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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 5 declined, 3 accepted (8 total, 37.50% accepted)

Security

Submission + - BBC Faces uphill battle over DRM

smallfries writes: Yesterday the new BBC service to push non-DRM content to iPhones was opened up for use by linux and mac users. This morning the BBC announced that despite "hackers exploiting" their system the security hole had been closed. The "hack" involved a simple change of user agent string to access the iPhone content. By closing the hole again the BBC has entered an arms race with non-microsoft users determined to use higher quality content than the flash streams. The BBC seems to believe that it can identify connections from trusted iPhones, and deliver non-DRM content without linux and mac "hackers" using the system. After only a few hours the system was opened up again. How long will the BBC ignore technological reason and pretend that it can deliver non-DRM content to one group of its users, while denying another group the same service?
Media

Submission + - Irresistible Force Meets Immovable Object (theregister.co.uk)

smallfries writes: After a long battle with Linux users in the UK, the BBC was forced into releasing a flash version of the iPlayer streaming service to fulfil their obligations to license-fee payers. After claiming that development of linux and mac versions of the iPlayer would take two years, the beeb has rushed to support the iPhone. Unlike those untrustworthy scum who use non-microsoft operating systems, iPhone users can be trusted because their platform is locked down ... so the beeb opened a non-DRM hole in the iPlayer to support them. This was guarded by the extreme security of User Agent strings! Long story shut, linux and mac users have made their own non-DRM, non-microsoft platform from firebug and wget. UK users can now watch (and keep) their favorite BBC shows, just follow the links in the 'el Reg story.
The Internet

Submission + - Net Neutrality Debate crosses the Atlantic (independent.co.uk)

smallfries writes: The network neutrality debate has raged on in the States for some time now. Now broadband providers in the UK have banded together to threaten the BBC that plans to provide programming over "their" network could disrupt operations. The BBC is being asked to cough up the readies to pay for bandwidth charges, otherwise traffic shaping will be used to limit access to the iPlayer. Strange really, I thought that the monthly fee we pay already was to cover access ... but maybe it only covers the final mile and they need to be paid twice to cover the rest of the journey.

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