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Submission + - What to Know if you're Filming the TSA (cnn.com)

Geoffrey.landis writes: CNN posts a brief article "Shooting video at a TSA checkpoint? Here's what you should know, explaining your rights in shooting video of TSA screenings. First, she notes (from an article on the TSA blog last year) that the TSA doesn't forbid photography, as long as you don't film those monitors showing nude passengers:

"We don't prohibit public, passengers or press from photographing, videotaping, or filming at screening locations. You can take pictures at our checkpoints as long as you're not interfering with the screening process or slowing things down. We also ask that you do not film or take pictures of our monitors."

--the article does go on to note that state laws or local ordinances may prohibit filming.

And then she posts advice from Ms. Smith's "Privacy and Security Fanatic," which is that

"if you do videotape TSA checkpoints, then you should have the TSA public affairs (TSA's Office of Strategic Communications) number plugged into your phone: (571) 227-2829. Another important phone number to have with you is the TSA's Office of Civil Rights at (571) 227-1917."

Ms. Smith goes on to tell some stories of people who have been challenged at airport screening stations for shooting video. Important note, it's probably wise not to take off your pants except your underwear while doing this.

So, go ahead, and video, but know your rights and "stay calm and polite at all times." You could be the next You-tube sensation.

Submission + - Large Hadron Collider Detects "Big Bang" Matter (www.cbc.ca)

dvltash writes: A phase of matter created moments after the Big Bang is thought to have been detected at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.

"Striking" evidence of a quark-gluon plasma has been observed by a team of researchers, including Canadians, at the facility near Geneva, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) announced Friday.

The results of the experiment by an international collaboration called ATLAS were accepted Friday morning for publication in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters, less than 24 hours after it was submitted, said Teuscher, a research scientist at the Canadian Institute for Particle Physics and a physics professor at the University of Toronto.

Normally, the peer review process takes weeks or months, added Teuscher, a member of ATLAS who did some of the data analysis for the experiment.

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2010/11/26/lhc-big-bang-quark-gluon-plasma.html#ixzz16QZEV86H

Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2010/11/26/lhc-big-bang-quark-gluon-plasma.html#ixzz16QZ78KbM

Submission + - Quark-Gluon Plasma observed at LHC (www.cbc.ca)

Canadian_Daemon writes: A phase of matter created moments after the Big Bang is thought to have been detected at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland. "Striking" evidence of a quark-gluon plasma has been observed by a team of researchers, including Canadians, at the facility near Geneva, the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) announced Friday.
Programming

Submission + - The Young Coders Who Stole the World

theodp writes: In a retrospective on the 21st century, TIME's Lev Grossman writes that a decade ago, four young men — not one of whom finished college — changed the way the world works. Northeastern University freshman Shawn Fanning, then 19, cranked out Napster. Norwegian teenager Jon Lech Johansen (aka DVD Jon), 15 years old, teamed up with two other programmers to crack commercial DVDs. At age 18, Justin Frankel gave the world WinAmp, and three years later released Gnutella. And Bram Cohen, the grandpa of the group at 26, came up with BitTorrent. These four horsemen of the digital apocalypse arguably laid the foundation for much of the digital-media environment we currently inhabit — iTunes, Netflix, Kindle, DSL are just a few things that come to mind — even if the likes of Steve Jobs, Reed Hastings, Jeff Bezos, and Randall L. Stephenson and are the ones reaping the riches.

Submission + - What software specification tools do you use?

IronWilliamCash writes: I currently work for a small software development company and for many years we have been using internally built tools for all our software specifications, bugs, change requests and the like.Traceability is a big issue as we are CMMI level 2 and thus our internal processes need to be clear and everything must be documented. We are currently looking into getting a unified solution for this, after quite a bit of google, there are quite a few different options (Contour, Kovair, MKS, Doors, CaliberFM, Accept360, etc.). I was wondering what do other slashdotters use in their everyday life. Does it fulfill your needs? And what is the most important part in a specification management tool?
Government

Submission + - UK Gov Issues DA Notices Over WikiLeaks Bombshell (thinq.co.uk)

Stoobalou writes: The UK Government has issued Defence Advisory Notices to editors of UK news outlets in an attempt to hush up the latest bombshell from whistle-blowing web site WikiLeaks.

DA Notices, the last of which was issued in April 2009 after sensitive defence documents were photographed using a telephoto lens in the hand of Assistant Commissioner Bob Quick as he arrived at No 10 Downing Street for a briefing, are requests not to publish, and therefore not legally enforceable.

News

Submission + - BP ignored safety modeling software to save time (computerworlduk.com)

DMandPenfold writes: BP ignored the advice of safety critical software in an attempt to save time before the disastrous Gulf of Mexico oil spill, according to a presentation slide prepared by US investigators.

The slide in question briefly appeared on the Oil Spill Commission’s website in error, but was quickly retracted.

Advanced cement modelling software, provided by BP’s cement contractor Halliburton, had highlighted serious stability concerns with the well...

Space

Submission + - Oxygen-rich atmosphere discovered on Rhea (space.com)

Randyll writes: During its Saturn flyby in March the Cassini space probe detected an oxygen-rich atmosphere on Rhea, Saturn's second-largest moon. While 100 times thinner than the atmospheres of Europa or Ganymede, the atmosphere contains a surprising amount of carbon dioxide. There is an explanation for the oxygen, while the origin of the carbon dioxide is a mystery. A few of the possible explanations are that Rhea has carbon-rich organic molecules or that the gas is seeping from Rhea's interior, however researchers have been unable to determine the exact source for the gas.
Idle

Submission + - Cambridge Computer IDs World's Most Boring Day (telegraph.co.uk)

smitty777 writes: Scientists hard at work at Cambridge used a computer algorithm and nearly 300 million historical facts to identify the most boring day in history. The winner? On April 11, 1954, absolutely nothing happened. That is, unless you count the most boring day in the world happening.

Comment Re:Cool. (Score 1) 169

> Almost every native culture on Earth has legends about a "golden age" when a more advanced civilization existed, which then disappeared during a subsequent "dark age".

This idea appeared and appears every time after the war, specially in conquests with the resulting establishment of an oppressive regime. With time, it becomes part of the "legendary history" and conforms the roots of many independence movements and nationalisms.

Comment Re:To bring the book industry into the 21st centur (Score 1) 223

Yeah, if you want to see how that thing could actually work, look at the Tempts Fate segment of the Goblins comic (currently on hiatus).

Here's how it goes: At the beginning of the month, the author posts an initial setting comic; at the bottom of the comic are several obstacles that Tempts Fate (the main character) will have to pass. Each obstacle is associated with a donation goal.

When the date of the obstacle rolls around, Tempts Fate will only defeat the obstacle if the goal has been met. How easily Tempts Fate defeats the obstacle depends on how much money over the goal the author has received.

If the donation goal hasn't been met, Tempts Fate will die.

The author initially started this several years ago, probably expecting that Tempts Fate would die in a couple of issues. Right now it's paused because the author has other stuff going on, but so far Tempts Fate has been no less than a little Goblin ninja; the donation goals are almost always exceeded, and sometimes by quite a lot.

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It seems that more and more mathematicians are using a new, high level language named "research student".

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