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Role Playing (Games)

Submission + - Gamer sues gold farmers

navygeek writes: Tired of contending with gold farmers in Blizzard's online sensation, World of Warcraft, gamer Antonio Hernadez has filed a class-action lawsuit against gold farming outfit IGE.

The attorney representing Hernandez in the case, Richard Newsome, told The Escapist, "Guys like Tony [Hernandez, the plaintiff] have paid their $15 for some entertainment, and IGE is polluting that entertainment. It's kind of like, if someone pays for a ticket to go see a movie, and if someone else comes in behind them and kicks their seat, you can get them to stop doing that."
Details on the lawsuit may be found at Gamespot and The Escapist. The actual complaint can be found here, PDF warning.
Displays

Submission + - Man sues Gateway because he can't read EULA

Scoopy writes: California resident Dennis Sheehan took Gateway to small claims court after he reportedly received a defective computer and little technical support from the PC manufacturer. Gateway responded with their own lawyer and a 2-inch thick stack of legal docs, and claimed that Sheehan violated the EULA, which requires that users give up their right to sue and settle these cases in private arbitration. Sheehan responded that he never read the EULA, which pops up when the user first starts the computer, because the graphics were scrambled — precisely the problem he had complained to tech support in the first place. A judge sided with Sheehan on May 24 and the case will proceed to small claims court.

A lawyer is quoted as saying that Sheehan, a high school dropout who is arguing his own case, is in for a world of hurt: 'This poor guy now faces daunting reality of having to litigate this on appeal against Gateway...By winning, he's lost.'
Data Storage

Submission + - Top 20 Hard Disk Drive Myths Debunked

crazyeyes writes: "Hilarious and informative. How many articles are like that? I did think about putting it under It's Funny, Laugh.... until I saw two myths I thought was true. Yeah, I'm laughing at myself now.

This guide was written in response to the numerous fallacies about the hard disk that are still being propagated in many forum discussions. Although many articles have covered these topics, it is apparent that hard disk urban legends are still more popular than the simple truth. So, let's get down to basics and examine some of these common fallacies or myths and debunk them!
Take a look and see how many of these top 20 HDD myths you actually believed to be gospel?"
Patents

Submission + - Patent reform on the horizon?

Reivec writes: U.S. patent law, already shaken up by a Supreme Court ruling this spring, is facing its biggest overhaul in 50 years, amid a legislative battle that pits drug companies against some major players in the financial and high-tech sectors.

The battle's next round is in the Senate, where a committee is set today to consider legislation backed by Democratic and Republican leaders that would make patents harder to get and easier to challenge. It would also reduce penalties for violating them.
Role Playing (Games)

Submission + - WoW gamer files lawsuit against IGE

racton writes: The Escapist posted an interview with an attorney who has filed a consumer class action suit against IGE, the large in-game item trading company. The complaint states that selling virtual money is "polluting the entertainment" for players who pay for the World of Warcraft service. From the article:

TE: So what is the actual lawsuit — in layman's terms? RN: The actual lawsuit is Hernandez v. IGE. We filed it in Miami, where IGE has offices. In layman's terms, the core of the complaint is a consumer class action for unfair trade practices. Guys like Tony [Hernandez, the plaintiff] have paid their $15 for some entertainment, and IGE is polluting that entertainment. It's kind of like, if someone pays for a ticket to go see a movie, and if someone else comes in behind them and kicks their seat, you can get them to stop doing that. We're just trying to get IGE to stop kicking the seats. This is not unlike other consumer complaints where someone has paid for a service, and someone else is interfering with it. It's really very simple.
Space

Submission + - Riding an Ion Drive to the Asteroid Belt (nasa.gov)

Iron Condor writes: JPL is now close to embarking on another of its trademark, one-of-a-kind missions, this time to the heart of the asteroid belt: The Dawn mission is being prepared for launch this summer from Kennedy Space Center. Dawn will explore Ceres and Vesta, the two largest known asteroids in our solar system, which lie in the vast expanse between Mars and Jupiter. In the process, the mission will make history on several fronts. Besides being the first spacecraft to orbit a main-belt asteroid and the first to ever orbit two targets after leaving Earth, Dawn will be the first science mission powered by electric ion propulsion, the world's most advanced and efficient space propulsion technology.
Programming

Submission + - The Death Of A Software License (GPL) (bmc.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Death Of A Software License argues that Google's Greg Stein's "license pressure" is something that Richard Stallman and the Free Software Foundation should pay more attention to. If the FSF takes the GPL v3 in an opposing direction to the developers that gave the GPL legs in the first place, then we'll see an obvious outcome — the death of the GPL. Interesting blog post if nothing else.
Toys

Submission + - Scientists turn back time on mice skin cells (nature.com)

prostoalex writes: "Nature magazine is reporting that a team of scientists from Kyoto University has developed a technique to reprogram the aging skin cells into embryonic skin cells, effectively reversing aging in mice without cloning or stem cells: "If researchers succeed, it will make it relatively easy to produce cells that seem indistinguishable from embryonic stem cells, and that are genetically matched to individual patients. There are limits to how useful and safe these would be for therapeutic use in the near term, but they should quickly prove a boon in the lab.""
Portables

Submission + - Asus stuns Computex with £100 laptop (linuxdevices.com)

srinravi writes: According to linuxdevices.com, Asus chairman Jonney Shih sprang a surprise during Intel's Computex keynote today with the announcement of a $190 laptop.

The notebook measures roughly 120 x 100 x 30mm (WDH) and weighs only 900g. The notebook boots in 15 seconds from its solid-state 2GB flash drive. The huge auditorium then burst into applause as Shih revealed the astounding price tag. Dubbed the 3ePC, Shih claimed the notebook is the 'lowest cost and easiest PC to use'.

The notebook uses a custom-written Linux operating system, much like the OLPC, though unlike the OLPC, Asus has chosen a more conventional interface. The 3epc is based on an unspecified Intel processor and chipset. Given the laptop's low cost, it may well be among the first products based on Tolopai, Intel's forthcoming Pentium M-powered SoC (system-on-chip). Along with a Pentium M core clocked between 600MHz and 1.2GHz, initial Tolopai chips are expected to integrate components traditionally found in PC northbridges and southbridges — a graphics processing unit (GPU), external memory and storage controllers, and peripheral interfaces such as USB and Ethernet.

Portables

Submission + - A closer look at Asus' $199 computer

Known Nutter writes: This year's Computex is proving to be very exciting with Asus' introduction of their $200 PC. Chairman Jonney Shih introduced the flash-powered portable computer and claimed that it can boot in about 15 seconds. The computer will be available in 7 and 10-inch screen versions and will run a customized Linux distro. Asus has not said when the computer will be available.
Biotech

Submission + - Scientists Closer to Turning Skin Cells toTissue

Nrbelex writes: The New York Times is reporting that 'In a surprising advance that sidesteps the ethical debates surrounding stem cell biology, researchers have come much closer to a major goal of regenerative medicine, the conversion of a patient's cells into specialized tissues that might replace those lost to disease. The advance is an easy-to-use technique for reprogramming a skin cell of a mouse back to the embryonic state. Embryonic cells can be induced in the laboratory to develop into many of the body's major tissues.'
Education

Submission + - ASUS $199-$299 Notebook Announced

Plekto writes: "http://www.ehomeupgrade.com/entry/3951/asus_introd uces_new

I ran across this last night, but it evidently is slow to get out into the news.

Go to the ASUS site and select "global" as your area — there's an area on the left bottom side of the screen that you can click to bring up a nice bit of animation(the site's all JAVA, so I can't provide a direct link).

Prices will be $199-$299 — and it's not marketed as a OLPC, but a small basic laptop aimed at the younger crowds/college students/etc — who need more than a PDA but don't want it to be huge, either. It reminds me a lot of the Toshiba Libretto. Just under a pound."
Programming

Submission + - Pushing the Limits of Game AI Technology (aigamedev.com)

alexjc writes: "AIIDE '07 starts tomorrow (Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment), featuring the most cutting edge research in game AI. The proceedings read like a "who's who" in the field, and there's lot to learn from! Here's a collection of highlights from the conference, and references that can be found online.

Topics range from dynamic scripting using reinforcement learning, hierarchical task network planning for team AI, automated storyline generation, and the more traditional A* optimizations."

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