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Comment Re:Why is this different than fingerprints? (Score 2) 260

Fingerprints are only good for identification.

DNA carries much more information about a person. As technologies improve in the genetics industry and with human ingenuity for dastardly deeds, it's not hard to conceive of how this information could be abused.

Once you're in the system, there's usually no way out. Be very cautious about things with things that can't be undone.

Comment Re:why coffee? (Score 3, Informative) 174

If I had to guess as to why use coffee beans as fuel, I understand that when roasted, they are actually subjected to a process called torrefaction. In this way, moisture and other undesirable compounds in the raw biomass are boiled off. What remains has a Btu content just under that of coal, burns more consistently, and is resistant to moisture. Even if the coffee was first used to make the tasty beverage, I'm sure the used grounds would still have plenty of use as a gasification fuel.

The costs of processing the 'fuel' is actually paid for by the first use of coffee: drinking. To get a ready-to-use gasification fuel as a by-product sounds like a great way to extend its uses.

p.s., sorry, I think I duped this reply

Comment Why coffee beans? (Score 1) 2

If I had to guess as to why use coffee beans as fuel, I understand that when roasted, they are actually subjected to a process called torrefaction. In this way, moisture and other undesirable compounds in the raw biomass are boiled off. What remains has a Btu content just under that of coal, burns more consistently, and is resistant to moisture. Even if the coffee was first used to make the tasty beverage, I'm sure the used grounds would still have plenty of use as a gasification fuel.

The costs of processing the 'fuel' is actually paid for by the first use of coffee: drinking. To get a ready-to-use gasification fuel as a by-product sounds like a great way to extend its uses.
Education

Ocean-Crossing Dragonflies Discovered 95

grrlscientist writes "While living and working as a marine biologist in Maldives, Charles Anderson noticed sudden explosions of dragonflies at certain times of year. He explains how he carefully tracked the path of a plain, little dragonfly called the Globe Skimmer, Pantala flavescens, only to discover that it had the longest migratory journey of any insect in the world."
Encryption

Submission + - Two convicted in for refusal to decrypt data

jm007 writes: There's a story in The Register dated 11th August 2009 about the first convictions in Britain for 'refusing to provide authorities with their encryption keys.' This has interesting implications in the USA considering the right against self-incrimination.

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