Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Submission Summary: 0 pending, 1912 declined, 365 accepted (2277 total, 16.03% accepted)

Television

Submission + - 'Connected Televisions/TVs' Still Not Very Connected (npdgroupblog.com) 1

antdude writes: "The National Purchase Diary (NPD) Group Blog reports that "Internet Connected TVs Are Used To Watch TV, And That’s About All — The Internet connected high definition television (HDTV) screen has so far failed to break beyond the bounds of its TV-centric heritage, with little use for the big screen beyond the obligatory video services. But the connection is being used to provide access to a far wider variety of alternative sources for video content. The latest NPD Connected Intelligence Application & Convergence report highlights that nearly six out of ten consumers who own a connected HDTV are accessing Over-the-Top (OTT) video services through the device. Seen on DSL/Broadband Reports."
IBM

Submission + - What is the real version number of Windows 8? (ocmodshop.com)

antdude writes: "This seven/7 pages OCModShop article look into the past and the current Windows versions — "Today Microsoft launched its latest version of its iconic Operating System (OS): Windows 8. There have been many version of Windows over the years, and one can't help but wonder what justifies this version number. Microsoft and other technology companies have over-written and re-named their product history before, so we take a good hard look at all the previous operating systems to see if the numbers add up.

Microsoft Windows started as version 1.0 as an add-on to its disk operating system (DOS). The product was a simple graphical user interface (GUI) program that was little more than a visual file manager. Windows 2.0 was released to take advantage of the features offered by Intel’s 286 processor. Windows 3 is the version that really started Microsoft on its current path of success.

All of these versions numbers are very logical and can be easily counted. Where things start to get a little ambiguous is when Windows NT is thrown into the mix..."

Seen on Blue's News."

Communications

Submission + - Idioms Lost to Tech (pcworld.com)

antdude writes: "This two pages PC World article reports on "Idioms Lost to Tech — Technology changes everything, from how we shop to how we stay in touch with friends. And it definitely changes the way we talk--just a few years ago phrases like 'Facebook friends,' 'trending on Twitter,' and 'I can has more cheezburger?' didn't even exist.

But with each new tech-savvy phrase that's introduced, another technology-based idiom is retired--or should be. Taken literally, most idioms don't make a lot of sense (think 'Don't have a cow, man'), but we all know what they mean. Thanks to the changes in technology, though, many of today's idioms are about to go extinct--after all, who under 30 knows what a record player is? Or a landline? ..."

Seen on Blue's News."

Businesses

Submission + - Why Product Recalls Make You Less Safe (popularmechanics.com)

antdude writes: "This two pages Popular Mechanics reported "genuinely dangerous products should be pulled from the shelves. But government recalls sometimes punish manufacturers for vague problems and blatant consumer misuse, actually reducing public safety. Even the word 'recall' turns out to be defective..."

Seen on Boing Boing."

Digital

Submission + - Time Warner Cable patents method for disabling fast-forward function on DVRs (fiercecable.com) 1

antdude writes: "FierceCable reports "Time Warner Cable (NYSE: TWC) has won a U.S. patent for a method for disabling fast-forward and other trick mode functions on digital video recorders.

The patent, which lists Time Warner Cable principal architect Charles Hasek as the inventor, details how the nation's second largest cable MSO may be able prevent viewers from skipping TV commercials contained in programs stored on physical DVRs it deploys in subscriber homes, network-based DVRs and even recording devices subscribers purchase at retail outlets...""

Science

Submission + - Leonardo da Vinci: How accurate were his anatomy drawings? (bbc.co.uk)

antdude writes: "BBC News, with a 2.5 minutes embedded video, answers how accurate were Leonardo da Vinci's anatomy drawings — "During his lifetime, Leonardo made thousands of pages of notes and drawings on the human body.

He wanted to understand how the body was composed and how it worked. But at his death in 1519, his great treatise on the body was incomplete and his scientific papers were unpublished.

Based on what survives, clinical anatomists believe that Leonardo's anatomical work was hundreds of years ahead of its time, and in some respects it can still help us understand the body today.

So how do these drawings, sketched more than 500 years ago, compare to what digital imaging technology can tell us today? ..."

Seen on Neatorama."

Slashdot Top Deals

"Any excuse will serve a tyrant." -- Aesop

Working...