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The Internet

Could We Beam Broadband Internet Into Iran? 541

abenamer writes "Some reporter at a recent White House press briefing just asked the White House press secretary, Robert Gibbs, this question: Was 'the White House....considering beaming broad capability into Iran via satellite so the opposition forces would be able to communicate with themselves and the outside world?' 'Gibbs said he didn't know such a thing was possible. (Is it?) But he said he would check on the technological feasibility and get back with an answer.' I'm not sure what the reporter meant by beaming broadband into Iran: Do they even have 3G? Would we bomb the Iranians with SIM cards that would allow them to get text messages from the VOA? Or somehow put up massive Wi-Fi transmitters from Iraq and beam it into Iran? How would you beam broadband into Iran?"
It's funny.  Laugh.

The Commodore 64 vs. the iPhone 3G S 238

Harry writes "The unfortunate news about Apple rejecting a Commodore 64 emulator from the iPhone App Store inspired me to compare the C64 to the new iPhone 3G S, in more detail than any rational person is likely to compare them, ever again. If nothing else, it's a snapshot of just how far technology has come since the C64's release in August of 1982."
United States

Submission + - Budget Cuts and the Judicial System (sfgate.com)

desinc writes: "In Contra Costa County, California, some illegal activities are about to officially be swept under the rug. 'Misdemeanor crimes such as assaults, thefts and burglaries will no longer be prosecuted in Contra Costa County because of budget cuts, the county's top prosecutor said Tuesday.' What are the implications of local offices subjectively enforcing the law because they literally cannot afford not to?"

Comment Re:Best attribute (Score 1) 662

Do you not remember the Slashdot CSS Redesign Contest?

http://meta.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=06/04/26/1512247

One of the requirements was that users submit an actual working copy of the site. They wanted it to work on most browsers, I don't remember it saying anything about being code-compliant or whatever other BS.

I assume they wanted this so they did could just take the code and implement it without any additional work. Most geeks are lazy, no?

Comment One of My Experiences with the Police (Score 5, Interesting) 653

I was waiting patiently outside of a coffee shop with my puppy while my girlfriend was inside getting a couple White Mochas.

As I sat on the bench, two cops came and sat down right next to me. They were in the middle of a conversation, which I couldn't help but overhear.

Cop 1: "Why'd we arrest that guy again?"

Cop 2: "Man I don't even know!"

Cop 1: "Eh, whatever. He had it coming to him. They'll sort it out at the station."

The Courts

Submission + - Cybersquatter Nailed with $100K Max Penalty (circleid.com) 3

cyberlaw writes: According to a report by Evan D. Brown, Citibank filed a suit and won the case against a defendant who had registered the domain name citybank.org (duh!) pointing to a site promoting financial services. What is interesting here is that Citybank went all out and filed for maximum possible penalty of $100,000 plus the legal fees. From the report: '...the court found in favor of Citibank on the ACPA claim. The court was stern in its remedy. It found that Shui's registration of the confusingly similar domain name was "sufficiently willful, deliberate, and performed in bad faith to merit the maximum statutory award of $100,000 and an award of attorney's fees."'

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