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Submission + - USPTO blocks web access to "Political/Activist Groups" (keionline.org)

Ultracrepidarian writes: Per Jamie Love, Director of Knowledge Ecology International:

Today I was visiting the USPTO, for a high level meeting on global negotiations on intellectual property and access to medicine. The meeting was held in the Stockholm Room, on the 2nd floor of the USPTO library, at the main USPTO building at 600 Dulany Street, Alexandria, VA. The USPTO also uses these meeting rooms for its Global Intellectual Property Academy (GIPA). The USPTO offers free Wifi for the visitors. But when I tried to login to http://keionline.org/ I received this message:

        Access Denied (content_filter_denied)

        Your request was denied because this URL contains content that is categorized as: "Political/Activist Groups" which is blocked by USPTO policy. If you believe the categorization is inaccurate, please contact the USPTO Service Desk and request a manual review of the URL.

        For assistance, contact USPTO OCIO IT Service Desk. (io-proxy4)

We checked and found that the USPTO blocks access to a number of groups that have followed SOPA and the TPP intellectual property negotiations, particularly those critical of the USPTO positions on intellectual property issues. Among the NGOs that were blocked were aclu.org, cdt.org, citizen.org, eff.org, healthgap.org, keionline.org and publicknowledge.org. Among the sites NOT BLOCKED were the industry lobby groups BSA, MPPA, RIIA, and PhRMA.

Submission + - Eve Online Players Rename Universe To Commemorate Dead Player (themittani.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Sean Smith, Known as Vile Rat in Eve Online was killed in an attack on the US Consulate In Benghazi. While most news agencies lead with the death of the US Ambassador in the same incident the Eve Online community has rallied around Vile Rat. In the game he was a Director and Diplomat for Goonswarm Alliance, and a former member of the Council For Stellar Management. Hundreds of outposts, Starbases and Spaceships are being renamed in rememberance of Vile Rat. Even enemies of goonswarm's current campaign are honoring the passing of this hugely popular player.
The Courts

Submission + - Dutch court rules hyperlinks illegal

Ubi_NL writes: "In today's ruling of Playboy (via publisher Sanoma) vs Dutch blog Geenstijl, the court ruled that hyperlinking to copyrighted material was itself infringement of copyright. The court ordered the blog to remove all links to the infringing links (court ruling in dutch). How this ruling fits into the supreme court ruling that hyperlinks cannot by themselves infringe copyright is still to be discussed, possibly in an appeal. An interesting detail of the case is that the anonymous source that pointed Geenstijl to the images did this from an IP address within the Sanoma organisation..."
Biotech

Submission + - Homeland Security Faulted for BioWatch Biological Defense System (latimes.com)

Mansing writes: Eleven years after the attacks in the US, the citizens need to evaluate if they are indeed safer for all the "security precautions" put into place. The existing system's repeated false alarms have triggered tense, high-stakes deliberations over whether to order mass evacuations, distribute emergency medicines or shut down major venues. Is this just more money funneled to US companies, or is this really keeping the US safer? Is the same type of "security precautions" being instituted in Spain and the UK? Or is this preying on fear a uniquely US phenomenon?
Science

Submission + - Mammoth fragments raise cloning hopes (telegraph.co.uk) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Well-preserved frozen woolly mammoth fragments have been discovered deep in Siberia that may contain living cells, edging a tad closer to the possibility of cloning a prehistoric animal, the mission's organiser has said.
Security

Submission + - Chip and pin (EMV) 'weakness' exposed by Cambridge researchers (bbc.com)

another random user writes: A vulnerability in the widely used chip and pin payment system has been exposed by Cambridge University researchers.

Cards were found to be open to a form of cloning, despite past assurances from banks that chip and pin could not be compromised.

In a statement given to the BBC, a spokeswoman for the UK's Financial Fraud Action group said: "We've never claimed that chip and pin is 100% secure and the industry has successfully adopted a multi-layered approach to detecting any newly-identified types of fraud."

Technology

Submission + - Exposing the Machinery of the Resistome (utexas.edu) 1

aarondubrow writes: 2011 Nobel Prize Winner, Bruce Beutler, is using the Ranger supercomputer at The University of Texas at Austin for an ambitious new project to discover all of the genes involved in the mammalian immune response – the so-called "resistome." Over several years, Beutler's lab will sequence the protein coding portions of genes in 8,000 mice to detect the impact of mutations on immunity. This means scanning, enriching and sequencing 500 billion base pairs every week. The project represents a "Big Data" problem of the highest order.
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft Warns Of Looming Digital Certificate Deadline (informationweek.com)

way2trivial writes: "That warning comes as Microsoft prepares to release an automatic security update for Windows on Oct. 9, 2012, that will make longer key lengths mandatory for all digital certificates that touch Windows systems."

" Internet Explorer won't be able to access any website secured using an RSA digital certificate with a key length of less than 1,024 bits"

"ActiveX controls might be blocked, users might not be able to install applications, and Outlook 2010 won't be able to encrypt or digitally sign emails, or communicate with an Exchange server for SSL/TLS communications."

Android

Submission + - Google Donates $20,000 to Eclipse Foundation (thepowerbase.com)

An anonymous reader writes: In response to user's concerns about performance issues on the latest Eclipse release, Google’s Open Source Programs Office has agreed to make a $20,000 donation to the Eclipse Foundation so they can setup a dedicated performance testing lab.

Considering Google ships Eclipse with every copy of their Android development kit, improving it means happier Android developers. Will improvements to Eclipse increase Android adoption rate among developers?

Science

Submission + - Remote control cockroaches (phys.org)

DevotedSkeptic writes: "Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a technique that uses an electronic interface to remotely control, or steer, cockroaches.

"Our aim was to determine whether we could create a wireless biological interface with cockroaches, which are robust and able to infiltrate small spaces," says Alper Bozkurt, an assistant professor of electrical engineering at NC State and co-author of a paper on the work. "Ultimately, we think this will allow us to create a mobile web of smart sensors that uses cockroaches to collect and transmit information, such as finding survivors in a building that's been destroyed by an earthquake.

"Building small-scale robots that can perform in such uncertain, dynamic conditions is enormously difficult," Bozkurt says. "We decided to use biobotic cockroaches in place of robots, as designing robots at that scale is very challenging and cockroaches are experts at performing in such a hostile environment."

But you can't just put sensors on a cockroach. Researchers needed to find a cost-effective and electrically safe way to control the roaches, to ensure the roaches operate within defined parameters – such as a disaster site – and to steer the roaches to specific areas of interest.

The new technique developed by Bozkurt's team works by embedding a low-cost, light-weight, commercially-available chip with a wireless receiver and transmitter onto each roach (they used Madagascar hissing cockroaches). Weighing 0.7 grams, the cockroach backpack also contains a microcontroller that monitors the interface between the implanted electrodes and the tissue to avoid potential neural damage. The microcontroller is wired to the roach's antennae and cerci.

Researchers were able to precisely steer the roaches along a curved line. The cerci are sensory organs on the roach's abdomen, which are normally used to detect movement in the air that could indicate a predator is approaching – causing the roach to scurry away. But the researchers use the wires attached to the cerci to spur the roach into motion. The roach thinks something is sneaking up behind it and moves forward. The wires attached to the antennae serve as electronic reins, injecting small charges into the roach's neural tissue. The charges trick the roach into thinking that the antennae are in contact with a physical barrier, which effectively steers them in the opposite direction. In a recent experiment, the researchers were able to use the microcontroller to precisely steer the roaches along a line that curves in different directions.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-09-technique-remotely-cockroaches-video.html#jCp"

Biotech

Submission + - Function of 80% of the human genome charted (nature.com)

ananyo writes: "In what is likely to be a historic moment in science, ENCODE, the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements, has published 30 papers in Nature, Genome Research and Genome Biology today, assigning some sort of function to roughly 80% of the genome, including more than 70,000 ‘promoter’ regions — the sites, just upstream of genes, where proteins bind to control gene expression — and nearly 400,000 ‘enhancer’ regions that regulate expression of distant genes.
The project was designed to pick up where the Human Genome Project left off. Although that massive effort revealed the blueprint of human biology, it quickly became clear that the instruction manual for reading the blueprint was sketchy at best. Researchers could identify in its 3 billion letters many of the regions that code for proteins, but those make up little more than 1% of the genome, contained in around 20,000 genes. ENCODE, which started in 2003, aims to catalog the ‘functional’ DNA sequences between genes, learn when and in which cells they are active and trace their effects on how the genome is packaged, regulated and read.
Nature has set up an ENCODE site with an explorer, that groups the papers by topic, and collects all the papers, which are available free."

Encryption

Submission + - Attack Uses SSL/TLS Info Leak to Hijack HTTPS Sessions (threatpost.com)

Gunkerty Jeb writes: There is a feature supported by the SSL/TLS encryption standard and used by most of the major browsers that leaks enough information about encrypted sessions to enable attackers decrypt users' supposedly protected cookies and hijack their sessions. The researchers who developed the attack that exploits this weakness say that all versions of TLS are affected, including TLS 1.2, and that the cipher suite used in the encrypted session makes no difference in the success of the attack.

The attack was developed by researchers Juliano Rizzo and Thai Duong, the same pair who last year released details of a similar attack on SSL/TLS and wrote a tool called BEAST, which also gave them the ability to decrypt users' cookies and hijack sessions with sensitive sites such as e-commerce or online banking sites. That attack targeted a specific problem with the AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) algorithm as it was implemented in TLS 1.0 and SSL 3.0 and were able to use the BEAST tool to grab encrypted cookies from active user sessions that were supposedly protected by SSL/TLS.

Once they had the cookie, Rizzo and Duong could return to whatever site the user was visiting and log in using her credentials. The attack caused quite a stir in the security and cryptography communities and browser vendors were forced to issue fixes. One of the workarounds that defeated BEAST (Browser Exploit Against SSL/TLS) was to switch from TLS 1.0 to TLS 1.2 or to switch from AES to the RC4 cipher suite. However, Rizzo said that defense won't work against their new attack, which they've dubbed CRIME.

Comment Re:Nothing about the range (Score 1) 398

That tells me that there is a possibility to use this in hybrid engines. The compressed air could be used to give power for passing cars. The resulting cooling could be used to cool a main gasoline engine. In other cases it could be used in conjunction with electric engines because those have problems when high torque is needed. If compressed air could be when extra torque is needed, maybe this could reduce the need for rare earth magnets.

Bug

Submission + - Serious problems with USB and Ethernet on the Raspberry Pi (raspberrypi.org)

rephlex writes: The USB controller used in the Broadcom BCM2835 (which is the SoC the Raspberry Pi uses) has buggy drivers which have been causing problems for many of its users. In addition to this the Pi can only supply an unusually low amount of current to its USB devices, just 140 mA approximately, and using a powered hub to sidestep this limit exacerbates the issues caused by the USB drivers. Even Ethernet is affected as the Ethernet controller used on the Raspberry Pi is connected to the SoC via USB. This has resulted in packet loss and even total loss of network connectivity in certain situations, see https://github.com/raspberrypi/linux/issues/29. Attempts have been made in the past to fix the buggy USB drivers as there are other devices which use this problematic controller. None of these attempts seem to have achieved very much.

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