and scripted action then SVG+SMIL is your solution; MNG is too complex to outdo APNG and too inflexible to outdo SVG+SMIL.

Comment Re:RSA is outdated, but... (Score 1) 282

Advances in computation power alone will never break encryption. Ever. There is no boundary. An encryption can always just create larger keys.

Incorrect for the most part. First, algorithms that used fixed length keys, such as DES, can and do fall to increases in computational power. Second, even with algorithms that use a variable length key, improvements in computational power can break it. If I can capture an encrypted file today, it may be that in five years I can brute force that file open due to computational advances. There is nothing that you can do to increase the key length once I have a copy of the file. The important thing when choosing a key length is to make sure that by the time such an attack is feasible, the data protected is no longer valuable. The only exception that I can think of is a One Time Pad. No amount of computational power can help decrypt a OTP in theory. Implementation is always a different story however.

Comment Re:Proofreading @ Xerox Development? (Score 2) 290

How could Xerox make copiers for this length of time and not have a proofreading algorithm that works with a super-resolution scan & no interpolation to "machine check" the final commercial copier as a way of quickly finding errors?

Internatlly(sic), Xerox engineering had to know they were "correcting" pixels, rather than just "copying" them, so how did they verify their software?

They do know about it.

Comment Two things to be aware of (Score 1) 116

First, be aware that this project uses the Flexible Funding model. This is not like kickstarter; even if they don't reach their funding goal, any contributions you make still go to them. It's not an "all or nothing" deal like people are used to with kickstarter.

Flexible Funding

This campaign will receive all funds raised even if it does not reach its goal. Funding duration: August 03, 2013 - September 10, 2013 (11:59pm PT).

Second, there seems to be a bit of a contradiction on the timeline for this funding. The developers mention the following:

Our goal is to fund two to three man-years of full time work on Mailpile, with our first milestone in January 2014, when we will deliver an alpha version ...

Yet later they say (emphasis mine)

This is the Mailpile business model. As long as members of our community are willing to fund development (we will ask you to renew your membership in a years' time), we will dedicate ourselves to Mailpile and build the secure web-mail client you want.

Regardless of these inconsistencies, If they stick to the schedule then there should be a stable 1.0 release out during the first year of funding/development.

Following our alpha release, we will spend another 6-9 months fixing bugs, fleshing out features, responding to user feedback and getting the user interface translated to languages other than English. Our goal is to have a stable 1.0 release ready in the summer of 2014.

Comment Re:Carrier Lock Not That Big An Issue (Score 1) 207

I dunno what time frame you're talking about but for me pre-paid has been $40-50/mo for unlimited stuff (similar to your quote) but a comparable plan with contract was 90/mo. So even with a free iPhone or comparable device I still saved quite a bit by switching to pre-paid.

The part about the contract plan that really bites is that the rate doesn't go down once your contract is fulfilled and your subsidized phone is theoretically paid up. Unless you take some form of action, you will continue to pay that same $90/mo. I wonder how many months, on the average, customers continue to pay this high rate before getting a new subsidized phone or switching carriers.

Comment Re:Carrier Lock Not That Big An Issue (Score 1) 207

I agree with you that most people won't care. However, if that were my iPhone 5, I would have sued Sprint immediately had they refused to unlock it.

No, just port your number to a different provider with a new subsidy and sell off the practically new iPhone for a profit. If they try to come after you for ETF just tell them to suck it. They breached the terms of the contract, making it null and void.

Comment Re:Carrier Lock Not That Big An Issue (Score 1) 207

It has very little to do with iPhones being locked. How many people want to use a 3 year old iPhone when you're at least 2 models behind and a 3rd is about to be released?

I just sold my old iPhone 4 for more than I paid for it after using it all throughout the subsidy, so I guess at least one person wanted it.

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