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Comment Re:The classic double speak (Score 1) 441

Charge for extra service for the offending 3%.

"Offending"?

If someone buys "UNLIMITED" (all caps to match marketing material) access, shouldn't they be entitled to UNLIMITED (all caps to match marketing material) usage without being considered "offending"? That's like saying my family uses too much milk because we drink the full gallon instead of letting it go bad.

Comment Re:Assuming... (Score 1) 600


No it already happened, we just have not realized it yet, Friday September 13 1999 when the nuclear waste dump on the moon blew up and the Moon was torn from orbit, Remember?

The Gravitational sheer tore the planet apart.

We were all converted to Pure Energy and we formed a network of consciousness so our minds can live on called slashdot.

Comment Re:Amateurs (Score 2, Interesting) 600

We have a doomsday once every 365 days (except on leap years) when our calendar hits December 31.

I'm just being pedantic, I know, but our calendar (the Gregorian calendar) actually has a cycle of 400 years. The most recent cycle transition was in year 2000 (which was a leap year when it otherwise wouldn't have been).

Of course the rest of your comment is spot-on!

Comment Re:New Intel D945GSEJT & PC Engine Alix!!! (Score 1) 697

Thanks.
I've been advised to check out Alix boards as well, when my submission was still hanging in the air. I have looked at them and they seem a bit cheaper then Soekris boxes. Right now I'm in the process of buying an Alix board together with a small case and a 20 Gb disk. I can always upgrade that disk later on, or add an usb disk if I want to. I'm buying the complete system here in Holland for 138 Euro, so that's quite cheap. It comes with vga and 100Mbit nic, which should be good enough. If I upgrade the disk, it will cost me an additional 50 Euro for a 250 Gb disk (2,5").

Comment Re:In Tune... (Score 1) 338

We're native to earth.

There are those who believe that life here began out there, far across the universe, with tribes of humans who may have been the forefathers of the Egyptians, or the Toltecs, or the Mayans. That they may have been the architects of the great pyramids, or the lost civilizations of Lemuria or Atlantis. Some believe that there may yet be brothers of man who even now fight to survive somewhere beyond the heavens...

Comment Re:Bede bede bede (Score 5, Informative) 342

DS9 only got good when they hired 1/2 the creative people off of B5

Which creative people would that be? There were 110 B5 episodes. Of those 92 were written by JMS. All 44 episodes of seasons 3 and 4 were scripted by him.

because fox said (You guessed it) B5 is cancelled.

That would be a peculiar thing for Fox to say, as B5 was produced by Warner Brothers and aired in syndication.

Amazingly they recanted

not quite... what happened is that TNT agreed to pick up the show.

which is why the last season of B5 was crap they had lost 1/2 their talent and squeezed the last 2 years of story arc into season 4 to finish the series.

The only person I recall leaving was Claudia Christian who played Cmdr Ivanova.

Damn you FOX!!

Fox had nothing to do with anything.

Good post. Next time try some facts.

Role Playing (Games)

Submission + - Co-creator of Dungeons & Dragons dies at 61 (slashdot.org)

BeanBagKing writes: From Amy Forliti of the Associated Press:
Dave Arneson, one of the co-creators of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy game and a pioneer of role-playing entertainment, died after a two-year battle with cancer, his family said Thursday. He was 61.

Arneson and Gary Gygax developed Dungeons & Dragons in 1974 using medieval characters and mythical creatures. The game known for its oddly shaped dice became a hit, particularly among teenage boys.

The full article can be found here

Comment Re:other potential things (Score 1) 433

"Warp speed" though, I'm not sure on. I'm pretty sure it predates Roddenberry though... Any takers?

"Warp", as a nautical term, is a method of moving a ship by pulling on a rope. C.S. Forester's Horatio Hornblower frequently does this in the novels (often having the crew in a rowboat carry the anchor some distance then drop it, then the shipboard crew pulls the line to drag the ship to the new location where the process is repeated). Seeing that Roddenberry frequently described Trek as "Horatio Hornblower in space" I would say that Roddenberry borrowed the nautical term to have a new meaning.

Medicine

Submission + - SPAM: A new strategy to fight HIV and AIDS

Roland Piquepaille writes: "An international team of researchers has developed a novel strategy against HIV. They added two genes to immune cells which 'transformed them into potent weapons that destroy cells infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.' This idea of 'genetically engineering immune cells to redirect their infection-fighting ability toward killing HIV-infected cells could lead to an entirely new approach for combating AIDS.' This research looks promising, but it's only working in labs right now. But read more and please note that this is a very different story from the one you mentioned on March 1, Researchers Discover Gene That Blocks HIV."
Space

US To Shoot Down Dying Satellite 429

A user writes "US officials say that the Pentagon is planning to shoot down a broken spy satellite expected to hit the Earth in early March. We discussed the device's decaying orbit late last month. The Associated Press has learned that the option preferred by the Bush administration will be to fire a missile from a U.S. Navy cruiser, and shoot down the satellite before it enters Earth's atmosphere. 'A key concern ... was the debris created by Chinese satellite's destruction -- and that will also be a focus now, as the U.S. determines exactly when and under what circumstances to shoot down its errant satellite. The military will have to choose a time and a location that will avoid to the greatest degree any damage to other satellites in the sky. Also, there is the possibility that large pieces could remain, and either stay in orbit where they can collide with other satellites or possibly fall to Earth.'"
NASA

Submission + - SPAM: NASA's Hubble telescope snaps gargantuan galaxy

coondoggie writes: "NASA today said its Hubble Space Telescope has captured a new image what it calls a giant cosmic fossil. The fossil is actually a galaxy, dubbed NGC 1132 which is the aftermath of an enormous multi-galactic pile-up, where the carnage of collision after collision has built up a brilliant but fuzzy giant elliptical galaxy far outshining typical galaxies. NGC 1132, together with the small dwarf galaxies surrounding it, are dubbed a 'fossil group" as they are most likely the remains of a group of galaxies that merged together in the recent past, NASA said. [spam URL stripped]"
Link to Original Source
Security

Submission + - Fake Codec is Mac OS X Trojan

Kenny A. writes: "Multiple news organisations (ZDNet, The Register, SC Magazine) are reporting on an in-the-wild Mac OS X malware attack that uses porn lures to plant phishing Trojans on Mac machines. The attack site attempts to trick users into download a disk image (.dmg) file disguised as a codec that's required for viewing the video. If the Mac machine's browser is set to to open "Safe" files after downloading, the .dmg gets mounted and the Installer is launched. The target must click through a series of screens to become infected but once the Trojan is installed, it has full control of the machine."
PlayStation (Games)

Submission + - PS3 makes it on Guinness Book of Records

Aditi.Tuteja writes: "Sony’s next-generation PlayStation 3 console is a part of Guinness World Records, it has been recognized as the world’s most powerful distributed computing network. This is the outcome of Stanford University’s Folding@home project. The record was made as Folding@home surpassed one petaflop, a computing milestone that had never been reached before by a distributed computing network."

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