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Comment Re:Obligatory 5 dollar wrench. (Score 1) 292

Ah good point. Ok, the key file to decrypt is stored on a remote server. If the restored copy of the hard drive cannot connect to that remote server, it cannot decrypt the stored information. The remote machine hosting the key file is accessible only via TOR. Have someone else setup the actual remote site so you only know it by it's TOR address. Again, two passwords but the wrong password wipes it on the remote side. This forces them to connect to TOR to attempt to decrypt and then they remotely wipe the key for you once you give them the tainted password, rendering the private key file unrecoverable.

Comment Re:All supposedly for catching terrorists, right? (Score 1) 367

Wow, I had completely forgotten about that. I honestly think that preventing attacks isn't as "fun" or "sexy" as computer hacking, so they just ignore or mishandle solid intelligence. You know how much we love to build "weapons", in this case it just happens to be in the form of code.

Comment Re:OK Hypothetically (Score 1) 292

Naah they'd just snatch him up, tie him to a chair in a room and explain very carefully how he was going to backdoor his software. If you just kill him someone will just pop up next week doing the same thing. Better to just have a silent backdoor and let everyone go on thinking it's "safe".

Comment Re:Obligatory 5 dollar wrench. (Score 1) 292

1. Require a password and a private key file stored on computer to decrypt files (Two factor authentication)
2. Two sets of logins: One set of credentials is to your normal account, the other has a login/startup script that wipes the private key and DoD wipes the free space
3. When the NSA asks for your password, give them the wipe password

Congratulations, the NSA can beat you with a wrench all they want, it's not possible for you to give them the encryption key anymore.

Comment Re:failure to respond... (Score 1) 454

I wouldn't have a choice if a judge (the UN in this analogy) decided there was reasonable evidence to issue a search warrant. Also, in the US it might also fall under the exigent circumstances clause which would allow the police to enter your home WITHOUT a search warrant (possible immediate harm, possible loss of evidence, etc).

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