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The Internet

Submission + - CRIA Brings Down Demonoid

Voline writes: As of 09:15 GMT the popular, private, Bittorrent-tracking site, Demonoid, is offline. Attempting to load the site results in blank white page with only the following text on it:

"The CRIA [Canadian Recording Industry Association] threatened the company renting the servers to us, and because of this it is not possible to keep the site online. Sorry for the inconvenience and thanks for your understanding."
Demonoid had previously moved it's servers to Canada from the Netherlands to avoid legal threats there.
Privacy

Submission + - NSA monitors all web traffic: ex-AT&T tech (rawstory.com)

Sir Tandeth writes: http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/Story?id=3833172&page=1 A former technician at AT&T, who alleges that the telecom giant forwards virtually all of its internet traffic into a "secret room" to facilitate government spying, says the whole operation reminds him of something out of Orwell's 1984. Appearing on MSNBC's Countdown program, whistleblower Mark Klein told Keith Olbermann that a copy of all internet traffic passing over AT&T lines was copied into a locked room at the company's San Francisco office — to which only employees with National Security Agency clearance had access.
Security

Submission + - Hackers Selling IDs Online for $14

narramissic writes: "According to the Internet Security Threat Report (PDF download), released Monday by Symantec, identity thieves are offering a person's credit-card number, date of birth and other sensitive information on the cheap. 'U.S.-based credit cards with a card verification number were available for between $1 to $6, while an identity — including a U.S. bank account, credit card, date of birth and government-issued identification number — was available for between $14 to $18,' the report said."
Security

Submission + - Security risks encircle Wi-Fi at RSA conference

Frosty Piss writes: "When top security gurus gathered in San Francisco last month for the RSA Conference, a Boston company decided to point its radar toward the airwaves and see how much of the show's wireless activity it could see. What they found was that many of these experts had not taken the basic precautions to protect their online activity while using public Wi-Fi. The Boston hackers could eavesdrop on more than half of the wireless traffic of conference attendees. Amit Sinha, chief technology officer of AirDefense found that 56 percent of 623 devices — laptops, cell phones, personal digital assistants and PCs — were susceptible to attacks. Read about it in the Seattle Post Intelligencer."
Privacy

Submission + - Google to remove identifying data from search logs

darkuncle writes: "Via techdirt: a couple of Google lawyers have announced via the Google Blog that Google will begin removing identifying data from search logs after 18-24 months in an effort to make logs "much more anonymous". This is particularly interesting in light of recent stories about search log data being used in trials. One wonders (as noted by TechLiberation) how data can be made "more anonymous" — either it is, or it isn't. In any case, law enforcement (especially the U.S. government) will probably be less than thrilled with this development (witness pending legislation and general calls by law enforcement for mandatory data retention, both in the U.S. and abroad)."
Censorship

EFF Forces DMCA Abuser to Apologize 222

destinyland writes "The EFF just announced victory over a serial abuser of DMCA copyright notices. To set an example, their settlement required Michael Crook to record a video apology to the entire internet for interfering with free speech. He's also required to withdraw every bogus DMCA notice, and refrain from future bogus notices, never contest the original image again, and take a remedial class on copyright law. He'd attempted to use flaws in the DMCA to censor an embarrassing picture of himself that he just didn't want appearing online — but instead the whole thing backfired."
Biotech

Submission + - Drug Firm excludes new drugs from Thailand.

gamer4Life writes: According to U.S. drugs giant Abbott Laboratories said it would stop launching new medicines in Thailand in protest at the army-backed government's move to override international drug patents. From the article:

"Thailand has chosen to break patents on numerous medicines, ignoring the patent system. As such, we've elected not to introduce new medicines there," Abbott spokeswoman Jennifer Smoter told Reuters.
Abbott is believed to be the first pharmaceutical maker to withhold new drugs from Thailand since the government shocked drug makers late last year with its first compulsory license, for Efavirenz, an HIV-AIDS treatment made by Merck & Co.
Programming

How Open Source Projects Survive Poisonous People 241

CoolVibe writes "Two Subversion developers talk at Google about how to keep pests and malcontents out of your open source projects. From the abstract: 'Every open source project runs into people who are selfish, uncooperative, and disrespectful. These people can silently poison the atmosphere of a happy developer community. Come learn how to identify these people and peacefully de-fuse them before they derail your project. Told through a series of (often amusing) real-life anecdotes and experiences.'"
The Courts

Submission + - The Brain on the Stand

odyaws writes: The New York Times is carrying a long article on the up-and-coming methodology of using techniques from neuroscience, particularly fMRI, in criminal cases. As defendants are winning trials or gaining leniency based on brain abnormalities ("the tumor made me do it"), it brings to light difficult questions of legal culpability for criminals with neurological problems, a natural extension of the insanity defense. Particularly chilling is the speculation on the future use of brain scans to determine likelihood of future criminal activity in potential parolees and others such as terrorism suspects.
The Courts

Submission + - Jury finds Vonage infringed on Verizon patents

LabRat writes: Today, a jury found that Vonage violated 3 key patents held by Verizon. Vonage is ordered to pay $58 million in past damages and a 5.5% royalty on future sales revenue. While much smaller than what Verizon was seeking ($5/customer/month)...it's still quite a substantial financial blow to a company that continues to hemorrhage cash as it seeks to buy it's way to market share through a marketing blitz campaign. It's unclear at this point if this victory will embolden Verizon to pursue blackmail, erm, settlements from other VoIP providers..though it seems highly unlikely that Verizon would pass up the opportunity to generate cash flow from its IP holdings. No word yet if Vonage plans to appeal.
Editorial

Submission + - Factory soot leads to increased pacific storms.

Cryolithic writes: From the Vancouver Sun

http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news/story.html ?id=e28e0f63-8add-4f03-aa2e-f64a8499bad5&k=5988

Soot from the factories of Asia is changing weather across the Pacific Ocean and causing storms like the December howler that clobbered Vancouver's Stanley Park, a new study says.

"The intensified Pacific storm track is climatically significant," and is the first time climate scientists have been able to measure the effect of "aerosols" — minute airborne particles — on climate, the team writes.
It's funny.  Laugh.

Submission + - Favorite Force Poll

Miphnik writes: Favorite Force?
  • Strong
  • Weak
  • Electromagnetic
  • Gravity
  • Light Side
  • Dark Side
  • Brute
Programming

Submission + - F-22 Raptor Gets Zapped by International Date Line

Anonymous Coward writes: "Lockheed's F-22 Raptor is the most advanced fighter in the world with its stealth capabilities, advanced radar, state of the art weapons systems and ultra-efficient turbofans.

But while the simulated war games were a somewhat easy feat for the Raptor, something more mundane was able to cripple six aircraft on a 12 to 15 hours flight from Hawaii to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. The U.S. Air Force's mighty Raptor was felled by the International Date Line (IDL).

When the group of Raptors crossed over the IDL, multiple computer systems crashed on the planes. Everything from fuel subsystems, to navigation and partial communications were completely taken offline. Numerous attempts were made to "reboot" the systems to no avail.

http://www.dailytech.com/Lockheeds+F22+Raptor+Gets +Zapped+by+International+Date+Line/article6225.htm "

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