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The Courts

Submission + - Lawsuit alleging false copyright claims 1

An anonymous reader writes: Last month, Slashdot published an item, http://yro.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=07/07/14/17 19250&from=rss, about the growing problem of false copyright claims, http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id =787244#PaperDownload. Today, the Computer & Communications Industry Association, a trade organization representing Google, Microsoft, and other giants, has filed a consumer protection complaint with the FTC against Hollywood studios, the NFL, and major book publishers for including overly broad copyright notices on their products. The Wall Street Journal has the scoop: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB118593806790484425 .html?mod=googlenews_wsj
Sci-Fi

Submission + - Mayor of San Diego Hates Comicon Attendees (pinkraygun.com)

Lisa Fary writes: "As we all know, 2007's Comicon International in San Diego ended this past weekend. Comicon is probably San Diego's largest, 4-day revenue generator, but that didn't stop the Mayor of San Diego, Jerry Sanders, from stating "We've put up the superheroes and now we're on to the people with actual talent." on the Cantore in the Morning show on 91X, the Monday morning AFTER the convention ended (presumably, when he thought that any of those pesky comics and sci-fi geeks were safely out of earshot). It's actually a pretty crappy thing to say about any group that brings such large amounts of hotel, restaurant, parking, transportation and retail revenue in to the city Can you imagine if something similar were said regarding almost any other group?"
Businesses

Submission + - Adblock plus users "accused" of stealing (mozilla.org) 1

derrida writes: "There is this Firefox Add-on called Adblock plus that promises (and delivers) removal of "all those ads and banners on the internet that often take longer to download than everything else on the page". And there is also an ongoing debate whether this is stealing or not. Quoting two different views:
"Do you have a devise that automatically blocks all commercials on television.[?] There's a difference between ignoring commercials and blocking them." and
"My a** it is [stealing]! If your going to argue I'm taking something from you by not waiting for your ads to load, I'm going to argue you are "stealing" bandwidth.".
Going one step further some web developers released scripts that blocks Adblock (watch the oxynoron!).
How is really slashdot going to react if Adblock plus is heavily used by its readers?"

NASA

Submission + - NASA building largest single-kernel Linux system

wellingj writes: NASA and SGI are building a new Linux super computer that contains a total of 1024 Dual-Core Intel Itanium 2 processors, resulting in 13.1 TFLOPs. This computer would rank as the 64th fastest computer. As some may know, 1024 cores is the current max for SMP (symmetric multiprocessing) support. SGI has therefor developed the necessary modifications and submitted them upstream.
Privacy

Submission + - MPAA: Plagarism good, Piracy bad? 1

BillGatesLoveChild writes: The MPAA is fast to complain about their Intellectual Property being violated, but have no qualms about violating the Intellectual Property of others. The SMH reports another case of a Hollywood Studio plagarizing a film as their own. Adam Sandler's I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry (2007) is a tale of two firemen who pretend to be gay to get domestic partner benefits. Curiously Paul Hogan's Strange Bedfellows (2004) made three years earlier, is also a tale of two firemen who pretend to be gay to get domestic partner benefits. Universal Studios issued a statement claiming "the similarities are purely coincidental". The producers of "Strange Bedfellows" are amused but not convinced.

This isn't the first time, with similar accusations being made against Spielberg's Julie Newmar (1995) vs Priscilla (1994) and Eddie Murphy's "Coming to America" which the courts found was stolen from writer Art Buchwald. Add to that "Hollywood Accounting" fleecing artists (The Forest Gump movie didn't pay the author a cent in royalties), the Record Industry doing the same and the MPAA itself caught yet unrepentant for pirating movies. Before The Senate rushes off to do their bidding, shouldn't the MPAA and RIAA be ordered to clean up their own houses?
Christmas Cheer

Submission + - Russians dive under North Pole

An anonymous reader writes: Russia is to send a submarine under the Arctic, primarily for scientific exploration but also to enforce its claim on the area. Both the US and Russia are bickering over who owns the North Pole, perhaps because it's been theorised that a lot of oil might be found there.
Media

Submission + - BBC Trust Want iPlayer Mac And Linux Support: OSC (digital-lifestyles.info)

An anonymous reader writes: The iPlayer is a big thing for the BBC. The BBC boss called it "as significant as the release of colour TV!" Sadly, when it goes on public beta on Friday, it will only work if you have Microsoft everything, ie7, XP, WMP 11 and uses their DRM. The BBC Trust (that oversees all that the BBC does) went as far as saying that it would insist on platform neutrality in a meeting with the Open Source Consortium (OSC) yesterday.

The BBC Trust say it MUST support Linux and Mac. Hurrah.

Education

Submission + - Wikipedia corrects Enciclopaedia Britannica (wikipedia.org)

javipas writes: "Despite all the controversy about Wikipedia's work model, no one can argue the potential of a project that has demonstrated the usefulness of the "wisdom of crowds" concept. And that wisdom has been able to detect several mistakes on one of the most relevant references on human knowledge: the Enciclopaedia Britannica. All kind of data has been spotted as wrong, such as the birthdate of Bill Clinton or the definition of NP problems in Mathematics."
Security

Submission + - Oracle IP address = 9th in world for ssh hacking? (theregister.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: As voted for by servers which run the "denyhosts" software to block ssh brute-force password attacks:

http://stats.denyhosts.net/stats.html

A box (or group of boxes behind a proxy) at Oracle UK seems to have hit the top 10 of machines on the Internet for launching attacks on boxes which run SSH server software...

This would imply that not only has a computer (or multiple computers) at Oracle UK been compromised without them noticing, but the new owners have then spent the last 3 months using Oracle's bandwidth to hack other boxes elsewhere on the net.

http://denyhosts.sourceforge.net/

Not so hot for a company which "has built a reputation for delivering many of the industry's most secure solutions"

http://www.oracle.com/security/security-solutions. html

Communications

Submission + - Internet radio receives 11th hour reprieve (wired.com)

zerocool^ writes: "As I was only a few minutes into my first ever internet radio broadcast — and knowing that it might very well be my last — someone linked this story in IRC, letting us know that Internet Radio has been saved, or at least given a little breathing room. From the story: "The SoundExchange executive [Jon Simson, executive director] promised — in front of Congress — that SoundExchange will not enforce the new royalty rates. Webcasters will stay online, as new rates are hammered out." There is still more work to do — get caught up, call your representatives to let them know you support net radio, and stay tuned — literally and figuratively — for more info."
Businesses

Submission + - CEO used pseudonym to post on stock bboard (wsj.com)

jpallas writes: The Wall Street Journal reports that court filings by the FTC about Whole Foods' plan to acquire Wild Oats reveal an unusual detail: The CEO of Whole Foods regularly posted to a Yahoo! stock bulletin board under a pseudonym. His alter ego was feisty, to say the least, and regularly disparaged the company that he later decided to acquire. A former SEC chairman called the behavior "bizarre and ill-advised, even if it isn't illegal." This certainly raises questions about online rights to free speech and anonymity, especially when the line between free speech and regulated speech depends on who is speaking as much as what they are saying.
Privacy

Submission + - Credit industry opposes anti-ID theft method (yahoo.com)

athloi writes: "Lawmakers across the country — pushed by consumer advocacy groups — are mounting a counterattack. They have passed laws that allow consumers to freeze their credit, a surefire way to prevent thieves from opening new accounts or obtaining a mortgage in a consumer's name. Under a freeze, a consumer cuts off all access to his credit report and score, even his own. All lenders require that information, so no one can borrow money in the consumer's name until he or she lifts the freeze. It's simple, and it works. So, of course, it's under threat from the Consumer Data Industry Association, which represents the Big Three credit bureaus. They make millions gathering and selling consumer data. Freezes cut into that business.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/usatoday/20070703/cm_usato day/aweaponagainstidentitytheft"

Microsoft

Submission + - Gates' Generosity Under Investigation (lewrockwell.com)

vashfish writes: In a fit of irony, the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation is under investigation by the DoJ for being TOO generous. From the article:

"After the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation announced plans to donate five billion dollars to help rebuild libraries destroyed by Hurricane Katrina, the Department of Justice's Antitrust Division launched a formal investigation into the Foundation. Thomas O. Barnett, Assistant Attorney General, said in a press release that, 'The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the world's largest charity cartel, has overstepped its boundaries and entered into the realm of predatory pricing. How is FEMA supposed to compete with private charities?'"

Media

Submission + - Rupert Murdoch gets positive about free content (chicagotribune.com)

Amir E. Aharoni writes: "Media tycoon Rupert Murdoch considers purchasing the Wall Street Journal and says that free, quality, online content is a good business model. Quote: Spinning a `what if' scenario for Time magazine, Murdoch bet the Journal would be more profitable if it spent $100 million a year to employ top business writers and got rid of the presses, paper and trucks and put everything online for free."

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