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Linux

Submission + - Love Ubuntu, but looking for something faster? Go Lubuntu (networkworld.com)

colinneagle writes: Here’s the basic overview of what Lubuntu is:

Take Ubuntu. Rip out the Unity user interface and drop in LXDE (aka the "Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment"). This frees up resources (both memory and CPU) and generally makes your systems a bit snappier.

Then take out LibreOffice and Firefox. Sub in Abiword, Gnumeric and Chromium. Lightweight, super-face office suite and web browser? Check.

Those sorts of tweaks, and software swaps, are common throughout the system — and almost invariably resulting in a system that is just that much leaner and peppier. They even opt to use Sylpheed for the email client (instead of the common Thunderbird). Seriously. Sylpheed. Who uses Sylpheed? Well, apparently people who want their systems to be crazy fast and stable.

In many ways, Lubuntu reminds me of Ubuntu of old — back when Gnome 2 was the bee’s knee’s. Lubuntu even comes packed with Synaptic Package Manager (the old graphical software installer from versions of Ubuntu more than a few years back) and full access to all of Ubuntu’s software repositories (it is an Ubuntu-derived system, after all, with close ties to the Ubuntu release cycle).

KDE

Submission + - The Road to KDE Frameworks 5 and Plasma 2 (vizzzion.org)

jrepin writes: "KDE’s Next Generation user interfaces will run on top of Qt5, on Linux, they will run atop Wayland or Xorg as display server. The user interfaces move away from widget-based X11 rendering to OpenGL. Monolithic libraries are being split up, interdependencies removed and portability and dependencies cut by stronger modularization.

For users, this means higher quality graphics, more organic user interfaces and availability of applications on a wider range of devices.
Developers will find an extensive archive of high-quality, libraries and solutions on top of Qt. Complex problems and a high-level of integration between apps and the workspace allow easy creation of portable, high-quality applications.

The projects to achieve this goal are KDE Frameworks 5 and Plasma 2. In this article, you’ll learn about the reasons for this migration and the status of the individual steps to be taken."

Ubuntu

Submission + - Ubuntu May Become Rolling Release With 14.04 (thepowerbase.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Rollin’ Rollin’ Rollin’

Watchers of Ubuntu On Air, Ubuntu’s series of public Google Hangouts that detail some of the behind the scenes happenings, were greeted with some extremely interesting information. This information could potentialyl lead to the biggest (only) departure in the Ubuntu release model ever, and align it with Linux die-hard favorites such as Arch.

Canonical Kernel Team Manager Leann Ogasawara had this to say during the Hangout:

        We were talking about this idea of a rolling release, and by 14.04 to talk about going from LTS to LTS, getting rid of these interim releases.

(cont.)

Open Source

Submission + - LTSI Linux Kernel 3.4 Released (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: The Linux Foundation has announced the release of Linux 3.4 under its Long Term Support Initiative (LTSI) that will be maintained for next two years with back-ported features from newer Linux kernels. Based on Linux 3.4.25, the LTSI 3.4 is equipped with features such as Contiguous Memory Allocator (CMA) which is helpful for embedded devices with limited hardware resource availability; AF_BUS – a kernel-based implementation of the D-Bus protocol; CoDel (controlled delay) – a transmission algorithm meant for optimization of TCP/IP network buffer control. The LTSI is backed by the likes of Hitachi, LG Electronics, NEC.
Firefox

Submission + - Firefox OS Smartphones Arriving for Developers (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: "For quite some time Mozilla has been working on Firefox OS, a lightweight mobile OS built in HTML5. Now it’s whipped the curtain back from the first developer preview phones. The developer preview phones are unlocked, requiring the user insert their own SIM card. If those specs seem a little underpowered compared to other smartphones on the market, it’s because Firefox OS is intended for lower-end smartphones; target markets include developing countries such as Brazil and China. (The first developer preview phones will be available in February.) The Firefox OS (once known as “Boot to Gecko”) is based on a handful of open APIs. The actual interface is highly reminiscent of Google Android and Apple iOS, with grids of icons linked to applications."
Linux

Submission + - Fedora 19 To Replace MySQL With MariaDB (phoronix.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Red Hat developers are planning to replace MySQL with MariaDB in Fedora 19. For the next Fedora update, the MariaDB fork would replace MySQL and the official MySQL package would be discontinued after some time. The reasoning for this move is the uncertainty about Oracle's support of MySQL as an open-source project and moves to make the database more closed.

Submission + - The Open Access Guerilla Cookbook (pastebin.com)

An anonymous reader writes: This new "Open Access Guerilla Cookbook" is dedicated to the recently passed Aaron Swarz. It renews the call made by Swarz in the Guerilla Open Access Manifesto and brings it to the next level with a proposed list of basic principles, an outline of proposed roles in the movement, and some basic guidelines in approach.
Cloud

Submission + - Linux mountable Storage Pool for all the Cloud Systems? 2

An anonymous reader writes: Dear Slashdot,
today, many cloud systems are available on the market like dropbox, google, sugar sync, or your local internet provider, you name it. Many of them offer some free gigabytes of storage.
Is there anything out there which can combine the storage into one usable folder (preferrably linux mountable) and encrypt the data stored in the cloud?
The basic idea would be to create one file per cloud used as a block device. Then combine all of them using a software raid (redundancy etc) with cryptFS on top.
Have you heard of anything which can do that or what can be used to build upon?
Android

Submission + - Android Powered Appliances Pave The Way For Smarter Homes

adeelarshad82 writes: Despite the absence of some of the biggest news makers in the tech industry like Microsoft, Google and Apple, CES still offered plenty to get excited about. One thing in particular that should excite both tech lovers and Android fans alike is the use of Android in home appliances. Looking back at the show, it's clear that the tone was set early on when a company demoed an Android powered rice cooker. It only got better when a team robotics professionals hacked together an Android controlled blender. But easily the flashiest Android appliance at CES was definitely Dacor's Android-powered oven, which automatically programs itself according to recipes selected from a tablet.
Linux

Submission + - Norway tax auditors want to open source cash registers to combat fraud (computerworlduk.com)

Qedward writes: The Norwegian Ministry of Finance seems to be taking a bit of stick at the moment. It wants all the existing cash registers in the country thrown out and replaced with new ones.

Not surprisingly, this massive upgrade is not popular. But it is apparently being pushed through in an attempt to prevent cash registers' figures being massaged downwards in use so as to reduce tax.

The Norwegian association of tax auditors said:

'The source code must be opened'

'Without source code it is not possible to determine whether or "hidden" functionality exists or not. Just knowing that the tax authorities have access to the source code of the application, will reduce the effort to implement hidden functionality in the software'

The Internet

Submission + - Wikipedia lunching travel site's Wikivoyage soon (vividtimes.com)

vividtimes writes: "The Wikimedia Foundation is tentatively slated to launch Wikivoyage next week, on January 15, Skift Reports.

Wikipedia’s next big push is a travel wiki, and the official launch of Wikivoyage is coming soon, according to Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales.

The main page acts like a guidebook and features links to articles titled, “Destination of the month,” “Off the beaten path,” and “Featured travel topic.” Each section is clickable. There is also a discover section, which links to its own page. Here you can read about “strange but true trivia about destinations around the world.”"

Programming

Submission + - Creating an Open Source Project (drdobbs.com)

CowboyRobot writes: "At Dr. Dobb's, Eric Bruno writes, "Creating an open source project can generate opportunities for everyone involved; more so than if the software sits dormant on a hard drive somewhere. But where do you start?" He had initially designed his project, JetStreamQ, as a commercial product but chose to go open source for the usual reasons (community, exposure, reduced risk, etc.) and has advice for anyone trying to do the same: "First, you need to consider the license you wish to use. Other considerations include the source code repository, support for comments and discussion threads, memberships with privileges, site restrictions, and the use of other software within your project. Finally, make sure you add the appropriate comment header block to each file you post as part of your open source project. It should reference you via a copyright notice, the license terms, and "freedom from liability" clause.""
Security

Submission + - 12 Interesting Penetration Testing Linux Distros (slashgeek.net)

pavs.ma writes: enetration Testing Linux distros are a group of special purpose Linux distros used for analyzing and evaluating security measures of a target. This kind of distributions are usually live-cd or usb drive based, but the newer ones has the ability to be installed as a standalone Linux distribution on your computer. The main users of pen-test distribution are network and computer security enthusiasts, security students and audit firms who does security audits with the customer’s permission on their network.
Open Source

Submission + - Abolishing patents: Too soon or too late? (opensource.com)

jrepin writes: ""Patents are here to stay." This is the sort of statement that makes Carlo Piana uneasy. He guesses in the 17th century the common wisdom was "slavery is here to stay." In the 18th century giving voting rights to women seemed absurd and foreseeing open borders between France and German was crazy talk in 1945. At a certain point, fortunately, those things changed for the better. Is it time to change the common wisdom on patents as well? Is the time ripe—will it ever be?—to utter the frightening word abolition? Carlo Piana does not have the privilege to know the answer, but he regards the question as a legitimate one. According to some patent experts, however, questioning the very existence of patents seems blasphemous."
Databases

Submission + - An in-depth study of InnoDB on-disk structures from pages to B+Trees (jcole.us)

jeremycole writes: A series of blog posts by Jeremy Cole explain the inner workings of MySQL's InnoDB storage engine from bytes on disk to B+Trees and their storage efficiency. A fully-functional read-only implemention of InnoDB's data structures was release under the innodb_ruby project, and all of the illustrations have also been released as innodb_diagrams on GitHub

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