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Comment Re:A classic example... (Score 5, Informative) 419

Yeah, I gotta quit wading around in the Twitter during meetings. Not can I now not find the original hoax-claim, I'm seeing the Kotaku article indicating that it's just so, so, so much better than a hoax -- yeah, really at a loss as to how this could get better. But I am willing to wait and see, yeah.

Privacy

Submission + - License Plate Scanners Logging Our Every Move (washingtonpost.com)

TheNextCorner writes: "With virtually no public debate, police agencies have begun storing information from the surveillance cameras, building databases that document the travels of millions of vehicles.

It has now become clear that this technology, if we do not limit its use, will represent a significant step toward the creation of a surveillance society in the United States."

Privacy

Submission + - AT&T hackers warned of vulnerability, now prov (hou2600.org)

hessian writes: "A few years ago, a smart young hacker saw a blatant hole in AT&T security and so whipped up a quick script to mine the website for information.

However, this guy was a grey hat or white hat hacker, meaning that he did not have criminal intent of the for-profit variety. Instead, he was just curious to see if it could be done. He sent the data to the corporation and, when they ignored him, published the hack.

They came down on him like a ton of bricks. Today, a similar hack may have leaked confidential customer information from AT&T. They were warned by a hacker but because of the source, ignored it, and now their customers are the ones to pay for AT&T's hacker-phobia."

Piracy

Submission + - BSA stops support for Stop Online Piracy Act (techworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: "The U.S. Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), which would allow U.S. authorities to seize the domain names of copyright-infringing websites, has taken another blow as a leading proponent has withdrawn its support. The Business Software Alliance (BSA), which initially supported SOPA, has decided the legislation goes too far."
The Internet

Submission + - Amazing Kickstarter Project Twine: Cheap and Easy (readwriteweb.com)

An anonymous reader writes: It might be a bit late for the holidays, but every nerd is going to want one under the tree. A team of MIT grads, called Supermechanical, are looking to raise $35,000 by January 3, 2012 to put Twine into production. Twine is a 2.5" square that has an accelerometer, temperature sensor, and a number of external sensors that can be easily set up to text, tweet or email when certain conditions re met. Want a text when your dryer finishes? An email when the snail mail is dropped off? Twine may be the answer.

Submission + - CarrierIQ sues TrevE for copyright infringement (xda-developers.com)

realized writes: As earlier reported on Slashdot, CarrierIQ installs software on cellphones to track user activity. The company earlier denied that they had a “root kit” installed but won’t go into details as to what they track. CarrierIQ is now suing the man responsible for shedding light on CarrierIQ for “copyright infringement” for copying the company’s training manuals and posting it on his own website. Luckily, EFF has decided to help out the XDA Developer, TrevE. You can see the letter here (https://www.eff.org/sites/default/files/eckhart_cease_desist_demand_redacted.pdf)
HP

Submission + - Discontinued HP TouchPad top non-iPad of 2011 (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: Hewlett-Packard, which recently discontinued its TouchPad tablets, took the top spot among tablet vendors behind Apple's iPad this year through October, according to research from NPD. HP had 17% of non-Apple tablet retail sales, from January through October, just barely beating Samsung, which had 16% of non-iPad sales, NPD found. HP managed to best the others even after deciding to exit the tablet market. TouchPad tablets got a boost after HP announced it was discontinuing them and slashed the price.
User Journal

Journal Journal: Comments & Moderation Improvements Under Way 21

While reading through your responses to the reader survey from a couple months ago a couple things were clear. You both love & hate comments. You love the insightfulness of our readers, you hate trolls, and there are a number of things currently getting in the way from you being able to navigate through discussions as easily as you might like to.

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Businesses

Submission + - 88 Year Old Scientist Hassled by DEA (mercurynews.com) 1

Calibax writes: 30 years ago Bob Wallace and his partner came up with a product to help hikers, flood victims and others purify water. Wallace, now 88 years old, packs his product by hand in his garage, stores it in his backyard shed and sells it for $6.50.

Recently, the DEA has been hassling him because his product uses crystalline iodine. He has been refused a license to purchase the iodine because it can be used in the production of crystal meth, and as a result he is now out of business.

A DEA spokesman describes this as "collateral damage" not resulting from DEA regulations but from the selfish actions of criminals.

Censorship

Submission + - Senator Wyden Promises to Read Out Names of PROTEC (techdirt.com)

Adrian Lopez writes: "As the US Senate prepares to vote on the so-called PROTECT IP Act, Senator Ron Wyden has reiterated his opposition to the bill and has promised to actually use his allotted time to filibuster on the bill if he has to. Wyden is promising to read the names of people who signed petitions against PROTECT IP. So if you'd like your name to go into the official record of the US Senate as being against PIPA, here's your chance... You can sign at that link."
Privacy

Submission + - The Crypto Project Revives Cypherpunks Ethic (threatpost.com)

Trailrunner7 writes: When a small group of activists announced the debut of The Crypto Project earlier this year, for many, ahem, mature, security and privacy advocates it brought to mind memories of the original cypherpunk movement that began in the 1990s and that group's seminal efforts to encourage the use of strong cryptography and anonymity online, as well as its successes and failures. The two groups are not allied by anything other than ideology, but The Crypto Project's leaders are aiming to follow in the footsteps of the cypherpunks, build on their accomplishments and make security and privacy tools freely available to the masses.

The group is working on a number of projects right now, including setting up an anonymous remailer, putting up a Convergence notary and setting up a Tahoe-LAFS grid. Threatpost has an interview with Sir Valiance, one of the leaders of the project, who talks about the need for better privacy and anonymity online and why the cypherpunks are still important today.

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