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Technology (Apple)

Submission + - Hacker Community's iPhone Unlock Tested, Works (playingwithwire.com)

Siker writes: "Playing With Wire has tried the newly released Unlock software by the iPhone Dev Team on a new iPhone. The verdict is that it works and that it works well, if with some effort: "if you feel confident with your technical abilities, and you don't feel confident in AT&T's cell phone abilities, this is the tool you've been waiting for.""
Mozilla

Submission + - whyisfirefoxblocked.com cracked (whyisfirefoxblocked.com) 2

Merk writes: On Friday there was an article about someone starting a campaign to block Firefox users. Their justification was that Firefox users were more likely to block ads, and that by blocking ads, they were thieves, stealing from website developers.

Well, sometime over the weekend the site was altered, presumably by someone cracking in. The text on the page now gives a Firefox fan's reasoning why someone might want to ban the browser. (Image of page, first seen on Digg)

The Internet

Submission + - Cleversafe ready to release GFS alternative (playingwithwire.com)

Siker writes: "Playing With Wire has a recap of Cleversafe's presentation at LinuxWorld. 'Cleversafe separates data into slices that can be distributed to different servers, even across the world. But it's much more than just slicing and dicing: the algorithm adds redundancy and security as it goes about its task. When the algorithm is done, each individual slice is useless in isolation, and yet not all slices are needed to reconstruct the original data.' This kind of software can lead to higher data availability without the overhead of the Google File System."
PHP

Submission + - Definitive Guide to symfony Review

Siker writes: "Playing With Wire has a review of the book accompanying symfony's 1.0 release. Symfony is a PHP web development framework, similar to Ruby on Rails, and was recently made famous as Yahoo! used it for one of its services. One of the book's authors, François Zaninott, comments on the review in the comments section."
The Courts

Submission + - I violated copyright law. Now what?

An anonymous reader writes: I am US-based and have recently been doing part-time subcontracting work for a friend in the UK who runs her own small marketing firm. She sells a complete branding/identity plan and if that includes a web site refresh, she calls me. The clients do not know who or where I am, or even that the work is being subbed. Like many designers, I often use Corbis and other photo merchants to mock up layouts for review. It is legal to download images ("comps") from Corbis to use offline for the this purpose. If the client likes the design/images, I get a quote from the photo vendor and the client has the option to purchase. If the price is too high, which it often is with Corbis, I turn to less expensive or free alternatives.

One of her clients, for whom I recently designed a site, just received a $25,000 invoice from a law firm in London representing Corbis, who claimed their content was on the client's site. The client of course was frantic when they received the bill and called my marketing friend, who called me. I investigated and sure enough, there were images on the site that were rightfully the property of Corbis, which I put there. In this instance I neglected to swap out the comps with legal images I purchased for the client from another online source before I made the site live. As a designer I respect content rights and did not, would not, maliciuosly steal images. The client and my friend had no idea.

I moved quickly to correct the situation — scrubbed the site and looked through other clients' sites to make sure nothing else had gotten through. I called Corbis and told their legal department what happened and they told me I would have to deal with the law firm, who handles "all our overseas affairs." I then sent a certified letter to the law firm telling them what happened in an attempt to exonerate the client, and by default, my friend. That was today.

I quoted the images in question on the Corbis site and the total would have been about $800. I did my due-googling and in the spectrum of copyright infringement, I want to believe I'm closer to the speeder than I am the serial-killer. Other photo houses (Getty) send out cease and desist letter and it's done. There is mention of similar situations on some forums, especially in the UK, but I can't seem to find any precedent as to what my fate might be. Does anyone have any idea? I made about $1,000 for the site about a year ago, and as much as it would pain me, would be willing to give that up to make this go away. But something tells me this is going to get ugly.
Music

Submission + - Pianist's Husband Admits Faking Recordings

bugg_tb writes: Earlier this month Slashdot reported on Gramophone Magainze's article about Joyce Hatto's music not actually being recorded by her....

It turns out that this appears to be correct as the BBC is reporting that her husband William Barrington-Coupe "began faking passages because Joyce Hatto, who had ovarian cancer, could be heard groaning in pain during recordings"
GNUStep

Journal Journal: Lose weight while you work 20

At the Mayo Clinic in Rochester they have developed "The Office of the Future". From the article:

Most visitors think they've walked into a gym.

The creator of the "Office of the Future" is quick to correct them.

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