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Comment I'm not bothered by break-in attempts (Score 1) 241

I watch my daily security logs from time to time, but the only remote login attempts I see are my own. I can attribute this to several layers of security:

  • I'm using a dynamic IP address.
  • Access to my home network is gated through my router. Any incoming SSH connection is directed to a specific IP address on the inside, which is only configured when my computer happens to be running Linux.
  • ACL's on the router prohibit SSH connections from everywhere except specific source subnet's I've opened up, and some of those (like work) are only open at certain times during the day.
  • I'm subscribed to my Linux distributor's security updates, and apply them on a regular basis.

I won't claim that it's perfect protection, but one of the best things you can do to secure a system is to shut out all access by default and then only open tiny pinholes for the specific connections you need.

Comment This means very little to me (Score 3) 121

I've seldom trusted consumer reviews, not because they might be fake, but because "consumers" often lack enough experience with large enough numbers of competing products for their opinions to hold any weight. When I'm looking for reviews of a product, I want professional reviews from journalists who are dedicated to researching the genre.

Comment Easily worked around (Score 1) 126

The problem with claiming "innovation" in the pharmaceutical industry is that they can easily bypass existing patents simply by tweaking the processes or non-essential ingredients in creating a drug to make it just different enough to claim it as a different product. That doesn't really help society at all. The rate of discoveries of "high social value" has not risen significantly in the presence of patents. See Boldrin & Levine: "Against Intellectual Monopoly", Chapter 9.

Comment RAID + bacula (Score 2) 304

I have been using RAID for many years — RAID-1 at work as I only have two drives and don't need much storage space, and RAID-5 at home. A couple of years ago when I upgraded my computer at work, I downloaded at least three different backup systems to try out. The goals were simplicity of use, keeping historical versions of files, and relatively low storage space.

After setting up bacula, I never bothered with the other backup applications.

I found bacula to be highly flexible, adapted very well to the set of many virtual machines I use, and is the easiest to maintain. I just set it up once (or after any major re-partitioning) with a specific list of files and directories to back up or exclude, then practically forget about it. It's saved my files a number of times already from accidental deletion or overwriting, and I used it once for a full restore at home after upgrading my computer including a new RAID array.

At work my excess hard drive space is enough to store all my full and incremental backups locally, but I also have it back up critical files to a corporate NFS server. At home I use LTO-4 tapes, which provide plenty of backup storage for over 2 terabytes of data; and whenever it runs a full backup I take the used tapes off-site for extra security.

Comment Re:Patents should promote innovation (Score 2) 249

I've read evidence that industrial patents do not promote innovation, but hinder it instead. The most effective tools for profiting from either a product or a process are secrecy, complementary manufacturing, and market lead time. (Boldrin & Levine, [2008], "Against Intellectual Monopoly")

Comment Can't trust closed source apps (Score 1) 179

This is part of the reason I don't trust close-source applications that require Internet access. At least with open source I can take a look at the code and see, "hey — this program is running a key logger!" I can then modify the code and permissions and run the application without the offending network activity.

(I actually did that with one program, found on code.google.com no less. It was written with a key logger that uses a closed-source library called FlurryAgent.)

Space

Submission + - Saturn's Rings Formed from Large Moon Destruction (spacefellowship.com)

Matt_dk writes: The formation of Saturn's rings has been one of the classical if not eternal questions in astronomy. But one researcher has provided a provocative new theory to answer that question. Robin Canup from the Southwest Research Institute has uncovered evidence that the rings came from a large, Titan-sized moon that was destroyed as it spiraled into a young Saturn.
Microsoft

Submission + - Ubuntu: we won't moan to EU about Microsoft (pcpro.co.uk)

Barence writes: The company behind the Ubuntu Linux distro says it has no plans to follow Opera's lead and file a complaint against Microsoft to the EU. Ubuntu 10.10 is the most "consumer-friendly" version of the Linux distro to date, but it faces an uphill battle against Microsoft's marketing machine. Even high-profile supporter Dell has dropped Ubuntu machines from its website in recent months, while continuing to remind visitors that "Dell recommends Windows 7" at the top of every PC page. However, Canonical won't take inspiration from Opera and complain about anti-competitive behaviour to the EU — a move which saw Microsoft forced to offer rival browsers to Windows users across Europe. "I don't think we've ever considered it," said Steve George, vice president of business development at Canonical. "The improvements we're making to Ubunutu... are a better route for us to reach out to users and get a bigger user base."
Books

Submission + - Book Review: OpenGL SuperBible (Fifth Edition)

asgard4 writes: Statistics
Title: OpenGL SuperBible (Fifth Edition)
Author: Richard S. Wright, Jr., Nicholas Haemel, Graham Sellers, Benjamin Lipchak
Pages: 969
Rating: 9/10
Publisher: Addison-Wesley Publishing http://www.awl.com/
ISBN-10: 0-32-171261-7
ISBN-13: 978-0-32-171261-5
Price: $59.99 US
Book Website: http://www.opengl.org/superbible, www.informit.com/title/9780321712615
Summary: Quite possibly the best introduction to OpenGL 3.3 programming that focuses exclusively on graphics programming using shaders.

The OpenGL SuperBible (www.informit.com/title/9780321712615) in its fifth edition is almost a complete rewrite. The authors threw out the discussion of old-style, fixed-function programming and replaced it with an introduction to OpenGL that is exclusively focused on using shaders from the very beginning. All the things that got deprecated with the advent of OpenGL 3 got removed, making it a more relevant and up-to-date book than the previous editions. The OpenGL SuperBible still strives to be the "world's best introduction to OpenGL" according to the authors. Let's see if it can keep that promise.

With the removal of the fixed-function pipeline, the OpenGL SuperBible is no longer quite the heavy-weight it used to be. It shrunk from more than 1200 to about 970 pages, which is not necessarily a bad thing. The book starts out with a basic introduction to 3D graphics, coordinate systems, and some basic math concepts, followed by short rundown of the history of OpenGL and a first little example program that renders a triangle. The authors even provide instructions on how to setup the C/C++ projects to build the example on Windows and MacOS. The writing is to the point but still verbose enough to easily follow the text. The authors analyze the example program in detail making it easy for a beginner to follow and understand the code. Overall, I really like the writing style and the flow of the book.

The next few chapters gradually introduce more and more OpenGL API functionality intermixed with new 3D graphics concepts, such as rendering points, lines, and polygons in various ways, alpha blending, how to use geometric transformations and projections, and how to move objects and the camera. Eventually, basic texture mapping is introduced with most of the basic things you need to know about the topic. In particular, specifying textures coordinates, sampling textures in the fragment shader, the various filtering modes (even anisotropic filtering), and texture compression are discussed. In a later chapter the authors do another deep dive into the topic of textures, in particular rectangle textures, cube maps, multitexturing, point sprites, and using texture arrays

Until this point the authors used haven't really talked much about shader programming yet. Most of the examples use simple pre-made shaders that don't really do much. This changes with chapter six titled "Nonstock Shaders" where we get a first glimpse of how to write our own shaders in GLSL, the OpenGL Shading Language. In particular, a fragment shader that uses a simple lighting model to light objects is developed.

After these introductory chapters presenting the basics of OpenGL programming, the next part of the book focuses on more advanced topics, beginning with buffer objects and how to use them to make your OpenGL programs run much more efficiently on modern hardware. Some of the examples presented in this part of the book include using render-to-texture to do reflections, tone mapping, and bloom. This part of the book closes with two fairly long chapters on advanced usage of the shader pipeline, in particular the transform feedback and the geometry shader stages. There is also some discussion on more advanced effects achievable with fragment shaders, in particular applying filters to images, such as a Gaussian blur or a Sobel filter. Finally, rendering geometry efficiently with vertex buffer objects and rendering many objects via geometry instancing is presented.

The final part of the book consists of 4 chapters explaining how to integrate OpenGL with the underlying operating system, in particular with Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux plus various other Unix flavors. The last chapter of this part of the book is about OpenGL ES, which is a version of OpenGL designed to be used especially on embedded system devices, in particular mobile phones and PDAs, to render real-time, interactive 3D graphics.

The book has a lot of images and diagrams throughout, though unfortunately not all of them are in color. There are however 24 color plates of the most interesting images in the middle of the book. The complete source code of the book, and even precompiled binaries for Windows and Mac OS X, can be downloaded from the book’s webpage http://www.opengl.org/superbible.

If you are new to both 3D graphics programming and OpenGL with a bit of C/C++ programming experience and you are eager to learn how to develop interactive programs with OpenGL, then this book is exactly right for you. The book is written in an easy to understand style without skimming the details (or even more advanced topics). It is the most comprehensive introduction to OpenGL that doesn’t require a lot of previous knowledge I have seen to date. The decision to completely drop any discussion of the fixed-function pipeline turned out to be an excellent choice. Finally there is a book that no longer wastes the reader's time with the parts of OpenGL that nobody who does serious graphics development uses and instead presents up-to-date information on how to do 3D graphics on modern graphics hardware.

All in all, the OpenGL SuperBible in its fifth edition succeeds very well in keeping its promise to be the best introduction to OpenGL and 3D graphics programming. Even after you’re done working your way through the main parts of the book you will always come back to the handy OpenGL API reference in the appendix of the book.

About the review author:
The author has been involved in real-time graphics programming for more than 10 years and works as a professional game developer for High Moon Studios http://www.highmoonstudios.com/ in sunny California.

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