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Journal Journal: Google Quietly Adds HTTPS Support to GMail 4

This may be old news, but I just noticed myself and thought I'd report it. I've been using the "New Version" of GMail for a couple of weeks (I hardly notice the difference from the "Old Version"), and happened to notice today that the inbox URL still used "http://", even after all the complaints that they didn't maintain "https://" after login. I decided a quick test was in order, and added the all-important "s" to the protocol indicator. It worked fine. After clicking around some, openin

Cellphones

Submission + - QR Codes: Internet to Cell Phone via Camera

An anonymous reader writes: From ITWorldCanada comes an article about a technology that will change the way people use their cell phones: "A Toronto-based software developer wants to bring Quick Response (QR) codes to Canada, and an industry analyst says this may appeal to companies offering products and services to youth." McDonald's restaurants in Japan having been using the codes for over a year to present nutritional information on the cell phones of their customers.

QR codes were originally developed by Tokyo-based Denso Wave Inc. and are common in Japan. When published in print form — on billboards, transit ads, vehicles or other media — consumers can then take pictures of the images and have them converted to links, phone numbers or other advertising messages. Luna Development, a Canadian mobility company, is introducing the technology to North America with a series of solutions to read the codes on current phones and a web-based application to generate the codes for manufacturers, advertisers and consumers.
Biotech

Submission + - Tree Frogs Inspire Reusable Superglue [pics] (scienceblogs.com)

grrlscientist writes: "Do you like to sneakily unwrap your gifts before Christmas to learn what they are? Well, scientists are helping you do this by developing a new reusable adhesive superglue!

From the story: The reason that conventional tape cannot be reused is because the adhesive forms permanent cracks when peeled from a surface. While these tiny cracks allow tape to be removed, they also render it useless. But a team of scientists, led by Abhijit Majumder at the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpur, India, discovered that the adhesive on the toe pads of tree frogs and crickets contain microscopic channels that prevent cracking when they are peeled from a surface."

Cellphones

Submission + - Japanese phone technology coming to North America

An anonymous reader writes: Canada's Globe and Mail newspaper brings us an article on a hot Japanese technology poised to break into the US and Canadian cell phone market.

QR codes look like a cross between a Magic Eye picture and a poorly-played game of Tetris, but they are actually scannable bits of information that function much like traditional bar codes. QR codes can appear in printed matter, such as newspaper or magazine ads, or on business cards or letterhead, or on actual objects. For example, McDonald's restaurants in Japan have been using QR codes for more than a year on their food wrappers, providing a link that sends customers to a website displaying nutritional information.

When a cellphone user snaps a picture of a QR code, it automatically triggers a response in the phone that can open a link to a website, dial a phone number or download an application. A Canadian company, Luna Development, is finally bringing this technology to the US and Canada.
Cellphones

Submission + - 2D barcodes bring Internet to your cell phone

An anonymous reader writes: QR codes look like a cross between a Magic Eye picture and a poorly-played game of Tetris, but they are actually scannable bits of information that function much like traditional bar codes. QR codes can appear in printed matter, such as newspaper or magazine ads, or on business cards or letterhead, or on actual objects. For example, McDonald's restaurants in Japan have been using QR codes for more than a year on their food wrappers, providing a link that sends customers to a website displaying nutritional information.

When a cellphone user snaps a picture of a QR code, it automatically triggers a response in the phone that can open a link to a website, dial a phone number or download an application. A Canadian company, Luna Development, is finally bringing this technology to the US and Canada.
Cellphones

Submission + - QR Codes coming to North America

An anonymous reader writes: Luna Development today announced the introduction to North America of Luna Blitzkap, a set of Quick Response (QR) code applications for devices based on Windows Mobile® software. QR codes are two-dimensional images similar to barcodes that allow mobile device users to capture a variety of information directly from a printed source with their camera-equipped mobile phone. The information can provide a link to a website or online service, automatically dial a phone number, exchange a business card, or run an application all by simply taking a picture.

Feed Undisclosed Data Breach Helped Enable Phishing Scam At University (techdirt.com)

Officials at Indiana University have concluded that a 2006 phishing attack against university members was made possible by an earlier breach of one of the university's main servers. This all came to light when one recipient of a phishing email -- a cybersecurity Ph.D. student -- wondered how an attacker could get his university email address, since he had never given it out to anyone. After requesting documents under the Indiana Public Records Act, the student discovered that the university had previously suffered an undisclosed breach, which is how the attacker obtained his information. This simple story underlines some important points. It shows that breaches aren't harmless; even if the stolen data isn't immediately used for direct fraud, it's likely to be used in other ways down the road. If stolen data can help a phisher do a better job of personalizing an email to make it look more legitimate, then that stolen data has value. The case also demonstrates the importance of disclosure. People whose data is lost need to be aware of it so that they can be on guard for fraud. When we hear about massive losses of data, such as the incidents at the Veterans Administration or TJ Maxx, it's easy to get lost in the staggering numbers and think of it all as an abstraction. But this incident shows, along with others before it, that breaches do have real consequences for the victims.
Software

Submission + - Guide Dogs and Making Babies - The New Gaming

ShrapnelFace writes: "Penny Arcade is reporting on a story that was first posted at Kotaku, but then taken down. Directing us to the same story regarding Peter Molyneux's interview about the upcoming title, Fable 2, we find a new dawn in gaming- Dogs and Babies.

http://www.gwn.com/news/story.php/id/11557/New_Fab le_2_Feature_Dog_Sidekick.html

A direct quote from Peter in this article:
[quote] "There is the appreciation the wide world feels toward your character as he lives and fights in their world. There is the ability to make love and make babies. Yes, you can be both a man or a woman and if you're a woman, you can get pregnant. A first, he believes, for a main character in an RPG."[/quote]"
Intel

Submission + - Intel to sample flash-killer PRAM this year

Station writes: Intel's new phase-change memory technology (PRAM) will begin sampling this year. Samsung, IBM, and Hitachi are all working on phase-change memory as a successor to flash as it has a lower (~20ns) read latency than flash (50-90ns). 'Intel says they plan to ship the first PRAM modules as a straight-ahead NOR flash replacement so that they can work the kinks out of the design before trying to move it up the memory hierarchy. The company claims a much higher number of read-write cycles (100 million) than flash, as well as a potential 10 years' worth of data retention. NOR flash is typically used as program storage memory for mobile devices like cell phones, while more durable but slower NAND flash is used for mass storage in devices like the iPod nano.'

Feed Gates Wants More Visas (wired.com)

Bill Gates asks Congress to reform the immigration system and let more highly skilled scientists and engineers into the country. In 27B Stroke 6.


Microsoft

Submission + - The Deal Steve Jobs Couldn't Refuse

Government Drone writes: "Remember the 1997 deal in which Microsoft bought $150 million in non-voting Apple stock? According to this story in InformationWeek, it wasn't done all out of the goodness of Bill Gates' heart:

Weeks prior to bailing out a struggling Apple Computer by purchasing $150 million of its stock, Microsoft officials threatened to cut development of a key product for the Macintosh in order to coerce its rival to make the deal, according to an e-mail unearthed during a recent court hearing.

The original text of the E-mail is here, which mentions a threat to pull the plug on Office for Mac, but argues against it for a variety of reasons. An interesting backend view of what was happening in Apple's darkest days."
PC Games (Games)

Submission + - S.T.A.L.K.E.R Gold

Aksel writes: "S.T.A.L.K.E.R shadow Of Chernobyl has gone gold, meaning it has finally been sent to the manufacturing plant. From the Offical website: "We are pleased to announce that the game has gone to print! The project developed by GSC Game World over 5 long years has finally crossed the finish line. We are sure that many of those, who discover the world of the Zone will "come down" with S.T.A.L.K.E.R. for a long time. Soon anyone will be able to explore the world of the technological catastrophe and the unsolved mystery. Mutants, monsters and anomalies, enemies and comrades, dangerous fights and exciting missions await you!" http://www.tothegame.com/game_news.asp?id=36"

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