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Technology

Submission + - The rise and fall of Kodak (latimes.com)

H_Fisher writes: "Michael Hiltzik of the L.A. Times writes with a frank look at the decisions and changes that have led to Kodak's decline from top U.S. photography company to a company whose product is almost irrelevant. He writes: "[Kodak] executives couldn't foresee a future in which film had no role in image capture at all, nor come to grips with the lower profit margins or faster competitive pace of high-tech industries." He also notes that Kodak's story comes as a cautionary tale to giants like Google and Facebook."
Apple

Submission + - How to avoid infringing on Apple's patents (itworld.com)

bdking writes: In a public legal brief, Apple offers numerous design alternatives that Samsung could have used for its smartphones and tablets to avoid infringing on Apple's patents. Basically, as long as competitors' smartphones and tablets bear no resemblance to smartphones and tablets, everything's cool.
Cloud

Submission + - The Revenge Of The Operating System (itworld.com)

jfruhlinger writes: "Not all tech movements dovetail together; sometimes, important trends work in direct opposition. Thus, on the one hand we have an explosion of cloud and SaaS services making functionality available across platforms to anyone with a browser; on the other, we have a series of walled gardens locking people ever tighter to the vendors of the tech they buy. Call it the revenge of the operating system; and while iOS and OS X are on the forefront, Windows 8 and even Ubuntu could get in on the fun."
Firefox

Submission + - Firefox losing funding from Google (zdnet.com)

SharkLaser writes: Mozilla's future looks uncertain. Last week Chrome overtook Firefox's position as the second most popular browser, the new versioning scheme has aliened most Firefox users and now advertising deal between Mozilla and Google, the one that almost fully funds Mozilla's operations, is coming to an end. One of Firefox's key managers, Mike Shaver, also left the company in September. "In 2010, 84% of Mozilla’s $123 million in revenue came directly from Google. That’s roughly $100 million in funds that will vanish or be drastically cut if the deal is either not renewed or is renegotiated on terms that are less favorable to Mozilla. When the original three-year partnership deal was signed in 2008, Chrome was still on the drawing boards. Today, it is Google’s most prominent software product, and it is rapidly replacing Firefox as the alternative browser on every platform.". Recently Mozilla has been trying to get closer with Microsoft by making a Firefox version that defaults to Bing. If Google is indeed cutting funding from Mozilla or tries to negotiate less favorable terms, it could mean Mozilla's future funding coming from Microsoft and Bing.
PlayStation (Games)

Submission + - Discouraging Playstation Vita Details (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: "Sony's new handheld gaming system, the Playstation Vita, launches in Japan in two weeks, and the latest report from Andriasang has some interesting details, including Sony's decision to go with proprietary memory cards. Sony says this is both for security reasons and to ensure a consistent experience for all users, but that 'doesn't explain why they're charging such enormous sums for these cards,' says blogger Peter Smith. 'The caveat here is that we haven't seen official pricing for the cards, but game retailer Gamestop lists them at $120 (!!) for a 32 GB card, $70 for a 16GB, $45 for 8 GB and $30 for a 4 GB.'"
Security

Submission + - Sony blaming Anonymous for PSN hack (reuters.com)

H_Fisher writes: "In a letter to Congress, Kazuo Hirai, chairman of Sony's board of directors, blames hacker group Anonymous for making possible the theft of gamers' personal information. "What is becoming more and more evident is that Sony has been the victim of a very carefully planned, very professional, highly sophisticated criminal cyber attack designed to steal personal and credit card information for illegal purposes," Hirai wrote. He also indicated that Sony waited two days before notifying the FBI of the theft."

Submission + - Fortune 1000 Cos Still Saying No To Public Cloud (computerworld.com)

Lucas123 writes: While large enterprises may be fine with SaaS and even infrastructure as a service, when it comes to using the cloud for storing any type of data, it's out of the question, according to a survey of 247 Fortune 1000 IT managers by TheInfoPro. Fewer than one in 10 said they had any plans to store even the lowest tier of archive data, such as e-mails. They 'said we're just not giving our data out to somebody else. Performance still comes up in the commentary, as well. The problem is when you need the data back...there isn't a high level of confidence that they can do that through an external system,' said Marco Coulter, TheInfoPro's research director.
Data Storage

Submission + - Seagate Hits Areal Density High With 1TB Platters (thinq.co.uk)

Stoobalou writes: Seagate has mometarily lept ahead in the race for ever-larger storage devices, creating a hard drive capable of storing 1TB per platter, for a total of 3TB in a standard-size 3.5-inch drive.

The new high-capacity 1TB platters, which represent a market-leading areal density of 625GB/inch, will make their first appearance in a GoFlex Desk external drive holding a total of 3TB. This is to be followed later in the year by a 3.5-inch desktop drive in the company's Barracuda range.

Government

Submission + - Five Big Problems With Proposed Privacy Law (itworld.com)

jfruhlinger writes: "As privacy continues to erode online, we should probably be grateful that Congress has decided to move to address it at all. But blogger Dan Tynan sees a number of shortcomings with the proposed legislation — it's too vague, it bypasses state laws, and it's all based around opt-out, for instance — and despairs that this might be the best we'll get."
Social Networks

Submission + - Twitter as Pac-Man (associatesmind.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Analysis of Twitter as a gaming system. Engagement Statistics, feedback loops, and more contribute to users competing for a "high score." Great for corporations and advertising, maybe not so much for users.
Businesses

Submission + - Sony's NGP Delayed By Japan Quake (ibtimes.com)

RedEaredSlider writes: Sony's upcoming portable, code named NGP, may be latest victim of the ongoing crisis afflicting Japan.

Sony America president Jack Tretton told Bloomberg that Sony may stagger the global release of its next portable as the company is hit with disruptions to its production cycle.

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