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Security

Submission + - Safari for Windows security patch released

base2_celtic writes: MacInTouch [macintouch.com] reports that Apple has released an updated version of Safari for Windows. The update addresses issues CVE-2007-3186, CVE-2007-3185 and CVE-2007-2391.

The update can be obtained via Apple's Software Update mechanism, or directly from the Safari download site [apple.com].

The release notes on MacInTouch don't credit anyone with the discovery of the issues, but the notes say that Apple is actively seeking security input:

As with all our products, we encourage security researchers to report issues to product-security@apple.com.
Space

Journal Journal: Second Test Launch of SpaceX Falcon 1

The second test launch of the SpaceX Falcon 1 rocket took place today at 6:10 pm PST. After successfully having completed launch, first stage separation (2m 51s), second stage ignition (2m 55s), fairing separation (3m 16s), and reaching an altitude of 300 km, the vehicle was seen entering what is referred to as roll oscillations (4m 30s). Shortly thereafter, telemetry was lost. The second stage is assum
Space

Submission + - SpaceX Falcon launched, but telemetry lost

base2_celtic writes: The SpaceX Falcon rocket (and its second stage, Kestrel) both fired successfully this morning. Lift-off occurred at 0110 GMT, with the Kestrel second stage firing at T + 2 mins 52 secs.

However, telemetry from the second stage was lost at T + 5 mins 5 secs.

SpaceFlight Now [spaceflightnow.com] is running a live feed of information as it comes to hand.
Security

Submission + - A better concpet for Web-of-Trust?

An anonymous reader writes: The StartCom Certification Authority introduced recently its StartSSL(TM) Web-of-Trust Network and with it an interesting mixture of classic PKI certification requirements for its notaries, but decentralized verification for its members. With this, StartCom aims to overcome the weak points of most Web-of-Trust scheme problems. A post at their WoT dedicated forum says:

One of the reasons why StartSSL WoT can be a better trusted Web-of-Trust network than others, is the fact, that notaries have to be Class 2 certified by StartCom. This allows to always track verifications done by one or more notaries to real and verified identities. We call this the bootstrapping of notaries, since one or two notaries can start to verify other members in any region of the world without relying on already existing other notaries (provided they can be verified successfully by StartCom).

Additionally, notaries have to be at least 18 years old and undergo an online test. The test is not too difficult, however it requires the notary to actually read and understand the WoT policy...
Announcements

Submission + - Call for Articles for Encyclopedia of AI

ergosum writes: "It seems that there is a current effort to edit the "Encyclopedia of Artificial Intelligence " that will "provide comprehensive coverage and definitions of the most important issues, concepts, trends and technologies in Artificial Intelligence." It will "be distributed worldwide among academic and professional institutions and will be instrumental in providing researchers, scholars, students and professionals with access to the latest knowledge related to Artificial Intelligence techniques." If you're interested "consider submitting a proposal on any of the proposed topics for this upcoming encyclopedia by submitting a brief (75-100 words) description of your proposed topic to us by no later than January 30, 2007 (Has been extended)." More info and list of topics: http://sabia.tic.udc.es/encyclopediaAI/Call_for_Ar ticles.htm"
The Media

Submission + - Senate bill bans Net & satellite radio recordi

kaufmanmoore writes: The new congress is the same as the old congress as Sens. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), Joseph Biden (D-Del.) and Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) reintroduced a bill that would require internet radio, music offered via digital cable, XM and Sirius to pay "fair market value" to use music libraries under members of the RIAA. FTA: "The proposal says that all audio services — Webcasters included — would be obligated to implement "reasonably available and economically reasonable" copy-protection technology aimed at preventing "music theft" and restricting automatic recording." The act also restricts "manual" recording saying that it should only be done "in a manner that is not an infringement of copyright." The full article is available from Cnet

Feed Futuristic Fridge Mimics Tree (wired.com)

The Tree House Fridge looks like a Wile E. Coyote prop -- a multi-chambered whatnot box rather than a big, cold rectangle. Separate branches hold meat, cheese, produce and other stuff -- cool! In Gadget Lab.


Feed Toyota Fights a Sea of Recalls (wired.com)

The company's attention to detail verges on OCD and consumer problems bring out more than ritual self-abasement. Toyota's first full-time quality chief cracks down to catch and fix glitches early. In Autopia.


Portables (Apple)

Submission + - iPhone 3rd party development support petition

Alex Speller writes: According to http://www.petitiononline.com/iphone/petition.html :

"Apple's major competitors in this space (Palm, BlackBerry and Windows Mobile) were given a thorough drubbing by Steve Jobs during his latest MacWorld keynote. But all of these platforms allow easy, open 3rd-party development by developers large and small. Even the vast majority of non-"smart" mobile phones allow the installation of mobile Java applications, including complex games. In the case of Palm, it is possible to develop and distribute applications with no licensing fees and no software investment. As a result, the thousands of free and shareware applications developed by the community are largely considered the platform's biggest asset.

The software included with the iPhone is incredible, with functionality and user interfaces far superior to the standard software included with any other handheld. But as amazing as it is, it's just not enough. With a tiny investment, any smartphone can be enabled to edit Office documents, connect to chat networks, read electronic books, manage a diet, and play games. All of these activities would be better, easier, faster and more enjoyable on the iPhone, so it breaks our heart to know that, if Apple maintains its closed stance, none of this potential will be realized. "
The Courts

Submission + - Cisco lost rights to iPhone trademark last year?

An anonymous reader writes: An investigation into the ongoing trademark dispute between Cisco and Apple over the name "iPhone" appears to show that Cisco does not own the mark as claimed in their recent lawsuit. This is based on publicly available information from the US Patent and Trademark office, as well as public reviews of Cisco products over the past year. The trademark was apparently abandoned in late 2005/early 2006 because Cisco was not using it. TFA: http://blogs.zdnet.com/Burnette/?p=236
Communications

Submission + - Undersea cable repair via 19th century technology

An anonymous reader writes: Workers are relying on 19th century technology to fix a very 21st century problem — disruption of the Internet traffic that tech-savvy Asia relies on. "No electronics involved," said John Walters, general manager of Global Marine, one of the firms engaged in the repairs. "It's an old and traditional technique. After arriving at the scene they survey the ocean bottom to assess whether the contour has changed, and the degree of sediment movement. Then the traditional tools are brought out. A rope with a grapnel on the end is played out, down into the depths, and towed over the sea floor until tension registers on a graph on the ship, indicating contact has been made with the cable. Today's fibre optic cables are just 21 millimetres in diameter. The grapnel is a metal tool about 18 by 24 inches (46 by 61 centimetres) which includes a cutter, like a fine razor blade, and a grabbing tool. As tension increases and the cable is slowly pulled up, it is cut, grabbed, and half of it is hoisted to the surface. Dropping the grapnel, dragging the sea bed and recovering the cable can take about 16 hours, Walters said. "It is a tried and tested method." Once the severed half of the cable is on board the boat, debris is cleared from the damaged end, it is tested, sealed and the end boiled off. Then it is attached to a buoy on the water surface while the process is repeated for the second half of the cable before both halves are spliced together and dropped back to the ocean floor. Even before the Boxing Day earthquake, Global Marine had faced a busy year, with about 20 repairs after damage from fishermen or anchors. All those ruptures were fixed using the old grapnel method, he said.

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