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Comment Re:"More than" (Score 4, Informative) 62

The exact number is 3,507. I hope you're now able to sleep well at night.

...and if you're curious, that number is actually extremely low by the standards for this type of experiment; they didn't analyse anywhere near enough data. Metagenomics is supposed to take up gigabytes of disk space; the amount of usable data they got was around 37 MB.

Security

Ask Slashdot: Good Tracking Solutions For Linux Laptop? 253

First time accepted submitter WillHPower writes "So I have ordered a new Ubuntu-powered laptop. I spent some extra bucks on lots of RAM and a good sized solid state drive. After putting money into it, I'd like to find a way to track this laptop in case it's ever stolen. Are there any good tracking software/services the run on Linux laptops? Also, are there any other techniques besides tracking for dealing with a lost or stolen laptop that I should consider?"

Comment Re:Now taking bets... (Score 1) 214

In Canada, the politics of the Conservative Party take on many of the features of the governments of Bush and Reagan, which is why I use the label. I do not intend to imply anything to do with international relations or make any racial or religious accusations; while he does seem to hold a strong pro-Israel perspective, I don't consider this important, and I suppose in retrospect this is probably a misuse of the label on my part.

The comparisons I actually wanted wanted to draw were the following: he's been systematically secretive, created the largest deficit in the country's history, and suppressed environmental science. (He's also raised taxes for the poor and lowered them for corporations, and cut social services, but those aren't a neoconservative affectation as much as it's just regular old small-government conservativism.) And it's the secrecy that's really the issue; no one would ever believe that a Canadian government prior to Harper's would have the Machiavellian wit to organise an effective intelligence-gathering operation.

Comment Re:This is stupid (Score 1) 407

That latter part's really changed. At some point MS realised they could get spur adoption by localizing gobs of central Asian languages, and went overboard with expanding the list of supported languages. For the low, low price of a few naive interns, they can easily throw in a few new languages to please their shareholders. As far as maintaining a competitive product goes, it's largely busywork, since adoption is slow (?) and their existing markets are threatened, but it's an understandable mode of retreat for a company going through a midlife crisis where most of the key people have recently left.

Comment Re:head transplant, or body transplant? (Score 1) 522

The title of the article is "HEAVEN: The head anastomosis venture Project outline for the first human head transplantation with spinal linkage (GEMINI)."

I think the reasoning behind the nomenclature is from the surgeon's perspective: whatever part is smaller is being transplanted. After all, no one contests the term "brain transplant," which has been a figure of (mostly rhetorical and science fiction) speech for some time.

Comment Re:the way I see it (Score 1) 533

There's legitimacy in identifying it as a distinctive act—if someone sets off a bomb in a public place that is supposed to kill thousands of people, but by fluke it only kills one, you'd have to put the perpetrator down for... how many attempted murders? And of whom? Plus that ignores the possible property damage. The way the law is written, 18 USC sec. 2332a is more of a summary of damages, actual and potential, than some pigeonhole that crimes have to be sandwiched into. In the Tsarnaev case it was added on top of the murder charges. This is another crime separate from those acts.

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