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Windows

Submission + - 'Seamless computing' ties all your gadgets togethe (cnet.com)

Eric Smalley writes: "Imagine if you could cut and paste information among your smartphone, tablet, smart table, and big screen. Better yet, what if you could flick objects from one device to another? Software developer Nsquared has tied together a Windows Phone 7, Slate tablet, Microsoft Surface smart table, and Kinect-controlled big screen into one seamless computing experience."
Transportation

Submission + - Traffic App Could Change Driving Forever (time.com)

schwit1 writes: Researchers from MIT and Princeton have developed a smartphone application called SignalGuru that uses the camera from a dashboard-mounted smartphone to capture images of traffic lights. Once the images are captured, they're analyzed to detect whether the lights are green, yellow or red and then that data is passed along to other nearby SignalGuru users.

Using the resulting data, the app can relay to a particular driver how quickly he or she will need to drive in order to make the next light. If the next light is already red, the driver can coast up to it slowly instead.

Facebook

Submission + - Facebook Patents Private Profiles (zdnet.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Facebook has patented a “System and method for managing information flow between members of an online social network.” That’s the official title for patent number 8,010,458. Of course, Facebook as well as other social networks has been using this technology for a long time now, although Palo Alto’s is arguably the most complex.

Submission + - T-Mobile may offer signal boosters to fleeing subs (bgr.com)

zacharye writes: T-Mobile intends to offer cellular signal boosters to customers looking to switch carriers due to poor reception at home, according to T-Mobile watcher TmoNews. The move appears to be part of a new program intended to slow service quality-related cancellations, which are apparently a significant problem for the nation’s No. 4 carrier. Beginning on September 7th, T-Mobile will seemingly begin offering in-home signal boosters “when a customer triggers for cancellation of service due to poor in-home coverage,” according to a purported leaked internal memo to T-Mobile staff...

Submission + - How to hack the HP TouchPad (itreviews.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: Getting hold of HP's discounted $99 (£89) TouchPad is tough, but if you're one of the lucky few to get your hands on greatest bang-for-buck purchase of 2011, there are ways to boost the capabilities of the device still further.

ITReviews.com's step-by-step guide covers WebOS performance tweaks, overclocking and installing unapproved third-party apps on the Touchpad

Science

Submission + - Fingertip vibrator boosts your sense of touch (cnet.com)

Eric Smalley writes: "Combine the words "vibrator," "touch," and "heightened sensitivity," and the subject is obvious, right? A tricked-out glove that heightens your sense of touch.

The glove, developed by Georgia Tech researchers, includes a tiny vibrator that sits on the side of your finger. Turn the vibrator so low that you don't quite notice it vibrating, and voila, your fingertip is more sensitive to touch."

Games

Submission + - FBI: Arrested Gang Talks Using Game Network (publicintelligence.net)

smitty777 writes: PI found an FBI memo that discusses how members of the Bloods gang in the Bronx are using the Play Station Network to communicate with each other, even though they are under house arrest. This would definitely contravene the rules imposed by the US Courts, which severely restricts communication with the outside world. Achievement unlocked!
Wikipedia

Submission + - Wikipedia is losing contributors (npr.org)

derGoldstein writes: From npr: "Speaking with The Associated Press on the sidelines of the website's annual conference, Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales said the nonprofit company that runs the site is scrambling to simplify editing procedures in an attempt to retain volunteers". According to Wales: "We are not replenishing our ranks ... It is not a crisis, but I consider it to be important." Despite Wikipedia's wide-reaching popularity, Wales said the typical profile of a contributor is "a 26-year-old geeky male" who moves on to other ventures, gets married and leaves the website.
Medicine

Submission + - Hacker details wireless attack on insulin pumps (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "At the Black Hat conference, security researcher Jerome Radcliffe has detailed how our use of SCADA insulin pumps, pacemakers, and implanted defibrillators could lead to untraceable, lethal attacks from half a mile away. Radcliffe, who is a diabetic with a wireless, always-attached insulin pump, was slightly worried that someone might hack his pump, meddle with its settings, and kill him — and so, in true hacker fashion, he has spent the last two years trying to hack it himself. Unfortunately, he was very successful."
Facebook

Submission + - Spam King Wallace Indicted for Facebook Spam (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: "Notorious spam king Sanford Wallace is facing federal fraud charges for allegedly breaking into the Facebook accounts of 500,000 victims in 2008 and 2009 and using the stolen credentials to post 27 million spam messages. The charges are outlined in an indictment, filed July 6 but made public Thursday after Wallace turned himself in to federal authorities. If convicted, Wallace could get more than 16 years in prison."

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