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Programming

Submission + - Where are the C++ frameworks?

wandazulu writes: Objective C has Cocoa, C# has .NET, Java has its packages, and every scripting language has an extensive library of functionality for handling things like XML, HTTP, encryption, regular expressions, etc. So why is there no likewise unified library of functionality for C++? At this point I can pretty much count on having a standard template library for any C++ compiler I use on any platform, but that provides basic functionality, like containers and strings. Why is it that I have to write my own socket-based routines for getting a web page, or hashing a string, etc.? So why is there no unified framework for C++? Is it because it's not "owned" by a particular organization or person? Has anyone even attempted to create a library to rival Java's or Ruby's or Perl's or Python's....

File Sharing Ruled Legal In Spain 136

stupid_is writes "As a follow-up to a previous discussion a judge in Spain has ruled that under Spanish law a person who downloads music for personal use can not be punished or branded a criminal. This seems to be a teeny bit clearer than the first article, which points out that downloading is a civil, and not criminal, offense for individuals. The Spanish recording industry federation Promusicae is predictably a bit peeved, and says it will appeal against the decision." From the article: "The state prosecutor's office and two music distribution associations had sought a two year sentence against the man, who downloaded songs and then allegedly offered them on a CD through email and chat rooms. However, there was no direct proof he made money from selling the CDs. Justice Minister Juan Fernando Lopéz Aguilar says Spain is drafting a new law to abolish the existing right to private copies of material. Due to different regulatory regimes in Europe, the proceedings against file sharers differ greatly in each country. However, most European judges tend to take a harder stance on file sharing. Twenty two people in Finland were fined €427,000 last week for illegally sharing movies, music, games and software, while courts in Sweden also fined two men who had downloaded movies and music for personal use."

Comment Credit Card Security Impact (Score 1) 96

I can't help but wonder whether the payment card industry will adjust their security standards in the face of this kind of threat. Currently, the security standards stipulate that a credit card number has been sufficiently protected/destroyed if only the last four digits of the account number are kept. In the face of this kind of attack, would that be enough? All of a sudden, what information is left is being used to obtain whatever was missing.

I can see security requirements being adjusted in a couple of ways: First, require complete obliteration of the credit card account number when it is no longer needed. Don't even keep the last four digits. Second, require that various pieces of information be kept in separate logical or physical databases. If card numbers are stored separate from addresses and other personal information, it's one more barrier for an attacker to overcome.

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