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Submission + - Stem Cells used to Regrow Severed Adult Finger, Thigh Tissue, more.

TempeNerd writes: University of Pittsburgh has successfully created a "stem cell powder" that has been shown to regenerate human tissue — in real, living humans.
The first example was an older man that severed the tip of his finger off in an accident with a model airplane. The wound was sprinkled with the powder and over the course of four weeks, the finger re-grew.
In another example, a marine lost 70% of his thigh muscle in a mortar explosion in Afghanistan. The powder was able to restore much of the tissue when other methods had failed.
This miracle powder is made with stem cells from a pig, Pig extracellular matrix.
Oh what wonders the future does hold!

http://singularityhub.com/2011...
http://www.minds.com/blog/view...

Submission + - AT&T Invented A Way To Charge You Twice For The Same Internet (readwrite.com)

redletterdave writes: In the midst of a raging debate over whether carriers should be allowed to charge more for certain types of data, or let favored developers offer users apps that don’t count against their data caps, AT&T has applied for a patent on a credit system that would let it discriminate between 'permissible' and 'non-permissible' traffic on its network. According to the application, AT&T would be allowed to decide what other content is 'non-permissible'—movies and file-sharing files are just examples—and the carrier could also levy additional fees or terminate the user’s access if they tried to access unauthorized content or exceeded their 'credit allotment.'

Submission + - DEA PowerPoint shows how agency hides investigative methods from trial review (muckrock.com)

v3rgEz writes: CJ Ciaramella stumbled upon some recently interesting documents with a recent FOIA request: The DEA's training materials regarding parallel construction, the practice of reverse engineering the evidence chain to keep how the government actually knows something happened away from prosecutors, the defense, and the public.

  “Americans don’t like it," the materials note, when the government relies heavily on classified sources, so agents are encouraged to find ways to get the same information through tactics like "routine" traffic stops that coincidentally find the information agents are after.

Public blowback, along with greater criminal awareness, are cited among the reasons for keeping the actual methodologies beyond the reach of even the prosecutors working with the DEA on the cases.

Submission + - Private pain: Dell layoff bloodbath to hit over 15,000 staffers (channelregister.co.uk)

schwit1 writes: Curious why Michael Dell was so eager to take the company he founded private? So he could do stuff like this without attracting too much attention. According to the Channel Register, the recently LBOed company is "starting the expected huge layoff program this week, claiming numbers will be north of 15,000." Of course, with a private sponsor in charge of the recently public company, the only thing that matters now is maximizing cash flows in an environment of falling PC sales, a commoditisation of the server market and a perceived need to better serve enterprises with their ever-increasing mobile and cloud-focused IT requirements — things that do not bode well for Dell's EBITDA — and the result is perhaps the largest axing round in the company's history. But at least the shareholders cashed out while they could.

Submission + - Ask SlashDot: What if they give you a broken project? 1

X10 writes: Suppose you're assigned to a project that someone else has created. It's an app, you'll work on it alone. You think "how hard can it be", you don't check out the source code before you accept the assignment. But then, it turns out the code is not robust. You create a small new feature, and the app breaks down in unexpected ways. You fix a bug, and new bugs pop up all over the place. The person who worked on the project before you is well respected in the company, and you are "just a contractor", hired a few months ago.

The easy way out is to just quit, as there's plenty of jobs you can take. But that doesn't feel right. But, what else can you do?

Comment Re: Huh? (Score 1) 218

My alarm system is wireless. There is a small box in an upstairs closet with a SIM in it which does the data transfer. Costs $15/month on top of my existing alarm plan (could get it cheaper these days most likely) My point is that even that small wireless surcharge is much cheaper than the cost of a POTS line. And this can't have the wires cut outside.

Submission + - OpenSSH 6.5 Released (openssh.com)

An anonymous reader writes: OpenSSH 6.5 has been released. It features numerous new features, a lot of bugfixes and sandboxing support for FreeBSD.

Submission + - What the World Might Look Like if Microsoft, Apple and Google were Counties

alaskana98 writes: Slovekian artist Martin Vargic has created a breathtaking old world style map depicting the major players that comprise the 'Internet ecosystem' as if they were countries. From the Slate article:

            "The Internet map's nation-states aren’t represented precisely to scale, but it does take their Alexa rank into account, so that one can easily see which kingdoms are the United Stateses and Chinas of the Internet and which are the Tuvalus and Luxembourgs. One real-world dichotomy that’s reflected in the Internet map is the concept of an Old World and a New World, with AOL, Microsoft, HP, and IBM composing a sort of online Europe, while Google, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest form a virtual North America."

Can a new version of 'Risk' be far behind?

Comment Airport wifi (Score 4, Interesting) 159


"free" airport wifi is a vacuum operation. Interesting note: we were heading out on a vacation a couple of weeks ago. I plugged my iPad into the USB charger in the plane and got a nice popup (typing this from the screen shot I took):

Trust This Computer?
Your settings and data will be
accessible from this computer when
connected.

[Trust] [Don't Trust]

So charging on planes is another thing to avoid for me.

Submission + - Snowden Document: CSEC spying on Canadians

Walking The Walk writes: It seems the NSA isn't the only agency doing illegal domestic spying. According to a Snowden document obtained by the CBC, Canada's Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC) has apparently been tracking domestic travellers, starting from when they first use free wifi at an airport, and continuing for days after they left the terminal. From the article:

The document indicates the passenger tracking operation was a trial run of a powerful new software program CSEC was developing with help from its U.S. counterpart, the National Security Agency. In the document, CSEC called the new technologies "game-changing," and said they could be used for tracking "any target that makes occasional forays into other cities/regions."

The CBC notes early in the article that the spy agency:

is supposed to be collecting primarily foreign intelligence by intercepting overseas phone and internet traffic, and is prohibited by law from targeting Canadians or anyone in Canada without a judicial warrant.

Predictably, CSEC's chief is quoted saying that they aren't allowed to spy on Canadians, so therefore they don't. As observed by experts consulted for the story, that claim is equivalent to saying that they collect the data but we're to trust that they don't look at it.

Submission + - NSA spied on Copenhagen climate summit .. (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Developing countries have reacted angrily to revelations that the United States spied on other governments at the Copenhagen climate summit in 2009.

Documents leaked by Edward Snowden show how the US National Security Agency (NSA) monitored communication between key countries before and during the conference to give their negotiators advance information about other positions at the high-profile meeting where world leaders including Barack Obama, Gordon Brown and Angela Merkel failed to agree to a strong deal on climate change.

Submission + - Half of U.S. nuclear missile wing implicated in cheating (reuters.com)

mdsolar writes: Just over half of the 183 nuclear missile launch officers at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana have been implicated in a widening exam cheating scandal, the Air Force said on Thursday, acknowledging it had "systemic" problem within its ranks.

The cheating was discovered during an investigation into illegal drug possession among airmen, when test answers were found in a text message on one missile launch officer's cell phone. The Air Force initially said 34 officers either knew about the cheating or cheated themselves.

But Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James told a Pentagon news conference on Thursday that the total number of implicated officers had grown to 92, all of them at Malmstrom, one of three nuclear missile wings overseeing America's 450 inter-continental missiles, or ICBMs.

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