Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:Title not entirely accurate (Score 5, Informative) 131

Story broke in 2008 (Randi), NYT (2009), and then in 2010 the BBC did more work on it.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/newsnight/8471187.stm
Here's the original WIkipedia page, from 2009, with the links to NYT and Randi:
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=ADE_651&oldid=323934632

Comment Re:Waitrose (upscale supermarket in UK) Twitter (Score 1) 172

I was surprised to see a mobile phone company's official FB page flooded with complaints, and one service rep trying to tell people to email her so she could fix their problems. I guess FB does not allow holding comments for moderation like you can with typical forum and blog software. In FB you can disable commenting, but that's it as far as I can tell.

Comment Re:Reverse notation (Score 1) 110

Are you sure that was part of thee DNS? Usenet used that kind of hierarchy: humanities.classics, humanities.design.misc, alt.binaries.nice, alt.tv, etc. Also, you see DNS names reversed like uk.co.bbc in algorithms. Makes a much more readable sorted list.

Comment Re:Should be .gb not .uk (Score 1) 110

At one time there were three countries without much geography in their common names:
United Kingdom (of...)
United States (of...)
Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (no geography at all).

Then there's the (Roman) Empire and the (Roman) Catholic Church. Anglicans talk about a "catholic" church, meaning "universal," which is confusing.

Comment Re:Poor sods (Score 1) 110

I find "subzero" confusing in Canadian or British weather. Adds to the wind-chill confusion, but that is less common.
I read somewhere British phone numbers are the most difficult to remember. Maybe it's the punctuation, but I mostly like the U.S. system, except for the newer area code regime.

Comment Re:The airwaves are public not private (Score 1) 186

Yes, but in WPA2-Personal, how can the client distinguish the router from it's evil twin? If the evil twin router issues a challenge, it can probably decode the response. All the client knows to do is send the password encoded to meet the challenge. With WPA2-Enterpise the client keeps track of the router's SSL public key, so can verify the challenge is valid. The evil twin cannot send a valid challenge because it does not have the real router's private key (provided by Radius). That's how I understand it. Or "guess-understand" it! I would like to be wrong.

There a pretty simple Free Radius setup tutorial here: http://kirkkosinski.com/2012/10/securing-wi-fi-with-peap-and-freeradius-on-centos/ So I guess it just requires a hardware server and making sure your router has decent firmware to connect.

Comment Re:The airwaves are public not private (Score 1) 186

That's good to know. I assumed that since the client can't distinguish the real router form the fake, it would respond to a password challenge with the password response, and that the response could be demunged to the cleartext, in WPA2-Personal. Glad to know if that's not true.

Comment Re:The airwaves are public not private (Score 1) 186

Is it correct that the evil twin problem is unsolved for WPA2-Personal? Seems you can't prevent someone else from spoofing your SSID and harvesting the passphrase, unless you go to WPA2-Enterprise with Radius. Free Radius is available, but you need to run a little server in addition to your wireless router, I would guess. Maybe the extra hardware can double as a firewall?

Slashdot Top Deals

The cost of feathers has risen, even down is up!

Working...