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The Almighty Buck

Do You Really Need a Smart Phone? 851

Roblimo writes "My phone is as stupid as a phone can be, but you can drop it or get it wet and it will still work. My cellular cost per month is about $4, on average. I've had a cellular phone longer than most people, and I assure you that a smart phone would not improve my life one bit. You, too, might find that you are just as happy with a stupid phone as with a smart one. If nothing else, you'll save money by dumbing down your phone." I stuck with a dumb phone for a long time, but I admit to loving the versatility of my Android phone, for all its imperfections.
Apple

A Decade of Apple Oddities 204

harrymcc writes "It's been exactly ten years since Steve Jobs stood on a stage at Apple and explained to a surprisingly small group of journalists that his company was going to make a music player and call it iPod. Technologizer's Benj Edwards celebrated the iPod's first decade by rounding up a dozen iPod-related oddities, including the iPod-powered tooth cleaner, an iPod mount for a semi-automatic sniper system, and the classic 1958 Dieter Rams Braun FM radio that may have helped inspire it all."

Comment Re:5th Amendment (Score 1) 885

Given that he was never tried, and given that in our system of justice a man is innocent until proven guilty,

That's simply not true. If you point a gun at a cop and the cop shoots you, the shooting incident will be investigated but it's unlikely the cop will be charged.

Comment Re:dodging anti-science? (Score 1) 519

No. It has to do with the FDA making absolutely positively sure that a treatment is safe, or at least that we know all the possible risks associated with each treatment. This takes years to complete for each and every treatment, which means that during those years, any treatment under investigation or medical trials will be unavailable in the US.

In another context, you'd call the approval process a "job killing regulation".

Security

Submission + - Companies Boosting IT Security Staffing & Budg (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: With data breaches and cyber attacks constantly making headlines, it’s clear businesses continue to face challenges when it comes to securing IT assets and protecting company data. The good news – a recent survey shows IT security budgets and workforces may be reacting accordingly.

Symantec’s 2011 State of Security Survey fielded responses from a total of 3,300 businesses around the world to gauge their attitudes about risk and security. Among the findings: the number of organizations reporting attacks in the past 12 months dropped to 71 percent from 75 percent in 2010, and the number reporting an increased frequency of attacks dropped from 29 percent to 21 percent year-over-year.

For many businesses, those drop-offs seem to be corresponding to an increase in staffing and security budgets focused on certain areas. In regards to staffing, 46 percent of respondents said they are increasing staff in the areas of network and Web security. A virtually identical percentage said they were increasing their budgets for those areas as well (42 percent for network security, 41 percent for Web security). Meanwhile, 38 percent are increasing their security systems management budgets.

The main drivers of security will sound familiar. When asked what industry trends are affecting the difficulty of security, the most mentioned issues were mobile computing (47 percent), social media (46 percent) and consumerization of IT (45 percent).

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