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Security

G-Archiver Harvesting Google Mail Passwords 462

Thwomp writes "It appears that a popular Gmail backup utility, G-Archiver, has been harvesting users' Gmail passwords. This was discovered when a developer named Dustin Brooks took a look at the code using a decompiler. He discovered a Gmail account name and password embedded in the source code. Brooks logged in and found over 1,700 emails all with user account information — with his own at the top. According to a story in Informationweek, he deleted the emails, changed the account password, and notified Google. The creator of G-Archiver has pulled the software, stating that it was debug code and was unintentionally left in the product."
Portables (Apple)

Submission + - What Would you Ask Steve Jobs?

Pickens writes: "Chris Howard has an interesting post at Apple Matters where he posits the hypothetical: what would you say to Steve Jobs if you had five minutes with him? Howard says he would first thank Jobs for holding on to the vision that good design is important in computer hardware and software but then he's ask for more USB ports on the back of Macs, an ergonomic keyboard, and a more affordable iPhone plan. "You might want to talk about the '70s, life in the wilderness, Pixar, his top five management secrets or whatever, but, despite my best intentions, I guess I'd probably just babble on like an average user," adds Howard. What would you ask Steve Jobs if you had five, or maybe ten minutes with him?"
Businesses

How Do You Find Programming Superstars? 763

Joe Ganley writes "You are a programming superstar, and you are looking for work. I recognize this happens relatively rarely, which is part of my problem. But stipulating that it happens, how do I, as a company looking to hire such people, connect with them? Put another way, how do you the programming superstar go about looking for a company that seems like one you'd like to work for? The company I work for is a great place to work; we only hire really great people, we work on hard, interesting problems, and we treat our employees well. We aren't worried about retention or even about how to entice people to work here once we've found them. The problem is simply finding them. The signal-to-noise ratio of the big places like Monster and Dice is terrible. We've had much better luck with (for example) the Joel on Software job boards, but that still doesn't generate enough volume." What methods have other people used to find the truly elite?
Software

Submission + - Orrin Hatch - Software copyright violater (fudreport.com) 2

fudreporter writes: "Wired.com has an article referring to comments Senator Orrin Hatch(R-Utah) made about downloading copyrighted material from the Internet... Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) suggested Tuesday that people who download copyright materials from the Internet should have their computers automatically destroyed. But Hatch himself is using unlicensed software on his official website, which presumably would qualify his computer to be smoked by the system he proposes. The senator's site makes extensive use of a JavaScript menu system developed by Milonic Solutions, a software company based in the United Kingdom. The copyright-protected code has not been licensed for use on Hatch's website. "It's an unlicensed copy," said Andy Woolley, who runs Milonic. "It's very unfortunate for him because of those comments he made.""
Portables (Apple)

Submission + - Free Software-only SIM Unlock for the iPhone

coasterfan writes: Put away your soldering irons! Charlie Sorrel at the Wired Gadget lab reports that the iPhone Dev team has released a free, open source unlock for the iPhone. Engadget has the story behind it. A complete tutorial for use with a computer running OS X is available at MacApper.
Security

Submission + - Bastille linux hijacked

fathertedgrinch writes: The Bastille-linux project's registration has apparently been hijacked by a cyber-squatter. See http://isc.sans.org/ for information. note that there are two articles there — one describes the discovery, and the second shows the new url for bastille.
Censorship

Submission + - Facebook under fire from breastfeeding advocates (thestar.com)

An anonymous reader writes: After having images censored and even full user accounts canceled, a groundswell of support from Canadian groups who promote breastfeeding are angry at Facebook and say they should not have to defend a natural, healthy activity that is promoted by many medical groups and even the World Health Organization. "Photos containing an exposed breast do violate our terms and are removed," Facebook replied.
Biotech

Submission + - Make a baby. Win a car.

Hugh Pickens writes: "Sergei Morozov, Governor of the Russian province of Ulyanovsk, has decreed September 12 a Day of Conception and is giving couples time off from work to procreate. Couples who give birth nine months later on Russia's national day — June 12 — will receive money, cars, refrigerators and other prizes. The New York Times reports that this is the third year the competition has been going on and so far, the region's birth rate is up 4.5 percent compared to the same period last year. Russia's population has dropped since the 1991 Soviet collapse, fed by declining birth rates, a low life expectancy, a spike in emigration, a frayed health care system and other factors. The country — the world's largest by area — now has just 141.4 million citizens, making it one of the most sparsely settled nations. Experts estimate that Russia's population could fall another 22 percent by 2050 with a devastating impact on the workforce, military recruitment and family formation."
Utilities (Apple)

Submission + - iPhone Unlocking Goes Open Source (fastsilicon.com) 1

mrneutron2003 writes: Sure to make the "Jobs Mob" and AT&T very happy, David Harrison has made available an open source method for unlocking the iPhone from provider, AT&T. He suggests donating to your favorite charity as opposed to sending him any green. Nice guy! He might want to check his warchest for legal defense funds however. Though we do not have an iPhone in need of unlocking (one of our staff has one, but he has AT&T service), it appears this is legitimate from a cursory glance around the webosphere. If you need it, it's right here . Use at your own risk... http://www.fastsilicon.com/off-the-wall/iphone-unlocking-goes-open-source.html
Biotech

Humans Evolved From a Single Origin In Africa 461

Invisible Pink Unicorn writes "Researchers at the University of Cambridge have combined studies of global human genetic variations with skull measurements worldwide to show conclusively the validity of the single origin hypothesis. The alternative hypothesis contended that different populations independently evolved from Homo erectus to Home sapiens in different areas. The lead researcher explains, 'The origin of anatomically modern humans has been the focus of much heated debate. Our genetic research shows the further modern humans have migrated from Africa, the more genetic diversity has been lost within a population. However, some have used skull data to argue that modern humans originated in multiple spots around the world. We have combined our genetic data with new measurements of a large sample of skulls to show definitively that modern humans originated from a single area in Sub-saharan Africa.' The article abstract is available from Nature."

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