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Music

Submission + - RIAA Insanity-Suing People For Ripping CD's They P (fastsilicon.com) 2

mrneutron2003 writes: "With this past weeks announcement by Warner to release its entire catalog to Amazon in MP3 format with no Digital Rights Management, you would think that the organization that represents them, The Recording Industry Association of America , would begin changing its tune. However in an inane display of hubris and futility, the RIAA presses on in it's tirade against the very consumers its partners rely on buy (we're not making this up) suing individuals who merely rip CD's they've purchased legally.

The Washington Post reports on the case being fought by a Scottsdale Arizona man, Jeffrey Howell, who is being taken to task for ripping his own store bought CD's to his PC as a violation of copyright.

Now, in an unusual case in which an Arizona recipient of an RIAA letter has fought back in court rather than write a check to avoid hefty legal fees, the industry is taking its argument against music sharing one step further: In legal documents in its federal case against Jeffrey Howell, a Scottsdale, Ariz., man who kept a collection of about 2,000 music recordings on his personal computer, the industry maintains that it is illegal for someone who has legally purchased a CD to transfer that music into his computer.
If the RIAA is successful here, it is safe to say that the overwhelming majority of American music consumers will soon be classified as criminals under the law for attempting to use media they've legally purchased in a manner they desire.
http://www.fastsilicon.com/off-the-wall/riaa-insanity-suing-people-for-ripping-cds-they-purchased.html"

The Courts

Submission + - RIAA attacks Fair use (washingtonpost.com)

cyberfunk2 writes: It seems the RIAA has finally decided to drink their own koolaid. It seems the aforementioned entity is attacking the what most people believe to be holy ground in a case against Jeffrey Howell. The Washington Post reports In legal documents in its federal case against Jeffrey Howell, a Scottsdale, Ariz., man who kept a collection of about 2,000 music recordings on his personal computer, the industry maintains that it is illegal for someone who has legally purchased a CD to transfer that music into his computer. For his part, RIAA spokesman Jonathan Lamy said in a statement that the industry "will continue to bring lawsuits" against those who "ignore years of warnings,". "It's not our first choice, but it's a necessary part of the equation. There are consequences for breaking the law." Fair use anyone ?
Announcements

Submission + - Help with a diagnosis (runfatboy.net) 1

Jim Jones writes: "I've recently been given a diagnosis from my doctor for which I am unsure of what action to take.

I've went ahead and posted my CT scans and an xray (from 2006) to my blog and am soliciting the opinion of the Internet as to how I should interpret these results and what my next course of action should be.

I think that I am the first person to ever place their medical records and scans for the world to review. Is this the first instance of a communal diagnosis?"

Programming

Submission + - What is preventing FLOSS Nvidia 3D Drivers? 1

Slithe writes: What information is Nvidia not providing that would allow one to write FLOSS drivers for Nvidia cards? I am not an expert on this topic, so this is why I am asking Slashdot. A modern graphics card is basically a piece of hardware that can do matrix and vector operations very quickly, and modern graphics cards are programmable with shaders. I know that Nvidia graphics cards use the GPU assembly language, whose instructions are available and form the basis of writing shaders. I also know that X.Org has an open-source Nvidia driver for basic (i.e. not 2d or 3d accelerated) operation of the graphics card. Could someone take the Mesa OpenGL library and write a shader or set of shaders for every OpenGL function that the card should accelerate? What am I not seeing that would allow this to work?
Microsoft

Submission + - Office 2003SP3: Old file formats, now unavailable! 3

time961 writes: "In Service Pack 3 for Office 2003, Microsoft has disabled support for many older file formats, so if you have old Word, Excel, 1-2-3, Quattro, or Corel Draw documents, watch out! They did this because the old formats are "less secure", which actually makes some sense, but only if you got the files from some untrustworthy source.

Naturally, they did this by default, and then documented a mind-bogglingly complex workaround (KB 938810) rather than providing a user interface for adjusting it, or even a set of awkward "Do you really want to do this?" dialog boxes to click through. And, of course, because these are, after all, old file formats, many users will encounter the problem only months or years after the software change, while groping around in dusty and now-inaccessible archives.

One of the better aspects of Office is its extensive compatibility mechanisms for old file formats. At least the support isn't completely gone—it's just really hard to use. Security is important, but there are better ways to fulfill this goal.

This was also covered by the Windows Secrets newsletter, although I can't find a story URL for it."
Space

Submission + - Largest Diamond in the galaxy discovered 5

morpheus83 writes: Astronomers have discovered the largest diamond in the galaxy, located at a distance of 50 light years from earth in the Constellation Centaurus. The space diamond is virtually an enormous chunk of crystallized carbon, 4,000 kilometers in diameter which makes up ten billion trillion trillion carats or five million trillion trillion pounds. Scientists believe that the diamond is the heart of an extinct star that used to shine like the Sun.
Biotech

Submission + - Larger human brain led to larger penis (pressesc.com) 2

Anonymous Coward writes: "The human penis is comparatively larger than that of the other great apes because of our comparatively larger brains, gynecologist Edwin A. Bowman explains in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior. Through millions of years evolution the infant babies' skulls became larger in order to accommodate bigger brains, explained Dr. Bowman. This in turn led to a female pelvis become larger to allow women to give birth to children with larger brains, and this led to the female vagina also becoming less tight."
Cellphones

Submission + - Korean man killed by co-worker, not cell phone (google.com)

bhpratt writes: I was shocked when the original story spread like wildfire across the internet: Exploding Cell Phone Battery Kills. CNN even picked up the story and discussed the shocking occurrence, ending with a warning about how dangerous our personal electronics can be.

The most shocking part wasn't the report itself, but that nearly everyone seemed to ignore the fact that the man's spine and some ribs were broken, yet the "exploding" cell phone left only burns on his chest — not a gaping hole. Well, it turns out that the man's co-worker has admitted to accidentally killing him by backing into him with a drilling vehicle. What a surprise! It wasn't the cell phone after all!

Music

Submission + - New website devoted to Linux audio issues emerged (linux-audio.net)

An anonymous reader writes: Polish Linux Sound & Music Website is a new site covering Linux audio issues. It contains descriptions of over 100 applications, 150 links to related websites and 400 screenshots of audio software. The new website is aimed at musicians and users of Linux systems dealing with audio-related work. Polish version of the site is also available.

The new website also provides the Linux Multimedia Blog – a blog reporting on new audio, video and graphics open source software releases. It is available also as RSS feed.

The Courts

Submission + - eBay 'scammer' animations imply linux = scammer OS

inflex writes: "While going through some eBay pages today it was noticed that eBay has an anti-scammer / dunk-the-scammer flash animation showing a Witch 'zapping' an evil glasses-wearing scammer on a laptop. The laptop itself is adorned with two stickers, one saying "Phishing since '02" and the other is a small 'tux' logo.

Is there any law against this? The tux logo is strongly associated with Linux. Why isn't there any other OS logo, or more importantly, why was the tux put there in the first place! (I'd be curious to see how long the use of OS X, Windows or Solaris logos would have lasted)."
Software

Submission + - OpenDocument Foundation closes down

Munchkinguy writes: "First, they dropped support for their namesake OpenDocument Format and switching to W3C "Compund Document Format". Then, W3C's Chris Lilley says that CDF is "was not created to be, and isn't suitable for use as, an office format". Now, the Foundation has mysteriously shut down, leaving the following message:

The OpenDocument Foundation, Inc. is closed. We sincerely wish our friends and associates in the OpenDocument Community all the best and much success going forward. Good-bye and good luck.
"
Censorship

Submission + - Demonoid shut down for good? (demonoid.com)

r_jensen11 writes: It appears that the CRIA is at it again. According to their website, Demonoid may be down for good. The only message the crew have left is the following:

The CRIA threatened the company renting the servers to us, and because of this it is not possible to keep the site online. Sorry for the inconvenience and thanks for your understanding.
What do you think, is this the end of Demonoid? Or will they move to another country, yet again? Or maybe someone could revive them again?

The Internet

Submission + - Massive p2p raids in Hungary, 100 servers down (rlslog.net)

xxuaoxx writes: "A sad news came from Hungary, a country which seemed to be a very secure place in terms of peer to peer networks and filesharing. Hungarian police raided and confiscated over 100 servers, including scene top sites, private bittorrent trackers and warez forums. Affected sites include the biggest and most popular hungarian tracker bitHumen (30 000 registered users), release site nCore (which is already up though), trackers Bitlove, Independent, Moobs, Revolution and many other private FTP sites which had a connection with the scene.

full story can be read here[rlslog.net]"

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