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Comment Re:Yeah, but $54 for a USB Wifi? (Score 1) 85

Srsly. Since when does a piddly $54 scare away a bona fide nerd. Having tools like this around when you have an epiphany on the crapper is priceless. I mean, come on, any of you could wipe your ass with $54 and still have plenty where that came from...

Ohhh...wait....I just realized something

::cue Willy Wonka meme face::

some of them think playing D&D and working at Burger King makes them nerds...how adorable

Comment Re:Do Canadian credit cards for sub $10? (Score 1) 248

Here's why...

Let's give a generous 5 cent discount, and let's say we drove in on fumes in a mammoth F-350 Super Duty with a 35 gallon gas tank.

Credit
35 * $3.55 = $124.25

Cash
35 * $3.50 = $122.50

Yield: $2.25

Meh...to make matters worse, my local bank branch is about 8 miles away round trip. If I were to drive there first to get cash..(1/20MPG) * 8 miles * 3.50 dollars/gal = $1.40

Adjusted Yield: $2.25 - $1.40 = $0.85

That adds up to about how much change I lose a week when I do carry cash.

That being said, I go out of my way to pay cash at local small businesses, and when I tip. Its just a courteous thing to do. And if you're a hard nosed bastard, those people probably own homes near yours, and if they go under they foreclose on their home, home values go down, and then the urban gentlemen start moving in. Before you know it, babies of a most peculiar character start coming out of your now drug-addled daughters...

You can't really argue the economics of using cash vs charge, since the banks have really done their math here and have made parity for the way most people live their lives. Using cash isn't practical, but it is the "right" thing to do.

Comment Re:And... (Score 3, Informative) 156

What surprised me is that the prosecutor appeared to take the tampering seriously.

Well, read the summary again

which saw four men found guilty and fined €45,000

By my tally, I have: Government:45000, Lawyers:Untold thousands, MPAA:0, Joe Sixpack:0

In summary: Two parties come to court to squabble. The lawyers and the government walk away with all the winnings. Case is then closed.

This was a win for the people comrade! I find your lack of faith [in the courts] disturbing! </sarcasm>

Comment Re:Amen! Parent is soo true! But.. (Score 2) 542

Sports teams!...haha that is totally true, and the news media has really pushed that direction in the last 10 years. The whole "red vs blue" I think is a trite way of getting Joe Sixpack (the average person) to get interested in politics and increase viewership and voter participation, but oversimplifies it to the point of absurdity and really needs to go away.

But one plays nastier? Which one is that? Politics is politics, and the only politicians that are nice are the ones that either don't have to compete, or have no chance of winning. Politicians from swing constituencies tend to be more nasty, cold, and calculating. I live in a suburban Republican monoculture, and the reps have more of an "administrative" vibe..

I agree with the other comments, it would be nice if there were more variety allowed in the system like in, say, Sweden or the UK. I for one am a devout atheist and despise religious fruitbats, but I also despise overly exuberant government spending, and I'm not alone...but there is no option for that here, you have to take one or the other and that's it!

Comment Re:Mo it is 7.5 time larger larger (Score 1) 218

You could probably get a 35mm lens to focus on a larger CCD, and then trim out the "undefined" area outside of that. But most people aren't hackers like that...they'll see the different number, think "not compatible" and move on.

When you see "35 mm", think "8086 segmented real mode" (which was added for backwards compatibility with the 8080, FYI), which you'll still find in modern Core i7's or FXes. Just one of those things that is never going to go away due to so much capital invested in a specific platform with a long legacy.

Yeah, you might be able to get rid of it, but its not "35mm/x86" anymore!

Comment Re:What a cool guy (Score 1) 146

Seriously! I like how humble he is. Please ask him if he's looking for an extra grandkid.

How is that supposed to work? "Excuse me, sir, can I live in your basement?"

::You look up and see an 83 year old man covered in acne puss, screaming like a little girl and running from something that could only be...Pizza the Hutt::

Comment Re:Wrong message (Score 1) 415

The neat part about Windows 3 it usually allowed you to ignore the error. I remember being able to eek by saving a document a few times. It didn't always work, but it at least let your try. Nowadays? Pffft.

We're sorry, Bill has halted your machine to make sure you are screwed. The only way you can continue is to reset the machine, so we can make absolutely certain all your data is lost. If you need support, please make sure to deposit $500 in quarters and Microsoft support engineers will be happy to be at your side, confused along with you. Have a nice day!
Perl

Submission + - Perl Isn't Going Anywhere -- For Better Or Worse (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Deep End's Paul Venezia waxes philosophical about Perl stagnancy in IT. 'A massive number of tools and projects still make the most out of the language. But it's hard to see Perl regaining its former glory without a dramatic turnaround in the near term. As more time goes by, Perl will likely continue to decline in popularity and cement its growing status as a somewhat arcane and archaic language, especially as compared to newer, more lithe options. Perhaps that's OK. Perl has been an instrumental part of the innovation and technological advancements of the last two decades, and it's served as a catalyst for a significant number of other languages that have contributed heavily to the programming world in general.'"
Sony

Submission + - The next-gen console tech hiding in plain sight (redbull.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: Sony and Microsoft's next-gen consoles are coming: too many "next generation" games announced, too many details have leaked to suggest otherwise. But while Microsoft and Sony officially keep schtum on the existence of the Xbox 720 and PS4, both companies have laid out some of the next-gen features you can expect from both already. Microsoft's recent IllumiRoom demo showed CES visitors how an Xbox might use a whole room as a screen to play on, while Sony's purchase of game streaming service Gaikai points to a future where every Sony device might be a PlayStation, not just the PS4. It's an interesting rundown that leaves you wondering just what secrets both gaming giants might still have in store for us.
Open Source

Submission + - Why a Linux user is using Windows 3.1 (networkworld.com) 1

colinneagle writes: About two weeks back, I was using my Android tablet and looking for a good graphics editor. I wanted something with layers and good text drawing tools. That’s when it hit me. We already have that.

Photoshop used to run on Windows 3.1. And Windows 3.1 runs great under both DOSBox and QEMU, both of which are Open Source emulators available for Android and every other platform under the sun.

So I promptly set to work digging up an old copy of Photoshop. The last version released for Windows 3.1 was back in 1996. And finding a working copy proved to be...challenging. Luckily, the good folks at Adobe dug around in their vaults and managed to get me up and running.

And, after a bit of tweaking, I ended up with an astoundingly functional copy of Photoshop that I can now run on absolutely every device I own. And the entire environment (fonts, working files and all) are automatically backed up to the cloud and synced between systems.

But what other applications (and, potentially, games) does this give me access to? How far can I take this?

Comment North American horses are smarter (Score 3, Interesting) 709

I've been around horses in both the US and the UK, and it just seems like the general population of horses in the states are more inquisitive and self-aware than the horses in the UK. The horses I've seen in the UK seem more or less like cows, they just stand there and react bluntly. I've seen a horse in the US 1. do something it knew was "bad" 2. shy away and trot away slowly, looking guilty when the owner approached 3. got even more pitiful when the owner scolded it. Seems more like a smart terrier dog than a cow. I know they sure calculate their surroundings well...if an overweight person tries to approach a US horse they might get visibly nervous or even flee.

That may explain the difference in attitude between areas. It is hard to feel sorry for an animal that is dense (hence our healthy and unapologetic appetite for cow meat), but a smart animal that you easily develop a relationship with would seem inhumane to use as livestock.

You know, perhaps cow populations in India may be much more intelligent than the average Western cows, and that may be why they are reluctant to eat them. It'd be worth investigating, certainly.

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