Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:Raise the price of books and see a mass exodus (Score 1) 155

I hope you're joking. $15 for any fiction ebook is not a sound business model. I'd buy a good ebook for $5, but not $15.

I can only accept prices like that for certain kinds of non-fiction works where the market is smaller and the production/compilation effort is way higher.

Paying $15 is paying to have it NOW.

If you wait to read it in a couple years, it will be much cheaper. Given the huge amount of written material available since the invention of the printing press, there is no real reason to read any fiction NOW, when reading it later will be just as entertaining.

Waiting a couple years or three e-books start costing closer to the amount of the author's royalties (if he was smart). I'm fine with paying a few bucks to the author. Maybe a few cents to the distribution chain.

Generally 3 to 4 bucks is what I like to pay. But Free is a good price a well.

Comment Re:Scaling is the Key! (Score 5, Interesting) 365

Sequestering CO2 is not simple, and is currently done mostly by pumping it into used oil fields. It's not certain whether these costs were factored in.

Sequestering it is a lot simpler if you can simply draw if off the top of the CLOSED chamber rather than trying to scrub it out of the stack.
You've got half the battle won already.

What to do with it long term is another problem. But its a problem you would have anyway, so having the CO2 handed to you all
contained is better than where we are today.

Besides coal ash, it appears CO2 is the only by-produce that is not recycled back into the feed-stock.

But, hey, Clean Coal stories have to be knocked down immediately. We can't have it prove even partially successful under any
circumstance. /rollseyes.

Comment Re:Scaling is the Key! (Score 3, Informative) 365

Sounds nice, except for the 'combusted in a sealed chamber' bit. How is this going to scale up so they can feed 100 tons/hr through the plant cycle? That is the question.

The key to the technology is the use of tiny metal beads to carry oxygen to the fuel to spur the chemical reaction. For CDCL, the fuel is coal that’s been ground into a powder, and the metal beads are made of iron oxide composites. The coal particles are about 100 micrometers across—about the diameter of a human hair—and the iron beads are larger, about 1.5-2 millimeters across. Chung likened the two different sizes to talcum powder and ice cream sprinkles, though the mix is not nearly so colorful.

The coal and iron oxide are heated to high temperatures, where the materials react with each other. Carbon from the coal binds with the oxygen from the iron oxide and creates carbon dioxide, which rises into a chamber where it is captured.

They ran this for 9 days straight. They only stopped because they were tired. Scaling it up probably is not that much of a problem.
The bigger problem might be obtaining both the fuel and the oxidizers in quantity economically.

Coal powered that finely would be rather dangerous, because it has so much surface area. Exposure to air, any spark could set it
off. Handling it would require special care never to let it flow around or accumulate around the crushers. They might have to
make it in a slurry just for safety, then waste more heat drying it before use.

TFA shows them handling bottles of it, and even then they are wearing masks.

Comment Re:You keep using that word... (Score 4, Informative) 365

A better word might have been "oxidized" but the good professor probably was trying not to confuse the journalism major
who wrote the story with words too big for their tiny world view.

Lots of CO2 is produced, but it is retained in the chamber and captured, and oxygen and coal are fed in continuously.
They operated it for 9 days straight.

Comment Re:Death of Slashdot? (Score 1) 522

There's no debt until after a sale. A business can refuse to make a cash sale in the first place, and that's legal.

But no business would turn down the sale because you wanted to pay in cash. They would have someone drive it to the bank immediately, but they sure as hell aren't going to turn it down. Oddly enough, businesses that sell $90K cars aren't afraid of money.

Comment Re:Death of Slashdot? (Score 1) 522

In some parts of the Deep South, it is still the tradition to pay off a house with CASH money.
You go to the bank, negotiate your loan, and you pick up your cash money in a brief case.
Usually the bank will supply you with an armed security guard, who will accompany you to the seller, you exchange money for deed, and signatures all around, and the Security Guard accompanies the seller to his bank (if he wishes).

Its not unusual to carry around huge sums in this country.

But with a trunk full of weed and a bag full of wads, you are going to have a tough time convincing even your mom that the two have nothing to do with each other.

Comment Re:good luck enforcing this (Score 1) 522

Well, maybe 80 would be too much.

Maybe 40, sounds better?

One credit hour usually means one hour a week for an academic semester, and a semester is usually around 12 to 15 weeks,
so that means 15 hours expended to earn one credit hour. Two days.
So a 40 credit hour course could be completed in 80 days.
Still too much?
How bout 20 credit hours?

The point is, we've already proven what can happen when we elect idiots, maybe we should error firmly on the other side.

Comment Re:good luck enforcing this (Score 1) 522

Maybe one day we should propose the following amendment to the Illinois Constitution:

SECTION 2. LEGISLATIVE COMPOSITION ...
        (c) To be eligible to serve as a member of the General
Assembly, a person must be a United States citizen, at least
21 years old, and for the two years preceding his election or
appointment a resident of the district which he is to
represent....

Addition:
No person may be elected or appointed to the Assembly unless that
person submits proof of attendance at and successfully completing no less
than 80 Credit hours (or equivalent) in a course of study covering
Constitutional Rights of citizens, the protections of freedoms of citizens
under the Constitution of Illinois and the Constitution of the United States.
Such course must be offered at all Illinois Colleges and Universities.

Comment Re:Death of Slashdot? (Score 4, Insightful) 522

Hardly. Unless your servers are located in Illinois the bill is meaningless.

EVEN if the servers are located in Illinois this law would be unconstitutional. Its unconstitutional even under the State Constitution.
It goes nowhere, and if it succeeds in getting passed, it gets bitchslapped by the courts.

Comment Re:2nd story about how cell copmanies suck today. (Score 1) 317

Standard practice is to buy the phones under a multi-year contract, heavily discounted. Still, in most countries, the buyer can unlock the phone when he wants for a fee that (at least in some of those countries) decays as the phone ages.

Your definition of the word "Discounted" seems a little confused.

Slashdot Top Deals

"I may be synthetic, but I'm not stupid" -- the artificial person, from _Aliens_

Working...