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Comment Re:Apple HAS browser competition! (Score -1, Redundant) 251

Sorry, that's not Chrome. It's Safari with a Chrome skin, just like all the other "browsers" in the app store.

Sorry, but this is false. The logical mistake you are making is known as fallacy of composition and takes the form: Safari uses webkit, and Chrome uses webkit, therefore Chrome is Safari. What you need to understand is that webkit is not Safari, nor vice versa. Safari is based on webkit, and are all versions of Chrome... but they are very distinct browsers.

Comment Re:Huehuehuehue (Score -1, Redundant) 251

Mercury, and essentially every browser on iOS, is just a different UI on top of Safari.

A lot of people repeating this cynicism, which is false. Safari is a webkit-based browser, but Safari != webkit. All third party iOS browsers are based on webkit, with webkit rendering engines, but they are not all merely re-skinned Safari. Is the desktop version of Chrome (another webkit-based browser) merely re-skinned Safari? Is Konquerer (yet another webkit based browser) merely re-skinned Safari? I think not.

Comment Re:It's very possible (Score 2) 526

It was neither Steve Jobs nor Apple that discovered the problem with a vertical touch interface, but Ivan Sutherland that discovered in 1963 that a vertical touchscreen was a terrible idea.

...because the blood runs out of your hand in about 20 seconds and leaves it numb...

Suffice to say, Apple will not be releasing a touchscreen laptop.

Comment Re:Revenge is a dish best served cold (Score 1) 186

Wow... kudos to the foreman... waiting in the tall grass for 20 years for some sweet payback... that billion dollar verdict against Samsung will make Seagate think twice before suing him into bankruptcy ever again. What I wouldn't give to be a fly on the wall at Seagate... they must be shitting their pants, thinking "how did we let this guy fuck us over so hard?" /sarcasm

This makes no sense.

No... it does. The foreman is a twisted, evil person. You see... Seagate isn't without feelings, you know. If they care about people, they'll never do business with any other company again because they now know this foreman might be instrumental in leveraging a billion dollar verdict against anyone who does business with Seagate. This will drive Seagate to despair.

I am concerned. The only harddrives I've ever purchased are Seagate products. I love their multi-year product warranties, and most of my drives are still covered by Seagate's unmatched five year warranties. How can I protect myself against this relentless unforgiving agent of evil that is ruthlessly and systematically taking out anyone with which Seagate does business? Not sure or not if it's related, but someone has poisoned my dog. I'm taking my family on a vacation just to be safe... just until this blows over... I hear Cape Fear is nice this time of year.

Comment Re: 1993? Seagate? Samsung? Srsly? (Score 1) 186

Well, it didn't stop this bullshit flamebait article submission from outright stating in the headline that the foreman preciously "tangled" with Samsung. Slashdot has literally become Idiocracy.

No, it's business as usual. Slashdot has always been filled with intelligent but intellectually dishonest commenters.

Comment Revenge is a dish best served cold (Score 0, Redundant) 186

Wow... kudos to the foreman... waiting in the tall grass for 20 years for some sweet payback... that billion dollar verdict against Samsung will make Seagate think twice before suing him into bankruptcy ever again. What I wouldn't give to be a fly on the wall at Seagate... they must be shitting their pants, thinking "how did we let this guy fuck us over so hard?"
/sarcasm

This makes no sense.

Comment Re:First-to-file isn't a problem (Score 2) 183

By the way, beginning in March, the U.S. will switch from a first-to-invent to a first-to-file system of granting patents. Hey, what could go wrong?"

The entire rest of the world works just fine using first-to-file for patents. The US is an anomaly with first-to-invent.

The only trouble with the America Invents Act of 2011 is it is not an Amendment to the Constitution, which it needs to be in order to change the original text of the Constitution which clearly specifies (re: "Inventors") the "first to invent" system over the "first to file" system. What could go wrong is the first time the first-to-file system is challenged in court it will necessarily be declared unconstitutional.

Comment the simulation can never end (Score 4, Funny) 144

It started with the state the universe was in around 13.7 billion years ago (not long after the Big Bang) and modeled the evolution of dark matter and energy up to the present day.

so... what happened when it reached the simulation of the simulation, and then eventually the simulation of the simulation of the simulation? I've long been told that it's turtles all the way down, but I'd like to see a citation.

Comment Summary is a massively incorrect interpretation (Score 1) 463

It's not so long since Apple silently dropped the restriction about iOS apps for programming

There was never any such restriction. The restriction was concerning creating an environment that runs arbitrary code, such as an emulator environment, which would restrict any interpreted programming languages from running arbitrary user-created code on the device. So there was no such restriction as stated, and thus it was never "silently lifted." The restriction against a user running code in a non-native environment is still in place. What has happened is clever programmers are creating apps that access a backend up in the nets that executes the code, so now you can code on iOS (data entry, text editing), test your code on the backend somewhere else (i.e. code is not actually being executed on the iPad), and thus develop programming using an iPad on one of the many clever apps that use this architecture.

Comment Re:Confusing data and information (Score 2) 64

A USGS trained analytical geologists opinion...

yeah... but buddy, geology isn't a trade, per se... geologists aren't so much "trained" as they are, uh... educated... and generally, it isn't the USGS that is educating them so much as they are, uh... employing them.

You have no idea what you're talking about... geologist are born. A friend of my cousin's was drafted by the USGS, trained at Top Rock, and did 2 tours in the Grand Canyon, and saw a lot of interesting sediment, so I know what I'm talking about!

On March 3, 1879 the United States Geological Survey established an elite school for the top one percent of its geologists. Its purpose was to teach the lost art of earth's physical structure and substance, its history, and the processes that act on it and to insure that the handful of men who graduated were the best geologists in the world. They succeeded. Today, the USGS calls it the Department of Geology (found at various universities). The geologists call it: TOP ROCK.

Iceman: You two really are rockboys.

Maverock: What's your problem, Cavenski?

Iceman: You're everyone's problem. That's because every time you go down in the cave, you're unsafe. I don't like you because you're dangerous.

Maverock: That's right! Ice... man. I am dangerous.

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