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Submission + - Major Data Brokers hacked by ID Theft Service

gewalker writes: Have we reached the point where it is time to admit that the ID thieves are winning and will continue to win as long as their incentives are sufficient to make it lucrative for them? According to Krebs On Security a breach in 25 data brokers has been identified including the heavyweights Dun and Bradstreet and LexusNexus. The truly telling quote is

“We could well be witnessing the death of knowledge-based authentication, and it’s as it should be,” Litan said. “The problem is that right now there are no good alternatives that are as easy to implement. There isn’t a good software-based alternative. Everybody in the industry knows that KBA is nearing its end of usefulness, but it’s not like you can instantly roll out biometric identifiers to the entire US population. We’re just not there yet. It’s years away. If ever.”

Submission + - Linus Torvalds No Longer Ranked in the Top 100 Linux Kernel developers (eweek.com)

darthcamaro writes: The Linux Foundation's Who Writes Linux report is now out and after 22 yrs leading Linux, Linux creator Linus Torvalds this year has fallen out of the list of top 100 developers in terms of code contributions.

Torvalds currently ranks 101st on the latest "Who Writes Linux" report for number of patches generated from the Linux 3.3 to the Linux 3.10 kernel releases. Topping the list is Linux kernel developer H Hartley Sweeten with 2.3 percent of changes. Sweeten is followed by kernel developer Mark Brown, who contributed 1.5 percent of changes.


Submission + - Vietnamese Father and Son Found Living in a Treehouse for 40 Years (telegraph.co.uk)

jones_supa writes: A father and son who fled their village during the Vietnam War 40 years ago have apparently been discovered living in a treehouse deep in the jungle. They wore loincloths made of bark and used a homemade axe to chop down trees for firewood. They fed on corn that they had grown, plus fruits and cassava roots from the jungle. Inside their treehouse home, five metres in the air, the pair kept a stash of arrows for hunting and knives for killing animals. After they were returned back to rest of civilization by travelers, they had almost completely lost the ability to speak a language. The Vietnamese district authorities have confirmed that the father Ho Van Thanh once lived a normal life with his family in the commune’s Tra Kem hamlet. They suggested that he was probably driven by shock when he took his young son and ran into the jungle after the mine explosion wiped out the rest of their family.

Comment Re:Compiled Windows Binaries (Score 2) 176

That platform might not be so special, which is one of the main reasons to provide the binaries. (relative) Homogeneity is one of the strengths of that particular platform. Compiling software isn't a part of most Window's users workflow - if you truly are win-compatible (and know because someone has actually compiled it), providing the binaries will give your project visibility you wouldn't have otherwise. It is a sacrifice that you can make to really contribute your software to a large group of people.

Submission + - Global warming? No, actually we're cooling, claim scientists (telegraph.co.uk) 1

bricko writes: Global warming? No, actually we're cooling, claim scientists
A cold Arctic summer has led to a record increase in the ice cap, leading experts to predict a period of global cooling.

  There has been a 60 per cent increase in the amount of ocean covered with ice compared to this time last year, they equivalent of almost a million square miles.

In a rebound from 2012's record low an unbroken ice sheet more than half the size of Europe already stretches from the Canadian islands to Russia's northern shores, days before the annual re-freeze is even set to begin.

The Northwest Passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific has remained blocked by pack-ice all year, forcing some ships to change their routes.

A leaked report to the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) seen by the Mail on Sunday, has led some scientists to claim that the world is heading for a period of cooling that will not end until the middle of this century.

Submission + - MIT's inflatable antennae could boost small satellite communications (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: Researchers at the Massachusetts's Institute of technology say they have developed an inflatable antenna for small satellites known as cubesats that can fold into a compact space and inflate when in orbit. The inflatable antenna lets a CubeSat transmit data back to Earth at a distance that can be covered by a satellite outfitted with an inflatable antenna is seven times farther than that of existing CubeSat communications

Submission + - Top Factor In Successful IT Projects: Speed (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: There's a new trend in CIO circles: The need for speed. Whether they achieve that speed by adopting Agile development, cloud computing, or predictive analytics, the fact is that, increasingly, the only way for IT to deliver business advantage is to be faster than the competition. Or maybe it's just that IT is finally realizing that in business it's better to be fast than to be perfect. As my piano teacher used to say, 'if you can't play it right, play it loud.'

Submission + - New Ship Will Remain Stable by Creating its Own Inner Waves (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: When offshore oil drilling rigs are being installed, serviced or dismantled, the workers typically stay in cabins located on adjacent floating platforms. These semi-submersible platforms are towed into place (or travel under their own power) and then their hulls are partially filled with water, allowing them to remain somewhat stable in the pitching seas. Now, a ship is being built to serve the same purpose, but that will be a much more mobile alternative. It will keep from rolling with the waves by generating its own waves, inside its hull.

Submission + - HIV vaccine makers predict eradication of AIDS after successful trials (communications.uwo.ca)

An anonymous reader writes: The Phase 1 clinical trial of the SAV001-H HIV vaccine has shown great promise. Sumagen Canada Inc and the University of Western Ontario have reported that the trial is now complete, with volunteers showing no adverse effect from their course of SAV001-H and recording boosts in the production of antibodies. The increase of antibodies is seen as especially encouraging as a predicate for the likely success of Phase 2, which will focus on immune response. Sumagen CEO Mr Jung-Gee Cho expects the progress will see the company be the first to hit the market with an HIV vaccine, and predicts they will, in time, eradicate HIV/AIDS altogethe http://now.msn.com/hiv-vaccine-trial-subjects-experience-no-adverse-effects

Submission + - Steadicam-Like Liftware Spoon Cancels Out Parkinson's-Caused Tremors (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: While most of us take the lifting of a spoon to our mouth for granted, it can be a major challenge for people with Parkinson's Disease or other neurodegenerative conditions. It was with those people in mind that the engineers at San Francisco’s Lift Labs created the tremor-canceling Liftware Spoon.

Submission + - Japanese Ice Wall to Stop Radio Active Leaks. (denverpost.com)

minstrelmike writes: Japan is planning to install a 2 mile around the Fukushima nuclear plant. The technology has not been used to that extent nor for more than a couple years. "Plus the frozen wall won't be ready for another two years, which means contaminated water would continue to leak out." But at least they have a $470 million dollar plan ready to present to the Olympic committee choosing Madrid, Istanbul or Tokyo.

Submission + - Amazon bundles ebooks with print copies for the first time (pcpro.co.uk)

nk497 writes: Amazon is bundling ebooks with print copies for the first time, via its Kindle MatchBook programme, admitting that "bundling print and digital has been one of the most requested features from customers".

The digital copies won't all be free — as with AutoRip, which offers free MP3s for selected CDs and records — but Amazon promises to charge no more than $3 per digital copy. The programme will apply to books bought as far back as Amazon's 1995 launch. So far, only 10,000 books are listed as being part of Kindle MatchBook, but Amazon hopes to add more, telling publishers it "adds a new revenue stream".

Submission + - Scottish Academic: Mining the Moon for Helium 3 is Evil (yahoo.com)

MarkWhittington writes: Tony Milligan is a teaching fellow of philosophy at the University of Aberdeen and is apparently concerned about helium 3 mining on the moon. In a recent paper he suggested that it should not be allowed for a number of reasons which include environmental objections, his belief that the moon is a cultural artifact, and that too much access to energy would be bad for the human race. The objections, on close examination, seem absurd.

Submission + - XPrize Pulls Plug on $10 Million Genomics Competition (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: The XPrize Foundation has scrapped its high-profile $10 million genomics challenge set for next month after attracting only two competitors to the sequencing contest.

The Archon Genomics XPRIZE began with much fanfare 7 years ago with the aim of boosting medical genomics by offering a $10 million award to the first team to sequence 100 human genomes in 10 days for no more than $10,000 each. After complaints about the tight deadline and unclear judging criteria, the foundation revised the rules in October 2011: The objective was to sequence the genomes of 100 centenarians with high accuracy and 98% completeness within 30 days for $1000 or less. Interest was tepid, however, and only two of the eight contenders in the original contest registered by the 31 May deadline—the company Ion Torrent, and George Church’s lab at Harvard University.

Submission + - Old electronics don't die, they pile up (networkworld.com)

coondoggie writes: The electronic waste industry is booming and not necessarily in a good way. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) says that the US federal government discards some 10,000 computers per week and Pike Research says the number of electronic devices at end-of-life will double from 2010 to 2025. It is estimated that as much as 60 million tons of e-waste could end up as landfill. There are many efforts to stem the tide of course — the European Commission recently said that by 2015 75% of e-waste must be recovered and 65% of it recycled (after 2020, 85% must be recycled). Here we take a look at where old electronics really go to die most of the time.

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Prof: So the American government went to IBM to come up with a data encryption standard and they came up with ... Student: EBCDIC!"

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