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Submission + - GlassFish 3.1 Overview (sun.com)

nazrul writes: "GlassFish 3.1 shipped today! It brings together the benefits of GlassFish v3 and GlassFish v2.x with lots of net new features. It is based on world’s first implementation of Java EE 6 with an OSGi based flexible, lightweight, extensible platform. It requires a small memory footprint. It is fully featured with production-ready features such as clustering and high availability, provides optimized runtime performance and ready for enterprise deployments."

Submission + - Judge tires of mass P2P filing (arstechnica.com)

Locke2005 writes: Judge Milton Shadur threw out Copyright Lawyer John Steele's 300 count copyright infringement case filed in Illinois based on the simple observation that the lawyer should have known from the IP addresses that the majority of IP addresses accused of infringing were not in fact in Illinois...
Security

Submission + - Infected Androids Run Up Big Texting Bills

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Computerworld reports that a rogue Android app is hijacking smartphones and running up big texting bills to premium rate numbers before the owner knows it. Chinese hackers grabbed a copy of Steamy Windows, a free program, added a backdoor Trojan horse to the app's code, then placed the reworked app on unsanctioned third-party "app stores" where unsuspecting or careless Android smartphones find it, download it and install it. "This one stands out," says Vikram Thakur, a principle security response manager at Symantec. "It's pretty comprehensive in what it's doing." The app also has a built-in filter that blocks incoming texts from the user's carrier, a trick it uses to keep victims in the dark about the invisible texting. "It monitors inbound SMS texts, and blocks alerts telling you that you've already exceeded your quota," says Thakur adding that smartphone owners won't be aware of the charges they've racked up texting premium services until they receive their next statement. "If you're hell-bent on using [unauthorized app stores], look at the permissions the app requests when it installs. A [rogue] app will request more permissions than the legitimate version.""
Businesses

Submission + - Intel completes McAfee acquisition (idg.com.au) 2

angry tapir writes: "Intel has completed its US$7.68 billion acquisition of security vendor McAfee, the chip maker has announced. The all-cash deal makes Intel a security industry powerhouse, giving it a broad range of consumer and enterprise security products. Intel had been working to get the deal approved by U.S. and European Union regulators since it was announced last August. The European Commission, in particular, had expressed concerns that Intel would give McAfee special treatment when it came to its processors and chipsets, locking other security vendors out of the technology."
PlayStation (Games)

Submission + - PlayStation 3 Banned In Europe Temporarily (tekgoblin.com)

tekgoblin writes: "Looks like Sony is in some trouble at least in Europe. LG had recently sued Sony with a Patent dispute over their blu-ray technology and have been granted a preliminary injunction in the matter. This injunction prevents the PlayStation 3 from currently being imported to Europe. For at least the next 10 days, every PlayStation that is imported will be seized by Government officials."
Databases

Submission + - SPAM: Photosynth as a metaphor for an even bigger challe

missdebbie writes: Remember the software that uses lots of casually taken photos of a scene and somehow combines them into a 3D model that you could then navigate in a breathtakingly intuitive way? Well, what if you could do the same with independently created scientific research databases?
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Data Center Theft KOs Vodfone Network (datacenterknowledge.com)

1sockchuck writes: Hundreds of thousands of UK customers of Vodafone lost service this morning after switch equipment was stolen from one of the provider's(TM) data centers. Data center thefts are unusual, but there have been several doozies in recent years, including incidents in which thieves cut through reinforced walls or disguised themselves as policemen, and even one in which thieves stole Peter Gabriel's servers.
Privacy

Submission + - Facebook Password Requests Suspended

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "The Washington Post reports that Maryland's Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services has suspended a roughly year-old practice of asking prospective employees to voluntarily divulge their user names and passwords to social media Web sites such as Facebook. In a statement, the department said requests for user names and passwords had been voluntary, and had not been taken into account when evaluating job applicants. Nonetheless, "in light of these concerns raised by the ACLU and because this is a newly emerging area in the law, the department has suspended the process of asking for social media information for 45 days to review the procedure and to make sure it is being used consistently and appropriately.""
Beer

Submission + - SPAM: Gluten Free Beer

seangraham76 writes: "The craft of beer making has evolved throughout the ages, but the basic ingredients of the this well regarded elixir have remained constant: water, yeast, and barley. For people that adhere to a gluten free diet like those with Celiac disease, this poses a problem if they enjoy imbibing the grog. Luckily, many brewers throughout the United States and elsewhere have taken up the calling to provide great tasting, gluten free beer for those wishing to (or needing to) avoid gluten.
To come up with well crafted, gluten free beers has not been an easy road. Originally, beer makers substituted buckwheat or sorghum with lower concentrations of barley to meet the needs of the gluten free population. Because these concoctions neither tasted great nor were completely gluten free, they weren’t a very satisfactory solution.Thankfully neither the gluten free beer drinkers or the beer makers gave up, and today there are several very satisfying gluten free beers available.
The population of people with Celiac disease in the United States is estimated to be over 2 million. How many of them are beer lovers is anybody’s guess, but apparently the population of gluten free beer drinkers is large enough to gain the attention of some of the biggest brewers in the United States.
To make their beer gluten free and also tasty, most of these beer makers rely on rice, maize, corn, and sunflower as a substitute for gluten-rich grains like barley. After much trial and error, many brewers have been able to settle on the right mix of ingredients to satisfy the needs of Celiac disease sufferers who also are beer aficionados.
The growth of the micro brewing industry has also spilled over into the gluten free beer supply. In fact many of the best tasting gluten free beers aren’t coming from the likes of Anheuser Busch or Coors. Instead they are coming from small breweries run by the very people whose health conditions and taste for the frothy ale require a gluten free beer: Celiac disease sufferers. Yes, that’s correct. Their love of beer has motivated many individual or small groups of brewers that require a gluten free diet to craft their own concoctions of frothy ale without inviting old John Barleycorn to the party."

Link to Original Source
Iphone

Apple Releases IOS 4.3 Beta To Developers 101

m2pc writes "Apple has just released iOS 4.3 beta to developers. New features include: Developer access to AirPlay API, Four and Five-finger gestures, and the return of the hardware orientation lock for iPad, a feature that upset many when Apple suddenly removed this feature with no software option to re-enable it. Also interesting to note is the lack of mention of the Mobile Hotspot feature rumored to be included in 4.3 for all iOS devices by the Verizon announcement yesterday."
Microsoft

Submission + - Microsoft Kinect reverse engineered (adafruit.com)

MrClever writes: It was bound to happen eventually but within just hours of the European launch of the Microsoft Kinect, Hector Martin not only wrote a Linux driver for it, but released the source code too. In doing so he scooped the bounty from adafruit industries (link also has video of code in action) who also kicked some coin toward the EFF too. Congratulations Hector!
Graphics

Submission + - World Record London 80 Gigapixel Photo Released (360cities.net)

jeffreyMartin writes: I have spent 3 days shooting, and 6 weeks stitching and editing this 80 gigapixel, fully spherical panoramic photo (made of approximately 8000 photos).

The image reveals the highest-resolution view of any city that has ever been captured. From this vantage point — the top of Centrepoint building in central London, 36 stories up in the air — an astonishing number of landmarks, houses, skyscrapers, shops, offices, and streets are visible. Countless people at street level are observable, as well as thousands of windows, many of which reveal glimpses of life inside.

It is a great showcase of today's technology, in terms of camera sensor resolution, optics, robotics (used to move and trigger the camera), computer speed (I used a 12-core, 192GB RAM fujitsu celsius workstation), panoramic stitching software (what took hours this time, would have taken days to render only last year). The creation of an image of this size and quality was impossible only one year ago. It's the future, and you can zoom in really, really far! I challenge you to not get lost for a few minutes at least

The camera used was an 18-megapixel Canon 550D / T2i SLR. This camera was chosen over the higher megapixel canon 5d mk2 because it has a higher pixel density on the sensor, which is the important factor when making the largest stitched image possible.

We've tried to make the presentation as interesting as possible, espeically for people who might not be familiar with the main landmarks of London — You can open the map or thumbnails and click to go to different landmarks. You can click "take a tour" and sit back to watch yourself fly over the roofs to various random unknown places in the city. In two weeks we will also start a storytelling competition, where users can create a cinematic story, using different zoomed-in portions of the image as a canvas to overlay their text. I'm not sure this has ever been done before so I'm very excited to see how it goes.

There is no Waldo here... But there is an astonishing glimpse of a city that's never been captured quite like this before.

Science

Submission + - Scientists use chaos theory to create new chip (techeye.net)

bossanovalithium writes: Scientists have developed an alternative to logic gates based on the chaos theory which allows the reconfiguration of chips a billion times a second, giving fascinating prospects for processing.

In a paper published by Arizona State University, researchers announced the development of chaotic patterns used to encode and manipulate inputs in order to produce a desired output, demonstrating on silicon the new logic gate systems named ‘chaogates’.

The researchers took patterns from an infinitely random variety offered by a chaotic system, with a subset of these patterns used to map the system inputs. This process provides a method to exploit nonlinear dynamics to design computing devices with a capacity to reconfigure into a range of different logic gates.

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