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The Courts

RIAA, Safenet Sued For Malicious Prosecution 337

DaveAtFraud writes "Tanya Anderson, the single mother from Oregon previously sued by the RIAA — which dropped the case just before losing a summary judgement — is now suing the RIAA and their hired snoop Safenet for malicious prosecution. (Safenet was formerly known as MediaSentry.) Anderson is asserting claims under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act and the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization Act. A reader at Groklaw has already picked up that she is seeking to have the RIAA forfeit the copyrights in question as part of the settlement (search the page for '18.6-7')."
Music

Submission + - Is the CD Becoming Obsolete? (audioholics.com)

mrnomas writes: So, what's to blame for the declining CD sales? Is it that manufacturers are putting out more and more "safe" (read: crap) music while independent musicians are releasing online? Is it because iTunes is now the third larges music retailer in the country? Or is it just that CD's are becoming obsolete?

"Glancing at a report on Forbes.com this morning, there was an article showing that CD sales are expected to be down 20% 2008 (slightly higher than the 15% drop initially predicted). Why such a drop? What's truly happening is a gradual shift away from physical media to downloadable formats. What this indicates, so far, is that US sales of digital music will be growing at an estimated rate of 28% in 2008, however physical sales will drop even further, resulting in a net overall decline."

Security

Submission + - Fresh Security Breaches at Los Alamos (msn.com)

WrongSizeGlass writes: MSNBC is reporting on two new security breaches at Los Alamos. Officials at the nuclear-weapons laboratory, already struggling to calm concerns over security lapses, now have two more breaches to explain. Both of these latest incidents where 'human error' on the part of employees including an e-mail containing classified material sent over the open Internet, rather than through the secure defense network and a vacationing employee's laptop containing government documents of a sensitive nature and an encryption card advanced enough that its export is government-controlled being stolen from a hotel room in Ireland. It seems we will always be our own worst enemies when it comes to IT related security.
Patents

Submission + - Patent Peer Review (ieee.org)

dannyboyumd writes: "The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office begins an unprecedented experiment this week that will allow you (yes, you!) to review software patent applications. The USPTO is hoping the wider community of programmers and engineers will do a better job of spotting bad claims and thereby prevent innovation-killing legal tussles.

For the full story- http://spectrum.ieee.org/jun07/5275"

Education

Intelligent Design Ruled "Not Science" 1497

blane.bramble writes "The Register is reporting that the UK government has stated there is no place in the science curriculum for Intelligent Design and that it can not be taught as science. 'The Government is aware that a number of concerns have been raised in the media and elsewhere as to whether creationism and intelligent design have a place in science lessons. The Government is clear that creationism and intelligent design are not part of the science National Curriculum programs of study and should not be taught as science.'"
Businesses

Submission + - FDA Considering Allowing Fake Chocolate

Anonymous Coward writes: "First, they replaced our cane sugar with icky, fattening high-fructose corn syrup. Now, the "great American chocolate bar" may soon be made of fake fillers so big candy companies can shave more profit off the cocoa bean.

This New York Times Op-Ed (registration maybe required) describes how "Industrial confectioners have petitioned the Food and Drug Administration to be able to replace cocoa butter with cheaper fats and still call the resulting product 'chocolate.' The reason: the substitution would allow them to use fewer beans and to sell off the butter for cosmetics and such."

The issue is not whether it would be legal for them to make it this way... this is America — they can do what they want. The issue is whether it would be legal for them to package the fake chocolate AS chocolate (and not something like "diluted chocolate substitute — contains 10% actual chocolate") so that consumers wouldn't know the difference (before tasting it). Kids would ultimately be eating this stuff. Could Corporate America really go so far just to squeeze more out of a buck?"
Businesses

Submission + - Anheuser Busch has USDA changing 'Organic' (organicconsumers.org)

paulevans writes: "Anheuser Busch, Wal-Mart and other for-profit corporations have seeked and are getting a definition change on '95% Organic'. Such a change would allow for Anheuser Busch to "sell its 'Organic Wild Hops Beer' without using any organic hops at all".

Other changes would allow "sausages, brats, and breakfast links labeled as "USDA Organic" '..' to contain intestines from factory farmed animals raised on chemically grown feed, synthetic hormones, and antibiotics."

It is amazing how powerful the almighty dollar really is."

Businesses

New York Sues Dell for Poor Customer Service 295

Phanatic1a writes "New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo is suing Dell, alleging bait and switch financing tactics, false advertising, and 'numerous other deceptive business practices relating to their technical support services, promotional financing, rebate offers, and billing and collection activity.' According to Cuomo himself, 'At Dell, customer service means no service at all.'"
Software

Submission + - Open Sourced Icons?

Xailor writes: Can one assume that graphical icons that accompany free/open software applications are also thus free/open according to their license? Is it an acceptable practice to `share' icons from one application with another? For instance, a free web site employs icons from OSS projects as its look and feel.

Is this violating the nature of OSS if those icons are available for download to the public and for use elsewhere as long as those icons (a small fraction of a software project) comply with the appropriate licensing agreements? Can an icon be part of a `library' in an LGPL case?

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