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Comment Re:Abolish all patents and copyright (Score 1) 215

I've yet to hear a vaguely plausible defence for replacing copyright by contracts. I've also never seen the idea seriously forwarded outside of Slashdot discussion.

So you've missed the various pirate parties getting mandates in many European nations in some places even nationwide, not to mention two seats in the European Parliament.

Comment Re:The best part of the article is at the bottom (Score 1) 555

I'm sure that's where we're heading, but slowly. But there are some drawbacks selling directly to customers.

Dealing with whiny and irrational end customers can be a horrible experience. A company that can get away with it while still making money may very well feel that it's better to pay the overhead of a middleman. You also take a risk with your brand, if you don't spend enough on customer support, your brand is tarnished by that, even if your cars are solid.

Comment Re:Yawn (Score 1) 157

Actually, the GPU is much faster, by far, than any* DSP setup. The GPU consists of hundreds or thousands of DSP building blocks, although more limited in what they can perform and in which order.

* Naturally you can build out a DSP system to match the speed of a GPU, as you can build a rack of CPUs to outperform a single GPU. That's not my point.

Comment Re:As someone who has to deal with HIPAA Requireme (Score 1) 130

How do you even judge that something is "encrypted" if you are using a scheme that some grad student made up like a month ago?

This is a problem that has already been solved. The answer is: You treat it like it's simply "security by obscurity" and assume it will be broken any day soon. The sad fact is that this is true for most of the encryption schemes thought up over the years.

And honestly, if homomorphic encryption can't work with a well tested and analyzed encryption algorithm, I'm not sure I'm very impressed about it..

Comment Re:Read their website (Score 5, Informative) 268

Every file system is/should be labled "experimental" in a way. The long answer from the btrfs FAQ is pretty good, and makes some sense:

Long answer: Nobody is going to magically stick a label on the btrfs code and say "yes, this is now stable and bug-free". Different people have different concepts of stability: a home user who wants to keep their ripped CDs on it will have a different requirement for stability than a large financial institution running their trading system on it. If you are concerned about stability in commercial production use, you should test btrfs on a testbed system under production workloads to see if it will do what you want of it. In any case, you should join the mailing list (and hang out in IRC) and read through problem reports and follow them to their conclusion to give yourself a good idea of the types of issues that come up, and the degree to which they can be dealt with. Whatever you do, we recommend keeping good, tested, off-system (and off-site) backups.

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