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Programming

Ask Slashdot: Joining a Startup As an Older Programmer? 274

First time accepted submitter bdrasin (17319) writes "I've had a series of interviews with a late-term startup (approx. 300 employees) and I think there is a good chance they will make me an offer. The technology is great, my skills and interests are a good fit for the position, I think the company has a promising future, and I like they team. Frankly I'm damn excited about it, more so than for any job in my career. However, I'm worried about what could euphemistically be called 'cultural' issues. I'm a few years over 40, with a wife and kids, and all of the engineers at the company seem to be at least 10 years younger than I am. Being at the company's office gives me a distinct old guy at the club feeling. I don't think the overall number of hours the team works is more than I could handle, but the team does a lot of young-single-guy-at-a-startup group activities (rent-a-limo-and-go-clubbing night, weekends in Tahoe, Burning Man, in-office happy hour) that I wouldn't want or be able to participate in; I need to be home with my family for dinner most nights and weekends and so on. I'm wondering if anyone else has had the experience of working at a startup with, or as, an older programmer, and how it worked out?"
Earth

Talking To the Public: the Biggest Enemy To Reducing Greenhouse Emissions 324

Lasrick writes: "Lucien Crowder is fed up with the notion that solutions for climate change would be easier to enact if only the public (especially the American public) understood the science better. Crowder looks to nuclear disarmament advocates as a model, as the move to reduce nuclear weapons has seen comparatively greater success even without public awareness and understanding: 'Indeed, in the nuclear and climate realms, desirable policy often seems to flow less from public engagement than from public obliviousness. Disarmament advocates, no matter how they try, cannot tempt most ordinary people into caring about nuclear weapons—yet stockpiles of weapons steadily, if still too slowly, decrease. Climate advocacy provokes greater passion, but passion often manifests itself as outraged opposition to climate action, and atmospheric carbon has reached levels unseen since before human beings evolved.'"

Comment Re:There needs to be clear jurisdictional bounds (Score 1) 297

There are many places where "airplane" space goes all the way to the ground. One inch off the ground puts you in FAA controlled airspace in these areas.

Class B, C, and D airports all have controlled airspace to the surface within a few miles of the runway center, and some Class E (non-towered fields) also have Class E airspace "to the surface."

I don't know where this occurred, but it's entirely possible that he was flying in controlled airspace.

Data Storage

Sony Tape Storage Breakthrough Could Bring Us 185 TB Cartridges 208

jfruh (300774) writes "Who says tape storage is out of date? Sony researchers have announced a breakthrough in magnetic tape tech that increases the data density per square inch by a factor of 74. The result could be 185 TB tape cartridges. 'By comparison, LTO-6 (Linear Tape-Open), the latest generation of magnetic tape storage, has a density of 2 gigabits per square inch, or 2.5 TB per cartridge uncompressed.'"

Comment BBT is a bore (Score 1) 253

I honestly thought the show was pretty funny for the first couple of seasons, but then it wore off. Why? Because it's just the same formulaic, stereotypical nonsense after 7 or 8 seasons.

It's basically a very predictable slapstick comedy with a bunch of technical and scientific jargon sprinkled on it.

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It isn't easy being the parent of a six-year-old. However, it's a pretty small price to pay for having somebody around the house who understands computers.

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