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Comment Re:Berne convention? (Score 4, Informative) 648

Sight, if you quote the link, do it completely and correctly. Then you see that: (1) you can register anytime your copyright, and (2) your claims are limited if you register after an infringement.

Quote from: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ1.html#cr

Copyright Registration

In general, copyright registration is a legal formality intended to make a public record of the basic facts of a particular copyright. However, registration is not a condition of copyright protection. Even though registration is not a requirement for protection, the copyright law provides several inducements or advantages to encourage copyright owners to make registration. Among these advantages are the following:

        * Registration establishes a public record of the copyright claim.

        * Before an infringement suit may be filed in court, registration is necessary for works of U.S. origin.

        * If made before or within 5 years of publication, registration will establish prima facie evidence in court of the validity of the copyright and of the facts stated in the certificate.

        * If registration is made within 3 months after publication of the work or prior to an infringement of the work, statutory damages and attorney's fees will be available to the copyright owner in court actions. Otherwise, only an award of actual damages and profits is available to the copyright owner.

        * Registration allows the owner of the copyright to record the registration with the U. S. Customs Service for protection against the importation of infringing copies. For additional information, go to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection website at www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/import. Click on âoeIntellectual Property Rights.â

Registration may be made at any time within the life of the copyright. Unlike the law before 1978, when a work has been registered in unpublished form, it is not necessary to make another registration when the work becomes published, although the copyright owner may register the published edition, if desired.

Comment Re:Apple would do a lot better if... (Score 1) 331

[All valid point deleted ... ;-)]

2) Their volume discount is a total rip-off. Again, I am at a major university and our discount is basically the same as the Apple Education Store discount. It is really hard for me to justify my purchases and commitment to Apple.

No, that is actually not a rip-off. The real rip-off is the large volume discount by other manufacturers. Those volume discounts rip-off the average customer and small businesses. Volume discounts are only OK, if you need to invest much less money to make the deal. I would say that this is not true for Macs (maybe it is true for the Xserv).

Comment Re:Absolutely not! (Score 1) 331

The innovation with the iPod wasn't the iPod, but iTunes. 99-cents a song [...]

I disagree.

I have an iPod, many of my friends have iPods and nobody, ever, bought a piece of music in the iTunes shop. And probably won't. My shelves are full with CDs and those are feeding my iPod: As any other MP3 player it's a substitution of the walkman. However, compared with any other MP3 player the UI makes a difference; such a difference that the iPod really stands out. The same is true for the new iPod touch and the iPhone. To a lesser intent for the MacBooks, which are overprized when looking at the differences to other notebooks.

Biotech

Submission + - SPAM: CSIRO claims revolutionary waste into fuel process

WirePosted writes: "Australia's Commonwealth and Industrial research Organization (CSIRO) and Monash University in Melbourne have developed a chemical process that turns common green waste into a stable bio-crude oil. The reasearchers claim the energy is renewable, greenhouse gas neutral and eliminates the food versus fuel debate."
Link to Original Source
Displays

Submission + - Dell 22" Crystal Display LCD Launched (hothardware.com) 2

MojoKid writes: "Last year at CES in Las Vegas, Dell previewed a "concept" monitor that definitely pegged geek-o-meters in the industry with its ultra-sleek, clear, tempered glass design and super-thin, clean profile. Back then not much was known about this 22" panel that popped out of nowhere, nor did we get a sense for when or even if the product would actually see the light of day on the open market. Now, just a few days before CES 2008, Dell announces the 22" Crystal Display series, with its 4mm premium grade ultra-clear tempered glass bezel and zinc alloy tripod stand. The new LCD will have a 2ms pixel response time, 98% color gamut performance and a 2000:1 contrast ratio."
Enlightenment

Submission + - 2007 in Review: 3 modest but pleasant surprises (ft.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Financial Times' New Economy 2007 Year in Review by James Boyle is actually a listing of 3 modest tech policy surprises in "an otherwise grim year" http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/fdae0ad4-b8a6-11dc-893b-0000779fd2ac.html My favorite was Number 3. US Presidential Hopefuls Discover Technology:
"One would not think this would be a great year for science and technology. The Republican candidates are under pressure from their base to claim that they believe in neither evolution nor human-caused climate change. (Perhaps burning copies of The Origin of the Species will provide the alternative energy source we need?) Where is the advantage for the Democratic contenders in having a science and technology policy more extensive than "we believe in it"? Yet many candidates from both parties actually have positions on complex issues such as "net neutrality"...."

Internet Explorer

Submission + - Mozilla: when more bugs can mean tighter security

biscuitfever11 writes: The outspoken head of Mozilla Europe Tristan Nitot has coughed up a few gems in this interview with ZDNet, not least in the security wars against Internet Explorer. Nitot readily acknowledges the massive number of bugs that affect the open source browser, but says that it's the Mozilla community which makes the browser far safer than IE will ever be. Nitot said: "I'm surprised that bug counting, which is a terrible metric, was used by Microsoft. It isn't easy to assess security, but bug counting definitely isn't the way to do it. I'd rather talk about time to fix the duration of the window where users are at risk, which in our opinion is a much better metric. People within the Mozilla community have a better-than-average understanding of this — we work together and have to trust each other." http://news.zdnet.co.uk/security/0,1000000189,39291344-1,00.htm
Software

Submission + - Sage Mathematical Software Proves Transparent

Reservoir Hill writes: "Open-source software is increasingly used in everyday applications but until recently, nobody had done the same for tools used by mathematicians. Now the skeptics are looking at Sage again after the package won first place in the Scientific Software category in Trophées du Libre contest to reward innovative free software. "I've had a surprisingly large number of people tell me that something like Sage couldn't be done — that it just wasn't possible," said William Stein, lead developer of the tool. "I'm hearing that less now." Cost is one advantage — the big commercial programs — Matlab, Maple, Mathematica and Magma, charge license fees and Mathematica, for example, costs $2,495 for a regular license. But the biggest advantage Sage provides over commercial packages is its transparency to mathematicians (pdf). Commercial programs don't always reveal how the calculations are performed so other mathematicians can't scrutinize the code to see how a computer-based calculation arrived at a result. "Not being able to check the code of a computer-based calculation is like not publishing proofs for a mathematical theorem," says Stein. "It's ludicrous.""
The Internet

Submission + - WDl network drives crippled -- no serving any mult (boingboing.net)

mikesd81 writes: "Wired blogs reports that Western Digital's 1TB MyBook external hard drives won't share media files over network connections. From Western Digital's product page: "Due to unverifiable media license authentication, the most common audio and video file types cannot be shared with different users using WD Anywhere Access."

It doesn't matter what the files are: If you try to share these formats over a network, Western Digital assumes not just that you're a criminal, but that it is its job to police users. You see, MP3, DivX, AVI, WMV and Quicktime files are copy-protected formats. Here is a list of banned formats. There is instructions on how using SAMBA instead of using the included software to work around this problem."

Handhelds

Submission + - Does business care about the iPhone? Yes! (computerworld.com)

Anonymous Coward writes: "Hot on the heels of the startling revelation that iPhone users are browsing more webpages than Windows Mobile, Symbian, Blackberry and Palm users combined, some major enterprise players are lining up behind the hit Apple device. These aren't no-name makers either. SAP, the worlds largest Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software company announced on Tuesday that not only would they be releasing their industry leading software on the iPhone, but they would be releasing it on the iPhone AHEAD of Blackberry and Windows Mobile Devices. Why? "The iPhone has become such a popular thing," said Bob Stutz, a SAP senior vice president who is responsible for developing customer relationship management software. "Everybody wants the ease of use of the iPhone.""
Censorship

Submission + - Graph shows fraud in Russain elections (livejournal.com)

gaika writes: "The graph in the best traditions of Edward Tufte shows how the voting was rigged in Russian parlament elections. Initially some regions were showing higher than 100% attendance, but later on everything was corrected, or way too much corrected, as the correlation between winning party's vote and attendance now stands at 90%. I guess the people who have rigged the vote have never heard about Correlation Cofficient."

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